For Ongoing Basis Grant Opportunities Please Click Here

Faculty Opportunities

There are 37 opportunity(s) listed at this time .

 

Deadline: 04/30/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $25,000.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


The U.S.-Argentina Workforce Development Competition is supported through a generous contribution from Chevron Corporation and the U.S. Department of State through the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina. This Innovation Fund competition is open to all higher education institutions in the United States and Argentina that promote study abroad and training opportunities in the fields of Economic Development and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), with a special emphasis on energy, geosciences, or natural resources management.


The intent of the U.S.-Argentina Workforce Development Competition is to award up to eleven (11) Innovation Grants of up to $25,000 to selected proposals. Partners, DOS, and NAFSA reserve the right to fund any or none of the Innovation Fund grant applications submitted.


Chevron Corporation is one of the world’s leading integrated energy companies. Through its subsidiaries that conduct business worldwide, the company is involved in virtually every facet of the energy industry. Chevron explores for, produces and transports crude oil and natural gas; refines, markets and distributes transportation fuels and lubricants; manufactures and sells petrochemicals and additives; generates power; and develops and deploys technologies that enhance business value in every aspect of the company’s operations. Chevron is based in San Ramon, California. More information about Chevron is available at www.chevron.com.

 


http://www.100kstrongamericas.org/grants/
Posted: 04/02/2018

Deadline: 04/30/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $3,000.00
Funding Agency(s): U.S. Department of State (DOS)


Background Information:  The Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy announces an open competition for individuals, non-governmental organizations, think tanks, public educational institutions, and public international organizations in Ethiopia and in the United States to submit proposals that fall into one of the thematic areas specified below.

Purpose of Annual Program Statement (APS):  The APS is intended to inform individuals, non-governmental organizations, think tanks, and academic institutions about opportunities from the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy to support projects in the following thematic areas:

1. Strengthening independent media through media literacy, training and other engagement

2. STEAM

3. Engaging underserved populations, including persons with disabilities,through art, sports, culture and other creative programs

4. Engaging emerging, underrepresented voices and supporting the capacity for constructive engagement

5. Promoting tolerance and peace through dialogue

6. Promoting economic growth, especially via entrepreneurship

7. Promoting sustainable policies to protect the environment

8. Women and/or youth empowerment through education  Proposals must incorporate a detailed narrative that outlines the plan of action, describes the scope of the proposed work, how it will be accomplished, and how fulfills a broad U.S. Embassy priority:

  1. Strengthen Democratic Institutions and Expand Human Rights: improve internal stability and strengthen rule of law through active engagement with stakeholders; improve learning outcomes by increasing achievement in education; and improve workforce skills development.
  2. Spur Broad-based Economic Growth and Promote Development: strengthen role of women and youth in economic activity; improve trade and investment climate; increase development and growth of the domestic private sector; and increase livelihood transition opportunities.
  3. Advance Regional Peace and Security: promote regional peace and security

Activities that are typically funded include, but are not limited to:

  • STEAM education and programs;
  • Women’s empowerment;
  • Youth leadership, empowerment and education programs;
  • Media literacy and journalism training projects;
  • English language programs;
  • Youth community service projects and volunteerism;
  • Civic education projects;
  • Awareness of democratic processes and human rights;
  • Creating dialogue and tolerance through sports, the arts, and/or cultural activities.

Activities that are not typically funded include, but are not limited to:

  • Projects that do not have a plan for sustainability, monitoring and evaluating results;
  • Projects that are mainly designed to pay organizational and administrative costs;
  • Social welfare projects;
  • Construction or building projects;
  • Completing activities started under a separate financial source;
  • International travel, unless specifically justified within the project;
  • Individual research projects to complete degree requirements;
  • Research projects that do not meet U.S. Embassy priorities.
  1. Award Information

Funding Instrument Type:  Grant or Cooperative Agreement

Floor of Individual Award Amounts:  $3,000

Ceiling of Individual Award Amounts:  $50,000

The U.S. Embassy Public Affairs Section reserves the right to award less or more than the funds described in the absence of worthy applications or under such other circumstances as it may deem to be in the best interest of the U.S. government.

Project and Budget Periods:  Projects must be completed in one year or less.

Anticipated start date is October 1, 2018; anticipated end date is September 30, 2019.

  • Eligibility Information

Applications are welcome from all sectors: individuals, non-governmental organizations, think tanks, public educational institutions, and public international organizations in Ethiopia and in the United States.  Applicants are encouraged to provide cost-sharing from additional sources; applications should explain clearly other likely sources of funding or in-kind participation.

  1. Application, Submission and Deadline

Application

The application comprises the following components:

  1. Mandatory application forms:

 

  • SF-424 (Organizations) or SF-424-I (Individuals)
  • SF-424A (Budget information for non-construction projects)
  • SF-424B (Assurances for non-construction programs)

 

  1. Summary Page: Cover sheet stating the applicant name and organization, proposal date, program title, program period (proposed start and end date), and brief purpose of the program.
  2. Proposal: The proposal should contain sufficient information that anyone not familiar with it would understand exactly what the applicant wants to do. You may use your own proposal format, but it must include all the items below.
  • Proposal Summary: Short narrative that outlines the proposed program, including program objectives and anticipated impact.
  • Introduction to the Organization or Individual applying: A description of past and present operations, showing ability to carry out the program, including information on all previous grants from the U.S. Embassy and/or U.S. government agencies.
  • Problem Statement: Clear, concise and well-supported statement of the problem to be addressed and why the proposed program is needed.
  • Program Goals and Objectives: The “goals” describe what the program is intended to achieve. The “objectives” refer to the intermediate accomplishments on the way to the goals. These should be achievable and measurable.
  • Program Activities: Describe the program activities and how they will help achieve the objectives.
  • Program Methods and Design: A description of how the program is expected to work to solve the stated problem and achieve the goal.
  • Proposed Program Schedule and Timeline: The proposed timeline for the program activities. Include the dates, times, and locations of planned activities and events.
  • Key Personnel: Names, titles, roles and experience/qualifications of key personnel involved in the program.
  • Program Partners: List the names and type of involvement of key partner organizations and sub-awardees.
  • Program Monitoring and Evaluation Plan: This is an important part of successful grants. Throughout the time-frame of the grant, how will the activities be monitored to ensure they are happening in a timely manner, and how will the program be evaluated to make sure it is meeting the goals of the grant?
  • Future Funding or Sustainability: Applicant’s plan for continuing the program beyond the grant period, or the availability of other resources, if applicable.
  1. Budget: Please include information about these categories in the budget:  

 

  1. Personnel
  2. Fringe benefits
  3. Travel
  4. Equipment
  5. Supplies
  6. Contractual
  7. Construction
  8. Other
  9. Other direct charges (sum of a-h)
  10. Indirect charges

Submission

Proposals should be submitted via email to the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy at PASAddisGrants@state.gov. Additional standard forms and hard copies of proposals will be required from selected projects. Proposals must be in the English language.

  1. Review and Selection Process

Each application submitted under this announcement will be evaluated and rated on the basis of the evaluation criteria outlined below.  The criteria are designed to assess the quality of the proposed project and to determine the likelihood of its success.  The criteria are closely related and are considered as a whole in judging the overall quality of an application.  Applications will be reviewed on the basis of their completeness, coherence, clarity, and attention to detail.

Applicants must submit a full project description, including a detailed narrative that outlines the plan of action, describing the scope of the proposed work and how it will be accomplished.  The narrative should be accompanied by a detailed budget that includes all program costs and clearly indicates the proposing organization’s cost-share and/or in-kind participation.

Application Evaluation Criteria:

Goals and Objectives – The project is likely to provide maximum impact in achieving the proposed results.  The project addresses one or more of the U.S. Embassy Public Affairs Section priorities outlined above. Strengths and Innovation – Applicant clearly describes how its proposal will address the problem within the proposed time frame and articulates an innovative strategy or plan.  The project builds civil society leadership and capacity, and demonstrates sustainable capacity building.

Organizational Capacity – The organization has expertise and demonstrates the ability to perform the proposed activities.

Sustainability – The organization demonstrates a clear plan for sustainable activity or impact of the activity after the grant period of performance.

Budget and Budget Justification – The budget and narrative justification are reasonable in relation to the proposed activities and anticipated results and the plan for services is realistic. Administrative costs of the project must be 10% of the total budget unless the applying organization has established Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA) with the State Department.

Anticipated Time to Award:  Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis.  Applicants should expect to be notified within 30-45 days after the deadlines of the two application periods.

Reporting Requirements:  All awards issued under this announcement will require both program and financial reports on a frequency specified in the award agreement.  The disbursement of funds may be tied to submission of these reports in a timely manner.  All other details related to award administration will be specified in the award agreement.


https://et.usembassy.gov/annual-program-statement-aps/
Posted: 04/09/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)


THE OPPORTUNITY

Consumers in low- and middle-income countries purchase over $3T worth of food and beverages through formal food markets each year. Nearly half ($1.2T) of that total is spent by consumers in the lowest two global income quintiles.1 For low-income urban consumers, 75-90% of their food is purchased (as opposed to home grown), and 50-70% of the monetary value of that purchased food is processed. For low-income rural consumers, about 40% of their food is purchased. However, because many of today’s processed foods tend to lack nutritional density, the quality of low-income consumer diets remains an issue, despite the consumer’s regular engagement with formal food markets.

Looking in detail at the products and business models that have proven viable in reaching low-income consumers, there is a clear opportunity to either improve the nutritional quality of widely-consumed foods; or encourage increased affordability, accessibility, and appeal of currently unconsumed nutritious foods. A recent cross-sectional survey that assessed consumption of commercially produced foods and beverages among infants 6-23 months of age in Dakar, Dar es Salaam, Kathmandu Valley, and Phnom Penh found that 80-90% of urban children had consumed a commercially produced packaged food within the previous week, and 23-74% within the prior day.2 Moreover, the most commonly consumed packaged foods were: chips or crisps, cookies, cakes or doughnuts, and candies.

Lack of availability of affordable nutritious foods, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, is a major issue. In the U.S., the average fortified infant cereal is relatively affordable, at 3.7x the cost of our staple grain food product (bread). In India, that ratio is 11.1x and in Nigeria, 30.3x.3 Beyond the products themselves, ensuring access to nutritious foods through the distribution and retail channels that reach low-income consumers is a challenge. Lack of knowledge about nutritious food choices, or low appeal of those food products, further compounds the problem.

As a result, most low-income consumers do not consume a high-quality diet sufficient to ensure adequate intakes of vitamins, minerals and other essential nutrients. The WHO recommends that children consume at least 4 different food groups a day as a minimum, and findings from the International Food Policy Research Institute suggest that children who reach this standard of minimum dietary diversity are 22% less likely to be stunted.4However, few developing countries have reached this threshold, with just 19% of children 6-23 months in countries such as India and Nigeria consuming adequately diverse diets. Moreover, the 2013 Lancet Global Burden of Disease study highlighted that many of the leading risk factors for both chronic and infectious diseases are linked to low quality diets; which in turn, undermines the health and development of low and middle-income economies.5 Identifying lower-cost ways to develop and deliver optimal nutrition is a global public health and development priority.

While the challenges are formidable, we believe there is significant opportunity for innovation within our market-based food systems to improve the health of nutritionally vulnerable populations.

THE CHALLENGE

We desire to advance innovative technologies to enhance the availability and accessibility of affordable, nutritious foods for low-income consumers, working within the key constraint that these innovations must be relevant to market-based food systems in low and middle-income countries. Overall, our target population is young women, mothers, and children from 6-23 months of age. Accordingly, the proposed technologies funded must not undermine exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months of life.

What we are looking for:

This call is open to all respondents, and we particularly encourage proposals from the private sector and/or entities that have partnerships with the private sector - to ensure a pathway to commercialization at scale. Our first principle is to leverage existing innovation within the food and beverage industry and its suppliers for new applications that can reach low-income consumers, for greatest scale and impact. We also welcome technologies and translational approaches based on knowledge from ancillary fields, e.g., veterinary science, pharmaceuticals, etc. Proposals should address one of the following five innovation areas across the value chain:

R21 Nutrition

Below is an illustrative sample of the many options we would consider funding. However, recognizing that creative solutions can come from many places, we are also open to proposals that take these domain areas in a different direction.

Ingredients

  • Nutritious ingredient cost innovations, e.g., reducing the cost of milk powder
  • Locally-sourced high protein/nutrient processed raw materials at very affordable costs
  • Fortification innovations to improve the bioavailability, stability, fortification level, and/or combinability of micronutrients in fortified foods, e.g., bioactive peptides, new encapsulation technologies, gut / microbiome approaches
  • Use of new technologies or novel ingredients to significantly reduce or replace sugar/salt/fat, e.g., natural additives

Food/Beverage Products

  • Development of affordable, complementary feeding products (for 6-23 month-olds) with improved consumer appeal in low- and middle-income countries
  • Fortification of alternative food vehicles with penetration in low-income communities (i.e. tea, water, etc.)

Processing and Packaging

  • New packaging solutions to protect vitamins in fortified foods within hot/humid distribution channels
  • Alternate, cost-reduced forms of packaging suitable for small-quantity items such as condiments and single-serving foods

Food Fortification Monitoring/Compliance

  • Cost-effective approaches to ensure compliance with micronutrient fortification standards, e.g. IT-enabled dosifiers

Distribution

  • New delivery mechanisms for reaching nutritionally vulnerable groups (both urban and rural)
  • Low-cost cold chain technologies for ensuring preservation of adequate nutrition

Demand

  • Novel platforms for raising consumer awareness and demand for nutritious foods

We will not consider funding for approaches that:

 

  • Detract from immediate and exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months after birth
  • Are in foundational or discovery stages of research
  • Target upper-income/ middle-income consumers
  • Require significant user/operator behavior change, or are likely to have low consumer acceptability
  • Are more targeted toward agricultural or commodity inputs than consumable food products
  • Are squarely within the domain of food safety, given other upcoming requests for proposals on this topic

 

 


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/affordable-accessible-and-appealing-next-generation-nutrition-round-21
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)


THE CONTEXT:

Farmers in every region of the world struggle to protect their crops from pests and disease. Nowhere is the situation more dire than for farmers in low-income countries. Inconsistent access to crop protection products, inadequate knowledge of best-practice control strategies, and a lack of awareness of pest and disease outbreaks leave most farmers unprepared and ill-equipped to respond effectively. Infestations of plant pests and epidemics of plant diseases can destroy crop yields completely, devastating low-income farming families who depend upon the harvest for their food and livelihoods.

Despite the broad impact of these biotic stresses, few data exist on the true burden of crop pests and diseases for low-income countries. Such data are logistically challenging and expensive to obtain through traditional survey methods. Thus, comprehensive, real-time measures of what pests and disease are present, where, and to what severity are severely lacking. Emerging research in data science, engineering, biology, chemistry, computer science, telecommunications and other relevant fields presents an opportunity for a step-change in crop pest and disease surveillance for low-income countries and around the world.

THE CHALLENGE:

The goal of this topic is to solicit innovative tools and technologies for crop pests and disease surveillance over large geographic regions in low-income countries. We are looking for tools and approaches that have the potential to transform crop pest and disease surveillance globally, with a focus on low-income countries. Ideas that result in increased coverage of geographic area will be prioritized over ideas that increase diagnostic accuracy. Ideas that are applicable or adaptable to multiple crops and diseases/pests will be prioritized over ideas that are specific to only one crop or pathogen. Because we are focused on low-income countries, successful proposals will take into account small-scale, difficult-to-reach, intercropped farming systems with multiple pests and diseases. Preliminary data is not required, but proposals should clearly demonstrate how the idea is an innovative leap in progress from current practices with the potential to be transformative at scale.

To be considered, proposals must closely align with the goals of the foundation’s Agricultural Development team. As such, we are looking for proposals that:

  • Offer an innovative and transformative solution for surveillance and early detection of crop pests and diseases;
  • Offer potential for dramatic cost reductions or increases in efficiency or precision compared to current strategies;
  • Be amenable to integration into a national or regional pest and disease surveillance and response system for crop plants;
  • Have potential applicability to at least two of the following crops: maize, wheat, rice, millet, sorghum, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, bananas, beans, cowpeas, chickpeas, and groundnuts;
  • Convey a clear potential for achieving broad geographic scale.

A few examples of the many possible examples to be considered include:

  • Multidisciplinary approaches that leverage emerging research in data science, engineering, biology, chemistry, computer science, telecommunications and other relevant fields;
  • Phone-based technologies;
  • Novel sensor-based strategies affordable to low-income country users;
  • Approaches that leverage “passive” big data sources (remote sensing, crowdsourced data, online content, social media, call center records, and other non-traditional data sources) and machine learning/artificial intelligence;
  • Other applications not highlighted here.

We will not consider funding for:

  • Incremental improvements in our knowledge or application of current pest and disease surveillance strategies;
  • Ideas that are not directly relevant to agricultural systems in low-income countries;
  • Ideas that are not applicable to the following crops: maize, wheat, rice, millet, sorghum, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, bananas, beans, cowpeas, chickpeas, and groundnuts;
  • Transfer of existing technology to a new system without innovative modification;
  • Proposals that focus solely on scaling up or delivery of existing technologies;
  • Proposals that focus solely on one-directional extension services to demonstrate or advertise existing technologies without data collection;
  • Proposals that focus solely on abiotic stresses (e.g., drought, heat, etc.).
  • Proposals that focus solely on modeling of existing data;
  • Devices or approaches focused on diagnostic capability for only one pest or disease.

https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/tools-and-technologies-broad-scale-disease-surveillance-crop-plants-low-income-countries
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Campylobacter infections have been associated with diarrheal disease as well as growth faltering in children. The fraction of severe diarrheal cases in infants attributed to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli ranged from 6% in Kenya to 12% in Bangladesh in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (Liu et al. 2016). Campylobacter is also increasingly implicated in growth faltering among children <2y of age. In the MAL-ED (Etiology, Risk Factors, and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development Project) study, 85% of children were found to have had at least one Campylobacter infection by 1 year of age, and a high burden of infection was associated with lower length-for-age Z-score (Amour et al. 2016).

The environment in which a child lives is implicated in linear growth faltering, and the relationship may be mediated by environmental enteric dysfunction (EED). Poor nutrition availability and fecal contamination are key aspects of the environment, and may interact to result in EED and stunting (Schnee and Petri, 2017). Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal in birds and in ruminants, and interaction of children with chicken feces, unpasteurized milk, and contaminated water are hypothesized to be possible sources of exposure to the bacterium especially in areas where co-housing of humans and domestic animals is common.

Recently concluded randomized controlled trials that tested the efficacy of improvements in drinking water, sanitation, and handwashing (WSH) in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) found no significant effects on gut markers of EED, growth at 18mo age, or diarrhea incidence in two out of three sites (Humphrey et al. 2017). Whereas the impact of WSH interventions in these trials on transmission of Campylobacter and other specific pathogens is as yet unknown, it is possible that they targeted only one or a few routes of exposure, and didn’t reduce transmission to below a threshold required to observe a health impact (Briscoe 1984). The MAL-ED study suggests that household crowding and chickens in the house were both associated with an increased risk ratio of asymptomatic infection with Campylobacter, whereas treatment of drinking water and improved sanitation reduced risk, suggesting that multiple routes of transmission may exist (Amour et al. 2016). Thus, understanding the possible routes of transmission in LMIC communities of interest is a priority.

In spite of mounting evidence regarding the burden of Campylobacter-attributed diarrhea as well as growth-faltering, we know little about from what, how, and where children contract infection. What role do domestic animals, which are known reservoirs of Campylobacter, play in transmission? Does infection result from fecal contamination in the environment and how long does Campylobacter survive in the environment? Are undernourished children at greater risk of contracting or transmitting infection? Do older siblings or adults in the household transmit infection to neonates and younger children? In particular, half of the children below 6 months of age—who are not yet mobile—were infected in the MAL-ED study (Amour et al. 2016), leading us to ask if human-to-human transmission is more prevalent in these settings compared to high-income settings.

OBJECTIVES OF THIS CALL

In this new grand challenge, we solicit proposals to examine the transmission of Campylobacter spp. in communities.

Proposals responsive to this call will generate data to understand the sources of Campylobacter infection in children in LMICs, and the dynamics of transmission in LMIC communities of interest. Analyses of these data are expected to address the question of whether a human vaccine for Campylobacter is a necessary and appropriate strategy in spite of the complexities associated with auto-immune responses to Campylobacter antigens. Alternatively, are an avian Campylobacter vaccine, sanitation and hygiene measures, or behavioral interventions that promote the segregation of young children from domestic birds and animals—alone or in combination—effective in preventing Campylobacter infections in children?

Alternative routes for Campylobacter infection in humans include exposure to domestic or wild animals carrying the bacterium, exposure to raw meat or raw milk, exposure to contaminated soil or water, and direct human-to-human transmission (Blaser 1997). These routes are not mutually exclusive, and understanding their relative importance in Campylobacter transmission is important so that we can intervene effectively to stop transmission, especially to the youngest, most vulnerable children.

The role of domestic animals in Campylobacter transmission

Campylobacter infects poultry, wild birds, and dairy animals, but we do not know to what extent human infection is caused by exposure to these animals in LMIC. Source attribution studies in Europe have uncovered an important role for poultry in transmitting infection in some countries but a larger role for wild birds in others (Mughini-Gras et al. 2016). There is a need to acquire more comprehensive sequence typing data from multiple sources sampled in different geographic locations in LMICs. Ideally, studies will factor in seasonality of infections and transmission routes, taking into account infections caused by other enteric pathogens. Coupled with computational models of transmission, such data can help assess the impact of alternative interventions in reducing the burden of infection and disease.

Undernourishment and transmissibility

Campylobacter infections have been associated with under-nutrition in children below 2 years of age (Platts-Mills et al. 2017; Amour et al. 2016). Yet, few data are available on the age-specific incidence and clinical importance of Campylobacter jejuniCampylobacter coli, and non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter infection in many LMICs. The non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter species may be responsible for a larger proportion of the diarrhea burden than previously believed (François et al. 2018). It is not known if species or strains vary in their ability to infect undernourished individuals. We also do not know if host nutrition status affects whether infection is clinical or sub-clinical, or if shedding and transmissibility vary depending on nutrition status. Finally, how co-infections with other enteric pathogens might impact transmissibility is unknown.

The role of the environment in Campylobacter survival and transmission

We know very little about the impact of environmental factors (temperature fluctuations, changes in osmolarity, nutrient deprivation, and natural ultraviolet radiation) and the presence of environmental protozoans on the survival and transmissibility of Campylobacter in LMICs (Snelling et al. 2005). These data will help determine how Campylobacter populations are structured in space and time, and the potential biases in prioritized interventions introduced by not sampling reservoirs contemporaneously with cases in the same geographic location.

Successful proposals responding to this call will move the community closer to understanding the source of infections, so that we can begin to define a strategy to mitigate Campylobacter infection in LMIC communities.

Examples of what we are looking for:

  1. Understanding whether strains that infect domestic and wild animals, and humans vary in a given location, and source attribution of strains causing human infection to contaminated food or water, or domestic or wild animals.
  2. Studies on transmission dynamics of Campylobacter within households and in communities. Such studies should include environmental assessments to determine relevant fomites. Studies might possibly (but need not necessarily) include data-informed computational models of transmission to assess intervention impact. Technical input and modeling expertise will be available to aid transmission modeling based on the data generated in studies funded under this call.
  3. How host (human and animal) under-nutrition affects pathogenicity and transmissibility of Campylobacter, including whether strains that cause clinical or sub-clinical infection are different.
  4. Geographic distribution of Campylobacter strains affecting children in LMICs and overlap therein. This may include concurrently assessing infection with other pathogens such as Cryptosporidium.

What we will not support:

  1. Vaccine development
  2. Studies in high-income countries
  3. Development of clinical diagnostic tools without application to transmission studies
  4. Studies of transmission based only on culture-based methods.
  5. Studies seeking to interrupt transmission.

To apply, please submit a concept note in the required format of up to 4 pages, including references and the budget, using the LOI template.

FAQS

Who can participate? This is an open solicitation. We welcome submissions from organizations in all sectors (private, NGO, government, academic, and UN). Submissions cannot come from individuals without organizational affiliation.

When are responses due? Responses are due by May 2, 2018.

When will selected applicants be invited to submit a full proposal? Finalists will be invited to submit a full proposal in June 2018.

Will I receive any compensation for submitting? You will not receive any compensation for your submission even if it is used by the foundation or third parties in any way.

What are the focus countries for this RFP? While we are not defining a set of countries, countries in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa with high rates of childhood under-nutrition are of specific interest.

What is the length of a grant that will be considered? We will consider research studies that propose a rational timeline from inception to research completion that do not exceed 2 years.

What is the budget that will be considered? We will consider research studies that propose appropriate costs for the study length, outcomes, and methods, and that propose strong value for money.


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/campylobacter-spp-transmission-dynamics-low-and-middle-income-countries
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


PREAMBLE

This joint call for proposals targeted specifically to Brazilian researchers is the result of a partnership between the Ministry of Health (MoH), the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), the National Council for State Funding Agencies (CONFAP), engaged State Funding Agency (FAPs) and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). This call is part of another initiative funded by the Gates Foundation in 2010 named Healthy Birth, Growth and Development Knowledge integration (HBGDki). The goal of this program is to use data science tools to develop a deep understanding of the risk factors contributing to poor outcomes in preterm birth, physical growth faltering and impaired neurocognitive development. Through Grand Challenges Explorations - Brazil, the above-mentioned partners share this goal and wish to build on the growing expertise in data science, epidemiology and public health in Brazil to address priority issues in maternal and child health.

THE CHALLENGE

There remain key knowledge gaps in understanding how nutrition, prenatal and antenatal care, maternal support, and environmental and social factors contribute to an elevated risk of poor maternal and childhood health outcomes. Such an understanding is required to determine what interventions, including health policies, should be delivered to which group of individuals at what point in their lifecycle to ensure optimal outcomes.

THE OPPORTUNITY

Developing and validating approaches to foster maternal and child health is challenging due to the complex interaction of biological, environmental and social factors. Furthermore, policy recommendations for such approaches frequently lack sufficient supporting scientific evidence, while clinical trials are expensive, time-consuming, and increasingly difficult to implement. There is now a key opportunity to accelerate research in this area by analyzing administrative and clinical outcomes databases in Brazil to formulate public health recommendations that are data-driven and cost effective.

The purpose of this call for proposals is to promote new and novel approaches to analyzing data related to social programs and public health in Brazil to produce novel insights which can be used to improve maternal and child health in Brazil and around the world. Applicants may choose to work with large datasets available to them or to collaborate with Center for Data and Knowledge Integration for Health (CIDACS) to explore their linked anonymized dataset (100 million Brazilian Cohort), which integrates information from the Cadastro Unico (CADU) with the live births system (SINASC), the mortality system (SIM) and Bolsa Família program (BFP) - see Appendix A for more information about data access through CIDACS.

Successful applicants to this call should assume that with the appropriate agreements and ethical approvals, they will not only receive funding but will be able to access anonymized subsets of these data available from Center for Data and Knowledge Integration for Health (CIDACS) researchers. The utilization of the health and social data, as a key focus of this call, is intended to engage a broad spectrum of collaborators - including research and clinical scientists working with data scientists, bioinformaticians, statisticians, epidemiologists, engineers and computer programmers - to identify how innovative data analytic approaches can be used to develop improved solutions to tackle the burden of maternal and child health problems in Brazil.

We also welcome applicants who have access to other relevant data sets, including publicly available data, clinical research, cohort and survey studies and other large datasets that can help address the questions below, to submit their proposals under this call. In this case, researchers who submit applications involving other data sets are responsible for securing appropriate authorization and access to the data. Applicants are encouraged to describe the steps required to access the proposed dataset in their proposals.

What we are looking for:

We seek proposals designed to answer critical scientific questions related to maternal and child health and development outcomes. Proposals should use innovative data analytics and modeling approaches that can be applied to the CIDACS linked datasets or to other relevant data sets that applicants can access. Proposals should be based on these linked datasets or existing primary data in Brazil and yield actionable results with a potential to significantly impact public health policy.

We will give highest priority to proposals that:

  • Support innovative collaborations between Brazilian research scientists, healthcare experts, and data scientists;
  • Answer critical scientific questions identified in this GCE, while building and strengthening data science capacity for Brazil;
  • Take into account social, environmental and cultural determinants of outcomes and incorporate an understanding of the target community that includes barriers and constraints to delivery of interventions and to implementation of public health programs;
  • Contribute to a portfolio of funded projects that addresses regional diversity and the need to provide health equity for diverse and vulnerable populations;
  • Explain how answers will have the highest likelihood of being relevant for implementation broadly in the public health system;
  • Describe mechanistic models for establishing the relationship between interventions and its related outcomes.

Examples of what we are looking for include analytical approaches:

  • That apply innovative analyses or machine learning techniques to identify patterns in data from “natural experiments” (e.g., the impact of economic cycles on the quality of primary care and health outcomes);
  • That stratify risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm birth and low birth weight;
  • That incorporate weight gain during pregnancy as a variable, including helping to determine the relative contributions to neonatal health outcomes of maternal diet quantity versus quality;
  • That determine the relative contributions to infant health outcomes of diet quantity versus quality (e.g., protein quantity versus quality);
  • That target underexplored subsets of data (e.g., rare but significant HBGD events that can be studied because of the large size and statistical power of the database);
  • That help convert correlations to causal hypotheses (e.g., health outcomes correlated to sex differences, maternal education, birth spacing, age of first pregnancy, establishing causal impact of air pollution on fetal growth);
  • That identify new ways to aggregate risk factors and identify vulnerable populations for adverse maternal and child health outcomes, including innovative data integration strategies and visualization tools;
  • That specifically incorporate the roles of women – as perceived locally – from adolescence to motherhood (including pregnancy during adolescence);
  • That evaluate programs for pre-pregnancy intervention for women and the effect of doing so on prenatal, maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality;
  • That determine the best care for low-birth-weight babies;
  • That help determine the window of opportunity to foster catch-up growth for preterm and low-birth-weight babies, and the most effective interventions for doing so;
  • That help identify critical periods for intervention during pregnancy and early childhood;
  • That stratify risk of stunting and wasting from birth through two years of age;
  • That target root causes of maternal mortality, including caesarean section, and address the most vulnerable population groups considering age and ethnicity;
  • That investigate the "double burden" of disease in Brazil leading to pockets of stunting and wasting in parallel with pockets with rising rates of childhood obesity.
  • That stratify risks for child development aiming to establish national indicators for healthy development from the neonatal period to the first two years of the children addressing preferably most vulnerable population groups considering age and ethnicity
  • That help to understand the relationship between social indicators, nutritional conditions and mortality from the prenatal period to the early childhood. We welcome applications addressing traditional and vulnerable populations.

Examples of what we are NOT looking for:

  • Proposals submitted by applicants from outside of Brazil.
  • Proposals for new studies to generate new data;
  • Proposals that do not focus on health outcomes in Brazil;
  • Proposals not related to maternal and child health challenges
  • Development of new primary data collection tools;
  • Approaches that do not meaningfully involve data from adolescents, mothers, or infants;
  • Applications proposing data science algorithm development without clear relevance to answering the types of questions described in this call for proposals;
  • Ideas without a clearly articulated and testable hypothesis together with metrics of success;
  • Ideas for which the described indicator of success cannot be demonstrated or significantly advanced within the scope of the GCE Phase 1 award (USD $100,000 over 18 months);
  • Proposals that do not describe the innovation’s potential effects on health policy making;
  • Analyses that are only slight improvements over existing approaches (e.g., replication of an approach in a new geography in the absence of added innovation);

APPENDIX

Center for Data and Knowledge Integration for Health

The Center for Data and Knowledge Integration for Health (CIDACS) was launched in 2016 as part of Fiocruz in Bahia to conduct innovative scientific research that broadens understanding of the effects of social and environmental determinants, including public policy, on population health in Brazil. To achieve this goal, it links information from social programs and other databases of health information systems, such as mortality, birth, communicable and non-communicable infectious diseases, among other outcomes, from different information systems maintained by the Ministry of Health. A central feature of the CIDACS platform is to produce linked datasets, whose main product is the 100 million Brazilians cohort (2006-2015). This cohort is built by linking data from individuals in the Cadastro Único (CADU) to data of the same individuals in the Bolsa Familia Program (BFP), SINASC and SIM. CADU is a national registry of individuals who could be eligible to federal government social programs. BFP is a national conditional cash transfer program which transfers cash to poor households when they comply with conditions related to health and education. (For in-depth analysis of the effects of BFP on childhood mortality, please review Rasella, et al. 2013.)1 Individuals in the BFP database must be registered in CADU. SINASC is the registry of birth certificates. SIM is the registry of death certificates.

Previous analyses performed by the CIDACS team have demonstrated that the social protection program contributed to a decrease in childhood mortality overall and in particular for deaths attributable to poverty-related causes such as malnutrition and diarrhea.

The CIDACS platform employs the highest levels of security to ensure the privacy, integrity, and ethical use of the data. Considerable research has been required to develop the processes for data receipt, curation, and to provide authorized access for analysis. In this Grand Challenges Explorations – Brazil program, the CIDACS platform will be available for the selected applicants to conduct innovative, interdisciplinary projects in the areas of maternal and child health.


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/grand-challenges-explorations-brazil-data-science-approaches-improve-maternal-and-child
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


THE CHALLENGE

In September 2015, one of the most remarkable events in human history took place. Known as the Sustainable Development Goals, or simply the Global Goals, they were signed by all 193 world leaders at the United Nation’s General Assembly. They commit to end extreme poverty, avert catastrophic climate change, tackle inequality and ensure no one is left behind before their 2030 deadline. Young people engaged more than any other group in the process of defining the priorities within the 17 Goals and 169 different targets. 75% of the 10 million people who participated in the UN's 'My World' survey, which told leaders what citizens wanted to prioritize, were under 30.

Much of the excitement and engagement by young people around the world in support of the Goals has dissipated since 2015. Making the lofty Global Goals relevant to young people's lives is challenging. Amina J. Mohammed, the United Nation's Deputy Secretary General, has highlighted this as an urgent priority: "I think the biggest challenge is keeping the momentum to achieve the SDGs. We had an incredible process over four years of developing them, it was very inclusive. Now we're seeing that much more needs to be done to deliver them, especially at the local level. Keeping the momentum, taking the SDGs from the United Nations into countries and leveraging the potential of young people to get them on the agenda is very important."

More than ever before young people have the tools and skills, afforded by technology and connectivity, to learn about, connect with and take action on the issues that affect them. But the Global Goals will only be reached if the voices, skills and ideas of youth are part of the global effort to end extreme poverty by 2030.

Different models to engage and empower youth are having huge success in different parts of the world. However, there is very limited data to show which are working, where and why. Evidence of what should be funded and scaled in this field is hard to come by. Disparate initiatives don’t necessarily add up to more than the sum of their parts.

How can young people most effectively give back to their communities to deliver more sustained positive impacts and create wider virtuous circles of development? By doing this they are contributing to the Global Goals – even though many aren’t aware of these Goals that their governments have signed up to. What are the most effective ways to positively engage youth who care about the future of the planet they will inherit, but want to take action, now, in their communities, and beyond?

Young people, who are making a positive contribution to issues in their communities, increasingly see themselves as being both citizens of where they are from, but also as citizens of the world, or global citizens. A global citizen is “someone who is aware of, and understands, the wider world – and their place in it." They care about issues that affect their communities, but don't stop there. They care about the linkages and lessons that relate their efforts with those of others in different contexts. They want to share insights and experiences to ensure their collective efforts go beyond their immediate surroundings. For global citizens, caring about issues that affect them is not enough. Their efforts go beyond awareness raising and help achieve positive, tangible change whether in behavior, perceptions, policies, or some combination of all three.

What we are looking for:

We are seeking innovators to devise and demonstrate ways to positively engage young people (under the age of 30) in Global Citizenship at scale and in depth.

A young person's personal interaction with a social cause can easily turn into lifelong commitment. Youth who have had positive experiences in contributing to, for example, the struggle to end disease, tackle gender inequality or educate young people, close at hand, are likely to make sustained contributions to that cause. Flying young people around the world to see first-hand different challenges facing different groups achieves deep engagement, but is not scalable. At the other end of the spectrum is engagement that requires little effort but has little lasting impact on the person involved. This engagement has scale, but not depth.

This challenge is about testing and implementing concepts and strategies to engage young people in efforts that will reduce inequality related to the first six Global Goals:

  • Goal 1: No poverty
  • Goal 2: Zero hunger
  • Goal 3: Good health and well-being
  • Goal 4: Quality education
  • Goal 5: Gender equality
  • Goal 6: Clean water and sanitation

Investigators are invited to propose innovative and creative solutions that uses new knowledge to positively engage young people in one or more of these goals in both scale and depth. The focus can be local, but to support Global Citizenship for the Global Goals they must also link in a clear way to efforts elsewhere – at a regional, national or global level. The initial phase, which would be funded under this initiative, must demonstrate a path to a more sustainable and scalable program. It must collect quantitative data to inform decision making for follow-on funding.

New data, evidence and approaches generated through the Challenge would relate to both scale and depth in terms of positive youth engagement in activities where the benefits accrue to people other than the actor and their immediate associates (with an emphasis on people in less advantaged social positions). Applicants are encouraged to define how their proposal achieves this, what is most important to measure and where on the spectrum of scale and depth they are deciding to focus. What the most effective forms of engagement are will vary depending on their context.

In terms of how to measure the effectiveness of positive engagement, scale, or total reach, could be measured by the total number of youth involved, online and offline, who are made aware of an issue. This must then link to the positive change it helps create, in terms of behavior, for example. Depth could be measured by the types engagement young people undertake. This could be through volunteering or organizing events, or using sports or creativity to involve youth in decisions that affect them in partnership with community leaders. These are illustrative examples. Investigators should make the case for what they believe will have the most positive, sustained impact, why this is the case, and how their proposal will help achieve this.

What we will consider funding:

Proposals that:

  • Address the Challenge by showing how they will lead to actions taken by young people that will positively impact one or more of the first six Global Goals.
  • Outline concepts that have the potential to be scaled up.
  • Focus on learning and gathering data and evidence about how to do positively engage youth by doing that effectively, rather than trying to go for scale or solely developing research.
  • Have the potential for scale and depth at reasonable costs.
  • Focus on a specific geography or community, but should link to efforts beyond that locality.
  • There are no geographic constraints as to where in the world proposals should be focused.
  • Are entirely online and technology-based, or blended technology and face-to-face, or predominantly offline, with limited use of technology.
  • Explain how the activities proposed will lead to the results expected, based wherever possible on experience and data
  • Show how the proposed concept or program could in the future achieve the scale and depth of engagement with a clear set of measurements at the pilot stage.
  • Describe the innovative approach captured by the concept. The initial pilot project must test the concept at some minimal scale that produces data upon which decisions for future funding could be made.

What we will not consider funding:

Proposals that:

  • Require more funds than the US$100,000, or more than 12-18 months to demonstrate success
  • Lack a robust implementation plan or organization.
  • Lack a complete, coherent design for how it will work.
  • Don’t focus on Global Goals other than 1 – 6 (these may be subject of future challenges).
  • Do not address the challenge.
  • Have no capacity for scale in the future.

https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/activating-global-citizenship-building-next-generation-global-citizens-global-goals
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/02/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


HE CHALLENGE

The Misk Foundation and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aim to empower the youth and prepare them for success in the future knowledge economy. Great opportunities exist as technologies and industries advance faster than ever before. But disruptive technologies, such as artificial intelligence, also present challenges. Industries will undergo major transformations and according to the McKinsey Global Institute, approximately half of all jobs today may be lost to automation across the developing and developed world. Moreover, major societal issues that face humanity, such as inequality and climate change, continue to spread in a complex manner.

To prepare the youth to adapt and thrive in this uncertain future, and eventually solve these major societal issues, we need to help them develop new 21st century skills and competencies. Knowledge will still be important. But critical thinking skills, such as creativity and complex decision making, will be even more important. Leadership and social skills, including working cohesively with others and collaborating across borders, will be critical. As will the ability to quickly understand complex information, learn to use it, and adapt. All of these skills paired with character traits and competencies such as grit and courage will determine success in the future.

This time we must ensure every single child, regardless of where they live, receives a quality 21st century education. In 2015 at the UN Summit, the global community agreed to strive for a quality education for every child by 2030. As such, the fourth of seventeen Sustainable Development Goals to transform the world is focused on quality education for all. But we must ensure that quality includes more than just 20th century learning objectives such as reading and writing, and also includes all the 21st century skills and competencies that are necessary for success in the knowledge economy.

Preparing the youth with a quality 21st century education will be difficult since the current school systems throughout the world are struggling to even achieve basic learning outcomes. According to UNESCO, 4 in 10 Grade 4 children across the globe fail to meet minimum learning standards. In line with this, the World Bank recently declared a global learning crisis, reporting that 617 million school-aged children are not reaching minimum proficiency levels in reading and math. For example, in rural parts of India, basic skills such as two-digit subtraction are still beyond half of all Grade 5 students.

Therefore, we must think beyond incremental improvements and completely transform schools, starting with the teachers and school leaders that run them. Research, including that of John Hattie, renown Professor of Education, shows that teachers are the number one driver of learning in the school. However, teachers must change as the curriculum evolves with the needs of the 21st century. The curriculum of the 20th century was subject-based and weighted towards memorizing facts. Whereas modern curriculum is now being injected with new 21st century skills and competencies that can only be taught through exploration, practice, and feedback. Therefore, the role of teachers and the systems around them must be reinvented. Education must become more student-centered and models of learning must become active. And since teaching is primarily driven by the school leader’s direction, the school leadership must change as well.

Preparing the youth across the world to thrive in the future knowledge economy is a daunting challenge, but one that must be and can be solved. The future is being defined by disruptive technologies. Therefore, disruptive approaches need to be applied to the education system. The only constant is that teachers and school leaders will remain to be the drivers of learning and therefore must be central to this change. Incremental improvement will not be enough. We must leapfrog the challenges of today and transform teachers and school leadership to solve the challenges of the future.

What we are looking for:

We are looking for new innovative ideas that transform teaching or school leadership to better prepare children with the 21st century skills they need to succeed in the future. Modern 21st century skills, such as problem solving, leadership, creativity, and adaptability, require a new active, student-centered system for learning. We seek ideas that better prepare teachers and school leaders to drive this new active 21st century system for learning.

We are looking for new ideas that may just be in an ideation stage or may have been tested in a small scale already, but require up to US$100,000 to demonstrate their theory of change and potential for impact. Proposals that are selected to receive an initial funding of US$100,000 and go on to demonstrate success will receive further funding to scale up and impact lives across the world.

Ideas may cover one or more of the following areas that impact teaching and/or school leadership:

  • Reinventing the recruitment process how can schools attract the best people for the role? How are the people with the highest potential identified and selected?
  • Transforming training and professional development how are new recruits prepared with essential basic skills? How is their craft further refined and enhanced over time? How is technology used to support growth? What other resources or tools be used to enhance development? How can mentoring and collaboration be leveraged more?
  • Improving resources that support high-quality learning how can technology improve performance? How can teaching aids be transformed in line with learning 21st century skills? What other new resources can teachers leverage to improve lesson delivery?
  • New forms of management how can new management systems and practices maximize performance? How can monitoring and incentives be effectively implemented?
  • Any other area that drastically improves the performance of teachers and school leaders in line with the new competency-based curriculum of the future

What we will consider funding:

All proposals must:

  • Be aligned with the challenge outlined above and greatly improve teaching and/or school leadership
  • Improve the quality of learning with regards to 21st century skills for children around the world
  • Outline the design of the solution to clearly explain how it will work
  • Have a plan for using the US$100,000 in 12-18 months to advance the solution.
  • Have an implementation plan to ensure the solution is successfully delivered, including a plan for a strong leadership team and implementing organization
  • Have a logical path to scale to help millions of children in an efficient manner. This includes measures for maintaining a lean approach and replicating whilst maintaining quality In addition, proposals will be prioritized if they:
    • Are novel and deploy a unique approach or innovative method to solving the problem
    • Have a path toward sustainability either through private or government funding
    • Show a deep understanding of the education system in which they operate and outline ideas for integration, that leverages the rest of the system, for greater impact

What we will not consider funding:

Proposals that:

  • Do not address the challenge. We will not fund proposals that do not have a direct impact on teachers, school leaders, or the human capital in schools. For example, we will not fund proposals that focus on other areas of schooling such as physical infrastructure or assessments
  • Do not impact the development of 21st century skills. We will not fund proposals that only improve learning for traditional academic subjects
  • Lack a complete, coherent design for how the solution will work. We will not fund unclear ideas. We will not fund proposals that merely explore the issue and do not have a clear solution
  • Do not have a financial plan or have a plan that exceeds US$100,000. We will not fund ideas that require more than US$100,000 or more than 12-18 months to demonstrate success
  • Lack a robust implementation plan or organization. We will not fund proposals that have no plan for demonstrating their concept
  • Have no clear path to scaling. We will not fund proposals that have no reasonable idea for helping millions of children in an efficient manner

https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/reinventing-teaching-and-school-leadership-preparing-youth-21st-century-skills-needed
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/11/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Apply via the AAS Grants Management System (Ishango)

The African Academy of Sciences (AAS), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are partnering under the auspices of the Coalition of African Research & Innovation (CARI) to establish a post-doctoral training fellowship program, the African Postdoctoral Training Initiative (APTI).  Training will be at a world class institute, the intramural laboratories of NIH.

APTI fellows will train in a global health research area of priority for their home institutions and countries, and AAS, BMGF and NIH, while building bridges and lasting connections between the partner organizations and African scientists and institutions. While at the NIH, the fellows must be on leave or sabbatical from their home institution under the NIH Intramural Visiting Fellow Program (https://policymanual.nih.gov/2300-320-3). The research priority areas are in infectious diseases, nutrition, and reproductive, maternal, and child health and developing skills for clinical and translational research. More information available

APTI fellows will be expected to lead important research programs in their home countries and institutions. After successful completion of the two-year postdoctoral fellowship, trainees will be provided with 50% salary support for an additional two years to assist their transition into independent researchers.

The main objective of APTI is to train a cadre of African scientists so they return to their home institutions and become scientific leaders in their community, help solve Africa’s challenges in global health and development, and in turn become trainers of the next generation. A key ingredient is a focus on the home institutions. As such, APTI expects commitment from home institutions to provide a conducive research environment and dedicated research time for the fellows upon their return home. APTI fellows are expected to be a part of an African regional and global web of collaborations connecting to their home institutions. APTI fellows will be linked to an existing African and global scientific networks and are expected to nurture these scientific collaborations and relationships.

Candidate requirements:

  • Must be citizens of and currently employed in an academic, research, or government position in an African country.
  • Must have a relevant doctoral degree (e.g., PhD, MD, MBBS) awarded no more than 15 years earlier.
  • Must have less than 5 years of relevant research experience by their entry on duty date at NIH.

Selection criteria:

  • Professional merit, scientific ability, and potential future career impact (based on CV, letter of interest, and two reference letters).
  • Assurance and availability of resources from the home institution for a designated, funded research position for the postdoc upon completion of their fellowship (expressed in letter from director/head of research of home institution).
  • Commitment to return to their home country following completion of training (expressed in a letter of interest).
  • A selection committee will ensure the best match of outstanding candidates and NIH laboratory positions. Additional selection factors may include diversity in scientific research areas, geographic origin, and gender.

Applications open: April 11, 2018

Application deadline: May 11,

Final selection: June 1, 2018

APTI fellows must be prepared to begin their fellowship at NIH no later than September 30, 2018.

Apply via the AAS Grants Management System (Ishango)


http://www.aasciences.ac.ke/aesa/en/programmes/the-african-postdoctoral-training-initiative-/
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/11/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $49,000,000.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


U.S. Agency for International Development, Bureau for Food Security (USAID/BFS)

Call for Concept Notes for Feed the Future Strengthening Agricultural Innovation Capacities

 

Addendum to APS 7200AA18APS00003 Deadline for Written Questions: 04/20/2018 at 5:00 p.m. EDT

Deadline for Submission: 05/11/2018 at 5:00 p.m. EDT

“To realize the full potential of agricultural innovation, USAID/BFS is soliciting Concept Notes that propose cutting-edge approaches to:

1)     strengthen the capacity of relevant host-country organizations to act as “innovation brokers”—critical connectors in a network of actors that facilitate downstream and upstream partnerships to research, test, and scale new or improved technologies or practices;

2)     conduct analysis and research on effective approaches and best practices for facilitating capacity development for agricultural innovation;

3)     establish a self-sustaining community of practice to reduce transaction costs and promote best practices for strengthening agricultural innovation capacity across Feed the Future Innovation Labs and host-country partners, including universities, national and regional research institutes, private sector firms, extension organizations, and other relevant organizations; and

4)     provide technical assistance on applying best practices for strengthening agricultural innovation capacity to USAID Missions and other Operating Units.”

 

Eligibility: “This Addendum is open to individual entities and consortia of entities in partnership. Consortia may be composed of any combination of public, private, for-profit, and nonprofit organizations, higher education institutions, public international organizations, non-governmental organizations, US and non-US governmental organizations, multilateral and international donor organizations.”

 

If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Franklin Cooper Contracting/agreement Specialist Phone 202 567 5017

fcooper@usaid.gov

 

Note: This is not a USDA/NIFA award opportunity but we are providing information on this global engagement opportunity as a service to our stakeholders.


https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=303015
Posted: 04/16/2018

Deadline: 05/16/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Appropriate antibiotic use has the power to save lives in the most vulnerable communities, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) impacts multiple global health priority areas: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, maternal and neonatal health, pneumonia, and enteric and diarrheal diseases. It is critical to better understand the prevalence of AMR and its impact on mortality in developing countries so that access to appropriate antibiotics is ensured while inappropriate use of antibiotics is limited. In particular, there is a need to better understand resistance in bacterial infections of newborns and young children – and to this end, understanding what is the prevalence of AMR in the community, how it impacts mortality, and how it impacts health targets. Tackling AMR will require a global, coordinated approach and the linking together of different research communities for new perspectives on the problem.

Note that this request for proposals is being launched on sequential dates by four Grand Challenges partnerships: African researchers located in African organizations should apply through the joint Grand Challenges Africa/Grand Challenges South Africa portal; Brazilian researchers located in Brazilian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges Brazil portal; and Indian researchers located in Indian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges India portal.

What we are looking for:

We seek new approaches that have the potential to transform public health action on a regional or global scale by identifying and filling gaps in knowledge on the burden of resistance to antibacterial agents – we are not seeking incremental improvements in typical disease surveillance solutions. Specifically, we seek projects that propose innovation in the following areas:

  • Data sources: Pilot tests of new sources of data, particularly those that would bring together different research communities for new perspectives on the problem
  • Analytical methods: Pilot tests of bioinformatics approaches, including those that combine or connect existing databases in novel ways
  • Biomarkers: Pilot tests of new biomarkers or combinations of biomarkers that could lead to new understanding of the actionable implications of antimicrobial resistance surveillance data
  • Low-cost technologies and products: Exploratory work in developing new technologies and products, including 1) those that specifically target improved infection prevention and control in healthcare settings to reduce reliance on healthcare provider behavior change, and 2) technologies to remove antibiotics from effluents

We will give highest priority to those projects that:

  • Pilot test approaches that could be added to existing surveillance platforms, since we are not seeking to create new surveillance platforms
  • Incorporate multiple of the areas of innovation listed above
  • Could contribute to a portfolio of funded projects that addresses a country’s regional diversity and the diversity of vulnerable populations
  • Explain how proposed approaches will be tested so that they have the highest likelihood of being relevant for implementation in the country’s public health system

Examples of what we are looking for:

  • Characterizes type examples of the burden of AMR (e.g., exploring the role of AMR in community or hospital sepsis-related mortality, focusing on children)
  • Includes data sources that could indirectly reflect AMR burden (e.g., antimicrobial usage patterns or specifically how vaccination against respiratory or diarrheal diseases impacts antimicrobial use)
  • Addresses the diversity of vulnerable populations and the different aspects of the AMR burden that might be reflected in urban versus rural settings
  • Includes data sources ranging from the level of the individual (e.g., microbiome across body sites) to the community (e.g., public toilets and sanitation systems), while maintaining a focus on gaining new understanding of the actionable consequences of AMR gene flow.
  • Includes data sources that could reflect AMR transmission dynamics between communities (e.g., modes of transportation) or within communities over time (e.g., seasonal-related behaviors)
  • Provides an ecological perspective, such as a One Health perspective integrating antimicrobial use in livestock or perspectives that can integrate environmental monitoring in the community setting with medical monitoring in the hospital setting – if these perspectives are explicitly linked to human health outcomes and particularly a focus on vulnerable populations
  • Leverages opportunities to build in new ways on existing public health interventions or environmental monitoring platforms - and to bring together different research communities
  • Contributes to control of infections in healthcare settings: novel techniques and products to control hospital infection rates and break the chain of transmission of bacteria in clinical settings
  • Exploratory work into developing low-cost technologies to remove antibiotics and associated chemicals from effluents

We will NOT consider funding for:

  • Proposals to develop diagnostic devices and technologies or for drug discovery. Although diagnostic devices and new drugs are potentially critical to AMR solutions, these areas are not unique to AMR challenges and should therefore be advanced more comprehensively against a broader landscape of possible needs and solutions. Thus, while excluded here, they may be part of a future request for proposals.
  • Proposals without a clear application to surveillance or facilitating the development of new evidence describing the global burden of AMR
  • Proposals seeking to apply existing tools in ways that do not transform our understanding of the global emergence or spread of AMR
  • Incremental improvements to conventional solutions or typical disease surveillance. We will not consider local surveillance programs or projects or small improvements in surveillance, e.g., use of mobile data collection, automation of traditional processes, or improving access to existing tools or technologies.
  • Proposals that simply expand the availability of primary data without a clear link to informing our understanding of global AMR epidemiology
  • Applications proposing basic research
  • Ideas not directly relevant to low- and middle-income contexts
  • Genomic and other laboratory-based approaches that lack a clear application to AMR surveillance or epidemiology
  • Ideas focused on quantifying resistance in animal or livestock populations or in environmental samples without a direct linkage to how data would impact public health practice
  • Proposals involving clinical trials in human volunteers or patients (note: use of existing datasets or other outputs from clinical trials may be considered, as long as the proposed approach is feasible within the time and financial envelopes provided).

APPLY HERE


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/grand-challenges-south-africa-new-approaches-characterize-global-burden-antimicrobial
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/23/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $35,000,000.00
Funding Agency(s): U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)


The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is seeking applications for a cooperative agreement from qualified U.S. colleges and universites to fund a program entitled Feed the Future Innovation Lab on Fish ("Fish Innovation Lab). Eligibility for this award is restricted to U.S. colleges and universities as defined under Section 296(d) of Title XII of the FAA. See Section C.I. of the attached pdf for eligibility requirements. 

Started in 2010, the Feed the Future Initiative works to sustainably reduce global poverty and hunger, recognizing the need to increase global agricultural production significantly by the year 2050 to provide sufficient nutritious food for the world's growing population. The Global Food Security Act (GFSA) builds on what we've learned through Feed the Future and reflects changes in the global context since its launch. The signature, top-line goal of the GFSA is to sustainbly reduce global hunger, malnutrition and poverty. On September 30, 2016, USAID submitted to Congress a new whole-of-governemnt strategy for global food security, the Global Food Security Strategy (GFSS), on behlaf of the 11 USG agencies responsible for carrying out the GFSA. The GFSS sets out how to achieve this goal through the primary objectives of inclusive and sustainable agriculture-led economic growth, strengthened resilience among people and systems, and a well-nourished population. Technical guidance as to how the U.S. Government approaches global food security in its development activities can be found on-line at https://feedthefuture.gov/lp/guidance-and-tools-global-food-security-programs.

To meet the challenge of producing more and nutritious food with fewer natural resources while also adopting to increasingly erratic weather patterns and market price swings, the international community will need to fully harness the benefits of agricultural science and technology. The U.S. Governments Global Food Security Research Strategy directs research investments to toward three major themes: 

  • Technologies and practices that advance the productivity frontier to drive income growth, improve diets and promote natural resource conservation. 
  • Technologies and practices that reduce, manage and mitigate risk to support resilient, prosperous, well-nourished individuals, households and communities; and
  • Improved knowledge of how to achieve human outcomes: generating evidence on how to sustainably and equitably improve economic opportunity, nutrition and resilience

To achieve the goals of this research strategy, centrally-funded research programs link global, regional, and national research partners to identify and adapt promising methodologies and technologies for local farming systems, and to itensify and diversify major production systems where the poor and undernourished are concentrated. Agricultural transformation requires approaching improvement through a systems approach that integrates advances in soil fertility, genetics, animal science, water management, market access, policies, and nutrition. Fish can attribute to addressing transformations in agricultural and food systems due to their broad range of potential benefits, such as by providing nutrient-dense foods. Investments in the use of fish in agricultural and food systems can contribute to gains in incomes and nutrition of small-scale producer households through consumption and sale of fish as food, while improvements contribute to improved productivity of other fish. Addition of fish to diverse systems can help manage both economic and environmental risks. 

Aquatic products from aquaculture and fisheries can provide important protein, nutrients, fats, and micronutrients that can create multiple benefits towards food security goals. Investments in aquaculture and fisheries value chains can contribue to gains in incomes and nutrition of small-scale producer and low-income consumer households through consumption and sale of fish. To address these issues, transforming and improving agricultural and livestock production systems is a priority for Feed the Future in GFSS. 

This NFO is designed to identify and launch a new Feed the Future Innovation Lab focused on aquaculture and fisheries research and capacity development at the smallholder and food systems levels. 

Please see the attached pdf for more details. 

7200AA18RFA00006 NFO-Final.pdf


https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=7200AA18RFA00006
Posted: 02/26/2018

Deadline: 05/25/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Appropriate antibiotic use has the power to save lives in the most vulnerable communities, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) impacts multiple global health priority areas: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, maternal and neonatal health, pneumonia, and enteric and diarrheal diseases. It is critical to better understand the prevalence of AMR and its impact on mortality in developing countries so that access to appropriate antibiotics is ensured while inappropriate use of antibiotics is limited. In particular, there is a need to better understand resistance in bacterial infections of newborns and young children – and to this end, understanding what is the prevalence of AMR in the community, how it impacts mortality, and how it impacts health targets. Tackling AMR will require a global, coordinated approach and the linking together of different research communities for new perspectives on the problem.

What we are looking for:

We seek new approaches that have the potential to transform public health action on a regional or global scale by identifying and filling gaps in knowledge on the burden of resistance to antibacterial agents – we are not seeking incremental improvements in typical disease surveillance solutions. Specifically, we seek projects that propose innovation in the following areas:

  • Data sources: Pilot tests of new sources of data, particularly those that would bring together different research communities for new perspectives on the problem
  • Analytical methods: Pilot tests of bioinformatics approaches, including those that combine or connect existing databases in novel ways
  • Biomarkers: Pilot tests of new biomarkers or combinations of biomarkers that could lead to new understanding of the actionable implications of antimicrobial resistance surveillance data
  • Low-cost technologies and products: Exploratory work in developing new technologies and products, including 1) those that specifically target improved infection prevention and control in healthcare settings to reduce reliance on healthcare provider behavior change, and 2) technologies to remove antibiotics from effluents

We will give highest priority to those projects that:

  • Pilot test approaches that could be added to existing surveillance platforms, since we are not seeking to create new surveillance platforms
  • Incorporate multiple of the areas of innovation listed above
  • Could contribute to a portfolio of funded projects that addresses a country’s regional diversity and the diversity of vulnerable populations
  • Explain how proposed approaches will be tested so that they have the highest likelihood of being relevant for implementation in the country’s public health system

Examples of what we are looking for:

  • Characterizes type examples of the burden of AMR (e.g., exploring the role of AMR in community or hospital sepsis-related mortality, focusing on children)
  • Includes data sources that could indirectly reflect AMR burden (e.g., antimicrobial usage patterns or specifically how vaccination against respiratory or diarrheal diseases impacts antimicrobial use)
  • Addresses the diversity of vulnerable populations and the different aspects of the AMR burden that might be reflected in urban versus rural settings
  • Includes data sources ranging from the level of the individual (e.g., microbiome across body sites) to the community (e.g., public toilets and sanitation systems), while maintaining a focus on gaining new understanding of the actionable consequences of AMR gene flow.
  • Includes data sources that could reflect AMR transmission dynamics between communities (e.g., modes of transportation) or within communities over time (e.g., seasonal-related behaviors)
  • Provides an ecological perspective, such as a One Health perspective integrating antimicrobial use in livestock or perspectives that can integrate environmental monitoring in the community setting with medical monitoring in the hospital setting – if these perspectives are explicitly linked to human health outcomes and particularly a focus on vulnerable populations
  • Leverages opportunities to build in new ways on existing public health interventions or environmental monitoring platforms - and to bring together different research communities
  • Contributes to control of infections in healthcare settings: novel techniques and products to control hospital infection rates and break the chain of transmission of bacteria in clinical settings
  • Exploratory work into developing low-cost technologies to remove antibiotics and associated chemicals from effluents

We will NOT consider funding for:

  • Proposals to develop diagnostic devices and technologies or for drug discovery. Although diagnostic devices and new drugs are potentially critical to AMR solutions, these areas are not unique to AMR challenges and should therefore be advanced more comprehensively against a broader landscape of possible needs and solutions. Thus, while excluded here, they may be part of a future request for proposals.
  • Proposals without a clear application to surveillance or facilitating the development of new evidence describing the global burden of AMR
  • Proposals seeking to apply existing tools in ways that do not transform our understanding of the global emergence or spread of AMR
  • Incremental improvements to conventional solutions or typical disease surveillance. We will not consider local surveillance programs or projects or small improvements in surveillance, e.g., use of mobile data collection, automation of traditional processes, or improving access to existing tools or technologies.
  • Proposals that simply expand the availability of primary data without a clear link to informing our understanding of global AMR epidemiology
  • Applications proposing basic research
  • Ideas not directly relevant to low- and middle-income contexts
  • Genomic and other laboratory-based approaches that lack a clear application to AMR surveillance or epidemiology
  • Ideas focused on quantifying resistance in animal or livestock populations or in environmental samples without a direct linkage to how data would impact public health practice
  • Proposals involving clinical trials in human volunteers or patients (note: use of existing datasets or other outputs from clinical trials may be considered, as long as the proposed approach is feasible within the time and financial envelopes provided).

Note that this request for proposals is being launched in parallel by four Grand Challenges partnerships: African researchers located in African organizations should apply through the joint Grand Challenges Africa/Grand Challenges South Africa portal; Brazilian researchers located in Brazilian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges Brazil portal; and Indian researchers located in Indian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges India portal.

APPLY HERE


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/grand-challenges-india-new-approaches-characterize-global-burden-antimicrobial-resistance
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/28/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Appropriate antibiotic use has the power to save lives in the most vulnerable communities, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) impacts multiple global health priority areas: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, maternal and neonatal health, pneumonia, and enteric and diarrheal diseases. It is critical to better understand the prevalence of AMR and its impact on mortality in developing countries so that access to appropriate antibiotics is ensured while inappropriate use of antibiotics is limited. In particular, there is a need to better understand resistance in bacterial infections of newborns and young children – and to this end, understanding what is the prevalence of AMR in the community, how it impacts mortality, and how it impacts health targets. Tackling AMR will require a global, coordinated approach and the linking together of different research communities for new perspectives on the problem.

Note that this request for proposals is being launched on sequential dates by four Grand Challenges partnerships: African researchers located in African organizations should apply through the joint Grand Challenges Africa/Grand Challenges South Africa portal; Brazilian researchers located in Brazilian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges Brazil portal; and Indian researchers located in Indian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges India portal.

What we are looking for:

We seek new approaches that have the potential to transform public health action on a regional or global scale by identifying and filling gaps in knowledge on the burden of resistance to antibacterial agents – we are not seeking incremental improvements in typical disease surveillance solutions. Specifically, we seek projects that propose innovation in the following areas:

  • Data sources: Pilot tests of new sources of data, particularly those that would bring together different research communities from different disciplines for new perspectives on the problem
  • Analytical methods: Pilot tests of bioinformatics approaches, including new ways to analyze, combine or connect existing databases
  • Biomarkers: Pilot tests of new biomarkers or combinations of biomarkers that could lead to new understanding of the actionable implications of antimicrobial resistance surveillance data
  • Low-cost technologies and products: Exploratory work in developing new technologies and products, including 1) those that specifically target improved infection prevention and control in healthcare settings to reduce reliance on healthcare provider behavior change, and 2) technologies to remove antibiotics from effluents

We will give highest priority to those projects that:

  • Pilot test approaches that could be added to existing surveillance platforms, since we are not seeking to create new surveillance platforms
  • Incorporate multiple of the areas of innovation listed above
  • Could contribute to a portfolio of funded projects that addresses a country’s regional diversity and the diversity of vulnerable populations
  • Explain how proposed approaches will be tested so that they have the highest likelihood of being relevant for implementation in the country’s public health system

Examples of what we are looking for:

  • Characterizes type examples of the burden of AMR (e.g., exploring the role of AMR in community or hospital sepsis-related mortality, focusing on children)
  • Includes data sources that could indirectly reflect AMR burden (e.g., antimicrobial usage patterns or specifically how vaccination against respiratory or diarrheal diseases impacts antimicrobial use)
  • Addresses the diversity of vulnerable populations and the different aspects of the AMR burden that might be reflected in urban versus rural settings
  • Includes data sources ranging from the level of the individual (e.g., microbiome across body sites) to the community (e.g., public toilets and sanitation systems), while maintaining a focus on gaining new understanding of the actionable consequences of AMR gene flow.
  • Includes data sources that could reflect AMR transmission dynamics between communities (e.g., modes of transportation) or within communities over time (e.g., seasonal-related behaviors)
  • Provides an ecological perspective, such as a One Health perspective integrating antimicrobial use in livestock or perspectives that can integrate environmental monitoring in the community setting with medical monitoring in the hospital setting – if these perspectives are explicitly linked to human health outcomes and particularly a focus on vulnerable populations
  • Leverages opportunities to build in new ways on existing public health interventions or environmental monitoring platforms - and to bring together different research communities
  • Contributes to control of infections in healthcare settings: novel techniques and products to control hospital infection rates and break the chain of transmission of bacteria in clinical settings
  • Exploratory work into developing low-cost technologies to remove antibiotics and associated chemicals from effluents

We will NOT consider funding for:

  • Proposals to develop diagnostic devices and technologies or for drug discovery. Although diagnostic devices and new drugs are potentially critical to AMR solutions, these areas are not unique to AMR challenges and should therefore be advanced more comprehensively against a broader landscape of possible needs and solutions. Thus, while excluded here, they may be part of a future request for proposals.
  • Proposals without a clear application to surveillance or facilitating the development of new evidence describing the global burden of AMR
  • Proposals seeking to apply existing tools in ways that do not transform our understanding of the global emergence or spread of AMR
  • Incremental improvements to conventional solutions or typical disease surveillance. We will not consider local surveillance programs or projects or small improvements in surveillance, e.g., use of mobile data collection, automation of traditional processes, or improving access to existing tools or technologies.
  • Proposals that simply expand the availability of primary data without a clear link to informing our understanding of global AMR epidemiology
  • Applications proposing basic research
  • Ideas not directly relevant to low- and middle-income contexts
  • Genomic and other laboratory-based approaches that lack a clear application to AMR surveillance or epidemiology
  • Ideas focused on quantifying resistance in animal or livestock populations or in environmental samples without a direct linkage to how data would impact public health practice
  • Proposals involving clinical trials in human volunteers or patients (note: use of existing datasets or other outputs from clinical trials may be considered, as long as the proposed approach is feasible within the time and financial envelopes provided).

https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/grand-challenges-brazil-new-approaches-characterize-global-burden-antimicrobial-resistance
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/29/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


Appropriate antibiotic use has the power to save lives in the most vulnerable communities, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) impacts multiple global health priority areas: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, maternal and neonatal health, pneumonia, and enteric and diarrheal diseases. It is critical to better understand the prevalence of AMR and its impact on mortality in developing countries so that access to appropriate antibiotics is ensured while inappropriate use of antibiotics is limited. In particular, there is a need to better understand resistance in bacterial infections of newborns and young children – and to this end, understanding what is the prevalence of AMR in the community, how it impacts mortality, and how it impacts health targets. Tackling AMR will require a global, coordinated approach and the linking together of different research communities for new perspectives on the problem.

Note that this request for proposals is being launched on sequential dates by four Grand Challenges partnerships: African researchers located in African organizations should apply through the joint Grand Challenges Africa/Grand Challenges South Africa portal; Brazilian researchers located in Brazilian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges Brazil portal; and Indian researchers located in Indian organizations should apply through the Grand Challenges India portal.

What we are looking for:

We seek new approaches that have the potential to transform public health action on a regional or global scale by identifying and filling gaps in knowledge on the burden of resistance to antibacterial agents – we are not seeking incremental improvements in typical disease surveillance solutions. Specifically, we seek projects that propose innovation in the following areas:

  • Data sources: Pilot tests of new sources of data, particularly those that would bring together different research communities for new perspectives on the problem
  • Analytical methods: Pilot tests of bioinformatics approaches, including those that combine or connect existing databases in novel ways
  • Biomarkers: Pilot tests of new biomarkers or combinations of biomarkers that could lead to new understanding of the actionable implications of antimicrobial resistance surveillance data
  • Low-cost technologies and products: Exploratory work in developing new technologies and products, including 1) those that specifically target improved infection prevention and control in healthcare settings to reduce reliance on healthcare provider behavior change, and 2) technologies to remove antibiotics from effluents

We will give highest priority to those projects that:

  • Pilot test approaches that could be added to existing surveillance platforms, since we are not seeking to create new surveillance platforms
  • Incorporate multiple of the areas of innovation listed above
  • Could contribute to a portfolio of funded projects that addresses a country’s regional diversity and the diversity of vulnerable populations
  • Explain how proposed approaches will be tested so that they have the highest likelihood of being relevant for implementation in the country’s public health system

Examples of what we are looking for:

  • Characterizes type examples of the burden of AMR (e.g., exploring the role of AMR in community or hospital sepsis-related mortality, focusing on children)
  • Includes data sources that could indirectly reflect AMR burden (e.g., antimicrobial usage patterns or specifically how vaccination against respiratory or diarrheal diseases impacts antimicrobial use)
  • Addresses the diversity of vulnerable populations and the different aspects of the AMR burden that might be reflected in urban versus rural settings
  • Includes data sources ranging from the level of the individual (e.g., microbiome across body sites) to the community (e.g., public toilets and sanitation systems), while maintaining a focus on gaining new understanding of the actionable consequences of AMR gene flow.
  • Includes data sources that could reflect AMR transmission dynamics between communities (e.g., modes of transportation) or within communities over time (e.g., seasonal-related behaviors)
  • Provides an ecological perspective, such as a One Health perspective integrating antimicrobial use in livestock or perspectives that can integrate environmental monitoring in the community setting with medical monitoring in the hospital setting – if these perspectives are explicitly linked to human health outcomes and particularly a focus on vulnerable populations
  • Leverages opportunities to build in new ways on existing public health interventions or environmental monitoring platforms - and to bring together different research communities
  • Contributes to control of infections in healthcare settings: novel techniques and products to control hospital infection rates and break the chain of transmission of bacteria in clinical settings
  • Exploratory work into developing low-cost technologies to remove antibiotics and associated chemicals from effluents

We will NOT consider funding for:

  • Proposals to develop diagnostic devices and technologies or for drug discovery. Although diagnostic devices and new drugs are potentially critical to AMR solutions, these areas are not unique to AMR challenges and should therefore be advanced more comprehensively against a broader landscape of possible needs and solutions. Thus, while excluded here, they may be part of a future request for proposals.
  • Proposals without a clear application to surveillance or facilitating the development of new evidence describing the global burden of AMR
  • Proposals seeking to apply existing tools in ways that do not transform our understanding of the global emergence or spread of AMR
  • Incremental improvements to conventional solutions or typical disease surveillance. We will not consider local surveillance programs or projects or small improvements in surveillance, e.g., use of mobile data collection, automation of traditional processes, or improving access to existing tools or technologies.
  • Proposals that simply expand the availability of primary data without a clear link to informing our understanding of global AMR epidemiology
  • Applications proposing basic research
  • Ideas not directly relevant to low- and middle-income contexts
  • Genomic and other laboratory-based approaches that lack a clear application to AMR surveillance or epidemiology
  • Ideas focused on quantifying resistance in animal or livestock populations or in environmental samples without a direct linkage to how data would impact public health practice
  • Proposals involving clinical trials in human volunteers or patients (note: use of existing datasets or other outputs from clinical trials may be considered, as long as the proposed approach is feasible within the time and financial envelopes provided).

APPLY HERE


https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/grand-challenges-africa-new-approaches-characterize-global-burden-antimicrobial-resistance
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 05/30/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $35,000,000.00
Funding Agency(s): U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)


USAID has just made available a new request for applications to lead the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Legume Systems Research. This is a five year cooperative agreement, with up to $35 million dollars.
?
The agreement is set up to provide up to $3 million per year for the “Leader” institution from central Bureau of Food Security funding. USAID missions, regional bureaus, and other agencies can provide the remaining funding up to the maximum.

The key objectives for this lead institution are to develop “… a portfolio of research and capacity-development activities to fulfill the following two objectives:

       • Generate and make available for transfer improved knowledge, technologies, and practices
          that unlock the potential of legume crops in Feed the Future countries to:

              o improve food security and nutrition for the poor,
              o sustainably enhance the resilience of smallholder farming households, and
              o create and sustain inclusive economic growth.

      • Build partner-country capacity to independently generate and transfer legume-related
         knowledge, technologies, and practices to beneficiaries after the conclusion of USAID
         funded activities.

Details on the RFA can be found on the website link below. 

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=302334&_cldee=bWJyb3Vzc2FyZEBuaWZhLnVzZGEuZ292&recipientid=contact-8256a2806787e7118113fc15b4286c00-585113f7c3824339992f99181c38f2d0&esid=e915a68f-4f34-e811-8129-fc15b4286c00
Posted: 04/02/2018

Deadline: 05/31/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Others


The American Council on Education is offering various forms of support for faculty interested in collaborating with partners in Japan to teach online courses. 
 
The application deadline is May 31
 
ACE is offering a complimentary informational webinar about the program on April 24 at 12:00-1:00. For those who have a time conflict (such as the Global Engagement Expo!), the presentation will also be available on ACE's website afterwards. 
 
Here are some basics about the US-Japan COIL Initiative:
Representatives of selected institutions will participate in a 3-day course development workshop with their Japanese counterparts in October 2018 in Washington, DC. Workshop expenses, including transportation and hotel, will be covered under terms of the award. Selected institutions will receive a limited number of faculty development stipends. Travel stipends are available for a limited number of students enrolled in one of the new COIL courses to use toward education abroad in Japan.
 
The U.S.-Japan COIL Initiative is designed to test the idea that students who participate in COIL courses will increase their understanding of the partner country, sharpen their cultural competency skills, and become better prepared for in-person education exchange. If successful, ACE aims to expand the program to include additional U.S. and Japanese partner institutions.

http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/US-Japan_COIL_Initiative.aspx?_cldee=YmFpbGlhbkBuY3N1LmVkdQ%3d%3d&recipientid=contact-0dabc869d81ae511ac970050569e5b20-67f3b04a327b4205ac3d08359a1d9cd6&utm_source=ClickDimensions&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CIGE-USJP&esid=ccb261d5-ef3c-e811-80f6-005056869ffc
Posted: 04/16/2018

Deadline: 06/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $10,000.00
Funding Agency(s): North Carolina State University


This fund supports international activities leading to research collaborations between researchers at the University Global Partnership Network’s partner institutions. Network members are top universities around the world including The University of São Paulo in Brazil, University of Surrey in the United Kingdom and The University of Wollongong in Australia.

The annual fund of $240,000 has supported 46 international research projects to date. Awards support substantive engagement that leads to high-quality outputs — such as international research training for graduate students or early career faculty, publication of joint papers from collaborative research, or joint research bids.

The call for Research Collaboration Fund proposals for 2018 is now open.

NC State faculty and staff are invited to submit their proposals to the 2018 Research Collaboration Fund. The call is open to full-time academic staff. Collaborations can be bi-lateral, tri-lateral or quadrilateral. Funding of up to $10,000 is available per university partner per project. By way of illustration, an award for a bi-lateral project would provide funding of $20,000 in total. Funding is available for one calendar year.

Applicants are advised to read the guidance notes before submitting an application. All proposals should include a cover page, a description of the research project, a detailed budget, and concise CV’s for all academic collaborators.

Proposal Timeline:

  • Proposal Announcement – April 17, 2018
  • Proposal Deadline – 5:00 p.m. on Friday, June 1, 2018 submitted to ugpn@surrey.ac.uk
  • Announcement of Awards – July 2018

2017 Funded Proposals

We are pleased to announce the awardees for the 2017 UGPN Research Collaboration Fund. A total of 39 proposals were submitted for competitive review, including 19 projects involving NC State faculty. Ten proposals representing researchers from the four partner institutions were selected for funding, with 5 proposals including at least one NC State PI:
 
  • Dr. Gavin Williams, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry
    “Accelerating the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics via microbial engineering”
  • Dr. Tiegang Fang, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
    “Supercritical spray for dual fuel combustion”
  • Dr. Cathrine Hoyo, Professor, Biological Sciences & Director, Epidemiology and Environmental Epigenomics Laboratory
    “Resilience and diversity in early childhood development”
  • Dr. Xiangwu Zhang, Professor, College of Textiles
    “Flexible Functional Nano-Carbon Electrodes for Energy Devices”
  • Dr. Mary Ann Lila, David H. Murdock Distinguished Professor, Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences and Director, Plants for Human Health Institute
    Dr. Debora Esposito, Assistant Professor, Regenerative Medicine, Department of Animal Science
    “Association of total mineral content and elemental speciation with the healing properties of berries”

https://global.ncsu.edu/ugpn/
Posted: 04/19/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Teaching, research, or a project combining both activities. The German Fulbright Commission is particularly interested in teaching and/or research proposals based on comparative approaches and issues, especially but not exclusively in the humanities and social sciences. Whether lecturing, consulting on course design/curriculum and/or researching, the specifics of the arrangement should be worked out directly with the prospective host institution. Scholars with short term projects of less than one term (i.e., 2 months) which include a teaching segment should propose to teach one or two block seminars over four to six weeks and include syllabi tailored to the needs of the host institution. Fulbright Scholars pursuing a teaching and/or research project in Germany may participate in the Fulbright Intercountry Lecturing Program which provides U.S. Fulbright scholars with opportunities to enrich their professional and cultural experience outside their country of assignment.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Two to four months
GRANT DATES

Grants are tenable between September 2019 and July 2020, with a start date no later than April 2020. No summer research or study is possible. For maximum outreach and impact, the project activities should take place when German universities are in session, i.e. during the core lecture periods which last from early October until the end of January (fall term) and from early April until the end of June (summer term).

LOCATIONS

Applicants are encouraged to arrange affiliation with accredited state-recognized German higher education institutions (cf. Higher Education Compass: https://www.hochschulkompass.de/en/higher-education-institutions.html), or university-affiliated research institutions.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIALIZATIONS

Applications are welcome in all disciplines, particularly the social sciences and humanities, with slight preference for Communications, Journalism, and Political Science.

Applications related to Conflict Management, Entrepreneurship, and International Relations are encouraged.

 

STIPEND

€3,600 per month for applicants holding their Ph.D. or equivalent degree for five or more years by the application deadline; €3,000 per month for applicants holding their Ph.D. or equivalent degree for less than five years by the application deadline.

 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

International round-trip travel (economy class up to a maximum of $1,400) and one-time baggage allowance of €150 for grantee only.

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

A monthly allowance in the amount of €276 for accompanying spouses will be provided for Scholars whose spouses accompany them for at least two consecutive months of the grant period.

 
SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

Participation in Fulbright mid-year meeting in Berlin if within grant period. Participation in private German health insurance program, which includes accompanying spouse and minors if they do not have their own income.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

 


https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-158
Posted: 04/19/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Teaching, research, or a project combining both activities. The German Fulbright Commission is particularly interested in teaching and/or research proposals based on comparative approaches and issues, especially but not exclusively in the humanities and social sciences. Whether lecturing, consulting on course design/curriculum and/or researching, the specifics of the arrangement should be worked out directly with the prospective host institution.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Two to four months
GRANT DATES

Grants are tenable between September 2019 and July 2021, with a start date no later than April 2020. No summer research or study is possible. For maximum outreach and impact, the project activities should take place when German universities are in session, i.e. during the core lecture periods which last from early October until the end of January (fall term) and from early April until the end of June (summer term).

LOCATIONS

Applicants are encouraged to arrange affiliation with accredited state-recognized German higher education institutions (cf. Higher Education Compass: https://www.hochschulkompass.de/en/higher-education-institutions.html), or university-affiliated research institutions.

FLEX OPTION
Yes
FLEX DESCRIPTION

The Flex Award is designed for scholars who require multiple visits to the host country. This option allows grants to be conducted over short segments, preferably during the German fall and/or summer terms. Interested applicants should clearly indicate plans for Flex in their project statement, including a project timeline. Flex awards are offered for teaching, teaching/research, and research. Flex grant parameters: the total grant length (over two segments) should be from two months to four months. The minimum length for any one grant segment is one month and the maximum is three months. Two grant segments may be spread over one or two consecutive years.

Scholars planning segments that last less than one term (i.e., one or two months) but include teaching activities should propose to teach compact block seminars and include syllabi tailored to the needs of the host institution. Scholars may be asked to give public talks, mentor students and otherwise engage with the host-country academic community.

DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIALIZATIONS

Applications are welcome in all disciplines, particularly the social sciences and humanities, with slight preference for Communications, Journalism, and Political Science.

Applications related to Conflict Management, Entrepreneurship, and International Relations are encouraged.

 

STIPEND

€3,600 per month for applicants holding their Ph.D. or equivalent degree for five or more years by the application deadline; €3,000 per month for applicants holding their Ph.D. or equivalent degree for less than five years by the application deadline.

 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

One-time international round-trip travel (economy class up to a maximum of $1400) and one-time baggage allowance of €150 for grantee only.

SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

Participation in Fulbright mid-year meeting in Berlin if within grant period. Participation in private German health insurance program.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

Applicatio


https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-flex-2
Posted: 04/19/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Teach for approximately 12 hours weekly, conduct research or teach for approximately six hours weekly and conduct research. Consult on curriculum, program and faculty development. Conduct seminars and workshops.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Three to nine months
GRANT DATES

Grants may not begin before late August or early September 2019 (depending on the host institution academic calendar) and must be completed no later than June 2020.

LOCATIONS

Applicant may indicate a preferred host institution and refer in the project statement to the reasons for this preference, citing previous communication with, or knowledge of, the desired host institution in Egypt. Affiliation will be confirmed by the Binational Fulbright Commission in Egypt.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

During their grant period, Fulbright U.S. Scholars in the Middle East and North Africa region may apply for a short-term regional travel grant (five to 14 days) for participation in a variety of activities including faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, conferences, or some combination thereof. Scholars who apply for the Flex award are ineligible for the Regional Travel Program.

 

STIPEND

Monthly base stipend of $3,500 for faculty at the associate professor, professor rank or the professional equivalent, and $3,350 for faculty at or below the assistant professor rank and professional equivalents. Monthly maintenance allowance of $500 USD payable in Egyptian Pounds (EGP). The monthly maintenance allowance increases by $100 USD (payable in EGP) per dependent, for a maximum of two accompanying dependents who spend at least 80 percent of the grant period with the grantee in Egypt. Monthly housing allowance of up to $1,800 USD, inclusive of utilities and other associated costs, is payable in EGP. 

 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

International travel and relocation allowance for grantee is provided; plus, international travel allowance is provided for up to one accompanying dependent.

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

A maximum of $8,500 per child or $17,000 per family, or its equivalent in Egyptian pounds (EGP), for qualifying dependent children in grades K-12 is reimbursed, against receipts, for a full academic year. Amount is prorated for shorter grant periods.

 
SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

A one-time professional allowance of $1,400 USD is provided for grants of four months or more and payable in EGP. For grants of fewer than four months, scholars receive a one-time professional allowance of $820 USD, payable in EGP. The exchange rate for allowances payable in EGP is determined at the time that the grant document is issued. Limited funds are available for scholars whose research will require supplemental Arabic language study while in country. Justification statement and plan of study must be submitted, pending availability of funds and approval of proposal. Reimbursement will be in EGP against original receipts.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-182
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Three options are available: full-time research; full-time teaching; or a combination of teaching and research, often split semester by semester.

For teachers, or for a combination of teaching and research, applicants should suggest courses for consideration (syllabi)  in their proposals and be in touch with the university where they intend to teach. The Moroccan university class is generally two hours long and meets once a week. Applicants should expect to teach two to eight class hours per week. Activities and courses will be finalized in consultation with the Fulbright Commission in Rabat and the host institution.

For researchers, to the degree possible, research locations and institutions should be identified in the application. Community engagement is welcome and researchers are encouraged to give public lectures on their research and their specialties in general.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Three to 10 months
GRANT DATES

Grants may begin any time starting September 2019. Grantees are encouraged to arrive in early September to participate in the in-country orientation and prepare for the academic year.

LOCATIONS

Any appropriate Moroccan institution. Applicants are strongly encouraged to arrange an affiliation prior to submitting their application. Please contact Director James Miller at jamesmillerfulbright@gmail.com or Program Officer Sarah Robyn robynfulblright@gmail.com at the Fulbright Commission in Rabat for assistance in establishing communication with possible host institutions.  

FLEX OPTION
Yes
FLEX DESCRIPTION

The Flex Award is designed for scholars who require multiple visits to the host country. This option allows grants to be conducted over short segments, preferably during the fall and/or spring semesters. Interested applicants should clearly indicate plans for Flex in their project statement, including a project timeline. Flex grantees may be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host-country academic community.

Flex grant parameters:

  • Minimum length of the total grant is four months and the maximum is six months;
  • Minimum length for any grant segment is one month and the maximum is three months;
  • Two or three grant segments may be spread over one or two consecutive years; and
  • Flex awards are offered for teaching, teaching/research, and research grants.

Applicants must make a strong case for why the Flex option is required for their project. Generally, Flex grants should be used to for research projects that observe behavior or participation rates over time or are seasonal in nature (festivals, religious activities). Flex grants may also be used to complete teaching or combined teaching/research activities that require follow-up visits. Flex applicants should submit possible courses for consideration and/or cite all research locations in their applications.

DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
DISCIPLINES
TEFL
SPECIALIZATIONS

Specializations of particular interest for teaching include:

  • Marine sciences (taught in French and English)
  • Petroleum engineering and related sciences (taught in English)
  • American studies; linguistics (taught in English)
  • Agricultural sciences (taught in French at most institutions)
  • Arts (not typically language-based)
  • All social sciences (taught in either Arabic or French)
  • Religious Studies (Arabic or English)
  • TEFL    

Applicants should note that English is increasingly accepted as a language of instruction.

Typical research fields are in subjects related to Moroccan and Arab-Amazigh and Islamic culture and society. Historically, one-third of all American research grants have been in anthropology and the Commission encourages American social science research in Morocco.

SPECIAL FEATURES

During their grant period, Fulbright U.S. Scholars in the Middle East and North Africa region may apply for a short-term regional travel grant (five to 14 days) for participation in a variety of activities including faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, conferences, or some combination thereof. Scholars who apply for the Flex award are ineligible for the Regional Travel Program.

 

STIPEND

A base stipend of $1,800 per month for researchers and lecturers. A monthly living allowance of $700-$1,320 and a monthly housing allowance of $600-$800, based on the number of accompanying dependents and location. Note that grantee dependents must remain in Morocco for a minimum of six months of the grant period in order to qualify for an increased allowance. Amounts are paid 70 percent in dirhams and 30 percent in U.S. dollars.

 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

Grantees receive international round-trip travel plus round-trip airfare for one accompanying dependent who remains with the grantee for a minimum of six months of the grant period. All grantees, independent of the length of their grant, receive a relocation allowance of $750. An excess-baggage allowance of $600 will be provided to all grantees.

ESTIMATED BOOK AND RESEARCH ALLOWANCE

A one-time book/research materials allowance of $500 will be provided for grantees staying five months or more. For those staying fewer than five months, the book/research allowance is $250.

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

No tuition allowance will be provided. English-language schooling is available. An alliance of American schools in Rabat, Casablanca, Marrakech and Tangier follow a regular U.S. curriculum. For Department of State information on K-12 schools in general, visit the Office of Overseas Schools website. Information is also available about RabatCasablancaMarrakech, and Tangier.

 
SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

Housing is not provided and is the grantee's responsibility.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

Application R


https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-180
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $70,000.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

The United States-Israel Educational Foundation (USIEF) plans to award eight grants to U.S. postdoctoral scholars who seek to pursue research at Israeli institutions of higher education. Grants are open to researchers in all academic disciplines and support programs of work in Israel for up to 20 months (two academic years).

According to USIEF policy, Fulbright postdoctoral fellows must hold official postdoctoral fellow status at their host institutions in Israel, including access to campus resources. Additionally, host institutions will be asked to provide Fulbright postdoctoral fellows a grant no smaller than their own standard institutional postdoctoral award, a description of which should be included in the letter of invitation submitted with the Fulbright application. For more information on the financial contribution required by host institutions, please contact Noa Turgeman at NoaT@fulbright.org.il.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities.
GRANT LENGTH
Up to 20 months
GRANT DATES

Grants may begin any time in the period of August 2019-April 2020 as agreed upon with host institution.

LOCATIONS

Any accredited institution of higher education. For the complete list of these institutions, click here.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

During their grant period, Fulbright U.S. Scholars in the Middle East and North Africa region may apply for a short-term regional travel grant (five to 14 days) for participation in a variety of activities including faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, conferences, or some combination thereof.

 

STIPEND

USIEF stipend of up to $70,000 ($35,000 per academic year for two years). In addition, each grantee should receive from his/her host institution a grant no smaller than its own standard postdoctoral award.


https://awards.cies.org/content/postdoctoral-fellowship-0
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

The United States–Israel Educational Foundation (USIEF) plans to award up to eight fellowships to senior faculty members, senior professionals, or to accomplished artists or writers for visits to Israeli institutions of higher education to be carried out during the 2019-20 academic year. The program is open to all fields of study. Scholars’ proposed activities may include research, lecturing, or a combination of lecturing and research.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities.
GRANT LENGTH
Four months
GRANT DATES

Grants can begin in the period October 15, 2019-March 1, 2020 as agreed upon with host institution.

LOCATIONS

Any accredited institution of higher education. For the complete list of such institutions, click here.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

During their grant period, Fulbright U.S. Scholars in the Middle East and North Africa region may apply for a short-term regional travel grant (five to 14 days) for participation in a variety of activities including faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, conferences, or some combination thereof.

 

STIPEND

Monthly stipend, payable in U.S. dollars: $4,500/month for unaccompanied grantees $5,000/month for grantees accompanied by one dependent; $5,500/month for grantees accompanied by two dependents; $6,000/month for grantees accompanied by three or more dependents (qualifying dependents for the determination of stipend level and for the award of visas: spouse, or child who is financially dependent on the grantee).


https://awards.cies.org/content/senior-scholar-all-disciplines-fellowship-0
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Conduct research in two or more countries within the region. Scholars must be approved for research in at least two countries in order to receive the award.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Three to nine months; Flex grants comprised of two- to three-month long segments conducted over two consecutive years are also possible (see "Flex Option" for details).
GRANT DATES

Grants may begin anytime after August 1, 2018.

LOCATIONS

Any appropriate institutions in two or more of the following locations in the Middle East and North Africa: Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and West Bank.

FLEX OPTION
Yes
FLEX DESCRIPTION

The Flex Award is designed for scholars who require multiple visits to the host country. This option allows grants to be conducted over short segments, preferably during the fall and/or spring semesters. Interested applicants should clearly indicate plans for Flex in their project statement, including a project timeline. Flex grantees may be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host-country academic community.

Flex grant parameters:

  • Minimum length of the total grant is four months and the maximum is six months;
  • Minimum length for any grant segment is one month and the maximum is three months;
  • Applicants may propose only one, one-month segment; and,
  • Grant segments may be spread over two consecutive years.

For more information, please visit the Fulbright Flex Awards page on our website.

DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
 
STIPEND

Monthly benefits will follow the rates for Researchers for Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar grants in each proposed country.

RESEARCHER MONTHLY STIPEND
$4,400-$8,350
 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

Round-trip, economy-class, international travel arranged by travel agent selected by CIES, for scholar and up to two accompanying dependents. An allowance will be provided to cover the costs associated with relocation and excess baggage. For Flex grants: round trip travel will be included for each segment of the grant for the grantee only. Dependent travel will not be provided.

ESTIMATED BOOK AND RESEARCH ALLOWANCE

$2,000 research allowance.

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

Up to $8,500 per child or $17,000 per family for accompanying dependents in grades K-12 is reimbursed for scholars on a 10-month grant, upon submission of receipts, and based on the availability of funds. Amount may be adjusted for shorter grant periods. Reimbursement is based on actual cost of tuition and fees only. For Flex grants: dependent tuition allowance will not be provided.

 
Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

https://awards.cies.org/content/middle-east-and-north-africa-regional-research-program-0
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Teach undergraduate or graduate courses, consult on curriculum and program development; advise graduate students on theses, conduct seminars, workshops and public lectures.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Five months for a one-semester grant; 10 months for a two-semester grant
GRANT DATES

One-semester grants may begin in September 2019 or January 2020; two-semester grants must begin in September 2019.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

Fulbright East Asia Pacific Regional Travel Program

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region have the opportunity to apply for funds to support short-term (3-14 days) travel to other countries in the EAP region for activities such as lectures, workshops, graduate or faculty seminars, master classes or recitals, curricular advising or panel presentations. Funding covers transportation only. It is not necessary to suggest regional activities nor identify a host as part of the initial Fulbright application, though scholars may pursue invitations for short-term activities in other EAP countries once notified that they have been selected for a Fulbright grant. Scholars may only apply for travel program funds when in country during their Fulbright grant period.

 

TEACHING OR TEACHING/RESEARCH AWARD (ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OR BELOW) MONTHLY STIPEND
$5,490-$5,790
TEACHING OR TEACHING/RESEARCH AWARD (ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSOR) MONTHLY STIPEND
$5,710-$6,010
 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

$4,000-$9,500 

ESTIMATED BOOK AND RESEARCH ALLOWANCE

$1,000 book and educational materials allowance (per semester) to be donated to the host institution (or other entity) upon grantee's departure

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

Up to $5,000 per child (up to two) in grades 1-12 is reimbursed per semester, upon submission of receipts. Maximum of $20,000 per family for a 10-month grant.

 
SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

Housing will be provided by host university for teaching awards.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.
 

https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-135
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Scholars should expect to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in their area of expertise for approximately six hours per week. The average class size is about 35 students. Teaching assistants are available if classes are large. Scholars will also be expected to advise students and consult on general education curriculum development, teaching, and learning enhancement. The remaining grant allocation should be devoted to research activities.

Scholars will also be expected to deliver at least one lecture as part of the University of Macau Fulbright Lecture Series.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Five months for a one-semester grant; 10 months for a two-semester grant
GRANT DATES

One-semester grants may begin in September 2019 or January 2020; two-semester grants must begin in September 2019.

LOCATIONS

In 2014, in order to meet Macau’s needs for high-quality professionals, University of Macau (UM) relocated to a new campus on Hengqin Island, Guangdong province. The campus is under the jurisdiction of the Macao SAR. It covers approximately 1.09 square kilometers, is 20 times larger than the old campus, and can accommodate at least 15,000 students. On the new campus, UM implements a residential college (RC) system modelled upon the successful experience of top universities like Oxford, Cambridge, and Yale. Currently there are 10 RCs on campus. The goal of this model is that through frequent peer interaction, students will improve their interpersonal skills, acquire self-discipline, learn self-management, and achieve well-rounded development. 

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines, but applications in the following disciplines are preferred:
DISCIPLINES
Medical Sciences
Physics and Astronomy
Public/Global Health
SPECIALIZATIONS

Applications in the following specializations are preferred: health sciences, applied physics and traditional Chinese medicines.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Fulbright East Asia Pacific Regional Travel Program

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region have the opportunity to apply for funds to support short-term (3-14 days) travel to other countries in the EAP region for activities such as lectures, workshops, graduate or faculty seminars, master classes or recitals, curricular advising or panel presentations. Funding covers transportation only. It is not necessary to suggest regional activities nor identify a host as part of the initial Fulbright application, though scholars may pursue invitations for short-term activities in other EAP countries once notified that they have been selected for a Fulbright grant. Scholars may only apply for travel program funds when in country during their Fulbright grant period.

 

TEACHING OR TEACHING/RESEARCH AWARD (ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OR BELOW) MONTHLY STIPEND
$5,490-$5,590
TEACHING OR TEACHING/RESEARCH AWARD (ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSOR) MONTHLY STIPEND
$5,710-$5,810
 
ESTIMATED TRAVEL AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE

$4,000-$9,500

ESTIMATED BOOK AND RESEARCH ALLOWANCE

$1,000 books and educational materials allowance (per semester) to be donated to the host institution (or other entity) upon grantee's departure

 
DEPENDENT TUITION ALLOWANCE

There are no allowances for dependent children. English-language schools (grades 1-12) are available for dependents' education at applicant's own arrangement and costs.

 
SPECIAL AWARD BENEFITS

Housing will be provided by host university.

Please refer to the figures above for an estimate of Fulbright award benefits. Benefits may include a monthly base stipend, living and housing allowances, and additional one-time allowances. Benefits may vary based on a scholar's current academic rank (or professional equivalent), the city of placement, the type of award (teaching, teaching/research, or research), and the number of and duration of stay of accompanying dependents. In most cases, dependent housing and living allowances will not be provided to Flex grantees. Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the 2019-2020 academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State reserves the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

https://awards.cies.org/content/all-disciplines-137
Posted: 04/18/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

For research or teaching, or a combination of teaching and research activities. Teaching can include co-teaching, guest lectures, workshops, seminars. Depending on the department, it is likely that the grantee will also work with faculty, developing curriculum and conducting workshops and seminars. Applicant may determine percentage of the grant dedicated to each activity and should define this clearly in the project abstract/summary and the project statement. Opportunities for guest lectures at other universities may also be available.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Four to nine months; Flex grants: 4-6 months
GRANT DATES

Grants may begin any time after July 1, 2019. Grants must begin by March 31, 2020. Flex: grant activity must be completed by August 31, 2021.

LOCATIONS

Affiliations are available throughout India except for the State of Jammu and Kashmir (except Ladakh).  In addition to universities and colleges, affiliations with think tanks, nongovernmental organizations and research centers in the respective areas of specialization will be considered.

Applicant is encouraged to indicate affiliation preference and secure an invitation letter from an institution when possible.  Affiliation will be finalized by the United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF) after grantee is selected.  USIEF reserves the right to change the affiliation if the one indicated in the application is unsuitable for any reason. 

FLEX OPTION
Yes
FLEX DESCRIPTION

The Flex Award is designed for scholars who require multiple visits to the host country. This option allows grants to be conducted over short segments. Interested applicants should clearly indicate plans for Flex in their project statement, including a project timeline.

Flex grant parameters:

• Minimum length of the total grant is four months and the maximum is six months;

• Minimum length for any grant segment is one month and the maximum is five months;

• Two grant segments may be spread over one or two consecutive years;

• Only offered for research grants; and

• Applicants should indicate in their project proposals how they intend to engage with the host institution and academic community beyond their research project.

DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

South and Central Asia Fulbright Regional Travel Grant

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the South and Central Asia (SCA) region may apply for a regional travel grant to engage in a variety of activities at academic institutions and non-profit organizations in eligible SCA countries (India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Nepal, Republic of the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan).  Activities that U.S Scholars may engage in include: faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, conferences, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, or some combination thereof. Scholars in the arts may be invited to give master classes or recitals, participate in exhibitions or workshops, or consult with cultural institutions. Activities may not include research. This grant will cover travel to and from the destination and lodging may be offered by the hosting institution. Scholars may only apply for this grant once in country on their Fulbright grant. As funds are limited, scholars are limited to one such travel grant.

South and Central Asia Fulbright Midyear Conference

With funding provided by the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the U.S.-India Educational Foundation (the Fulbright Commission in India) invites eligible Fulbright Scholars in the South and Central Asia region to attend the annual South and Central Asia Fulbright Midyear Conference in India in 2019 (usually held in February or March). The conference is an opportunity for current Fulbright U.S. Scholars who are on their Fulbright grants in the SCA region at the time of the conference to gather to discuss each other’s work and educational exchange issues and to invite suggestions for the future development and enhancement of the Fulbright Program. Financial assistance to attend the conference is provided as an additional Fulbright grant benefit.


https://awards.cies.org/content/fulbright-nehru-academic-and-professional-excellence-awards-all-disciplines-0
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Work with faculty members at host institution on program development and curriculum design. Travel to higher education institutions around India to deliver guest lectures and take part in symposia and conferences. Proposals should demonstrate an interest in active collaboration with Indian scholars and the host community.

Teaching: teach/advise students at host institution.

Teaching/research: teach/advise students at host institution and conduct research in area of specialization. Applicant may determine percentage of the grant dedicated to each activity and should define this clearly in the project abstract/summary and the project statement.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Four months
GRANT DATES

Grants may begin any time after July 1, 2019. Grants must begin by March 31, 2020.

LOCATIONS

Affiliations are available throughout India except for the State of Jammu and Kashmir (except Ladakh).  In addition to universities and colleges, affiliations with think tanks, nongovernmental organizations and research centers in the respective areas of specialization will be considered.

Applicant is encouraged to indicate affiliation preference and secure an invitation letter from an institution when possible.  Affiliation will be finalized by the United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF) after grantee is selected.  USIEF reserves the right to change the affiliation if the one indicated in the application is inappropriate for any reason. 

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

South and Central Asia Fulbright Regional Travel Grant

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the South and Central Asia (SCA) region may apply for a regional travel grant to engage in a variety of activities at academic institutions or non-profit organizations in eligible SCA countries (India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Nepal, Republic of the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan).  Activities that U.S Scholars may engage in include: faculty and student lectures, graduate or faculty seminars, conferences, curriculum development, public lectures, panel presentations, needs assessment, or some combination thereof. Scholars in the arts may be invited to give master classes or recitals, participate in exhibitions or workshops, or consult with cultural institutions. Activities may not include research. This grant will cover travel to and from the destination and lodging may be offered by the hosting institution. Scholars may only apply for this grant once in country on their Fulbright grant. As funds are limited, scholars are limited to one such travel grant.

South and Central Asia Fulbright Midyear Conference

With funding provided by the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the U.S.-India Educational Foundation (the Fulbright Commission in India) invites eligible Fulbright Scholars in the South and Central Asia region to attend the annual South and Central Asia Fulbright Midyear Conference in India in 2019 (usually held in February or March). The conference is an opportunity for current Fulbright U.S. Scholars who are on their Fulbright grants in the SCA region at the time of the conference to gather to discuss each other’s work and educational exchange issues and to invite suggestions for the future development and enhancement of the Fulbright Program. Financial assistance to attend the conference is provided as an additional Fulbright grant benefit.

In- Country Grant Related Travel

The Fulbright Commission in India provides up to $2000 for travel and accommodation expenses for delivering lectures/ talks or conducting workshops across India. These events can be organized by the Commission upon recommendation from the scholar or receiving invitation from other institutions for hosting the scholar.


https://awards.cies.org/content/fulbright-nehru-distinguished-chair-all-disciplines-0
Posted: 04/17/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Conduct collaborative research in the area of specialization on an issue of priority to ASEAN or to the U.S.-ASEAN relationship in two or three ASEAN countries: Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam. Project statement must include a detailed description of proposed research, including justification for each country to be visited, duration and dates in each country, host institutions and planned site(s) to be visited.

Applicants are encouraged to contact the East Asia and the Pacific Team to discuss their proposed research before applying.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary research or teaching activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Three to six months. Award activity must be undertaken in a single period of residence abroad. Applicants may propose travel to each country no more than once.
GRANT DATES

Research grants may begin any time after June 2019 and must be completed by September 30, 2020.

LOCATIONS

Affiliations with universities, think tanks, nongovernmental organizations and research centers in the selected host countries may be considered.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines, but applications in the following disciplines are preferred:
DISCIPLINES
Area Studies
Economics
Environmental Sciences
Law
Political Science
Public Administration
Public/Global Health
SPECIALIZATIONS

Applications in the following specializations are particularly sought: climate change, comparative politics, dispute settlement and negotiation, diplomacy, economic integration and trade policy, environmental science/studies, gender studies, human migration and trafficking, international law, international relations, marine conservation, public health, public policy, regional security, wildlife trafficking and global youth studies.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Fulbright East Asia Pacific Regional Travel Program

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region have the opportunity to apply for funds to support short-term (3-14 days) travel to other countries in the EAP region for activities such as lectures, workshops, graduate or faculty seminars, master classes or recitals, curricular advising or panel presentations. Funding covers transportation only. It is not necessary to suggest regional activities nor identify a host as part of the initial Fulbright application, though scholars may pursue invitations for short-term activities in other EAP countries once notified that they have been selected for a Fulbright grant. Scholars may only apply for Fulbright EAP Regional Travel Program funds when in country during their Fulbright grant period.

 

 


https://awards.cies.org/content/asean-research-program-0
Posted: 04/04/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


Overview: 

Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar Awards are open to U.S. scholars who have recently completed their doctoral degree – typically within the five previous years. Scholars are eligible to apply if they will complete the requirements for their doctoral (or equivalent) degree by February 1, 2018, unless otherwise specified in the award description. Postdoctoral awards are available in STEM fields, the arts, humanities and social sciences. These grants present an excellent opportunity for recently minted scholars to deepen their expertise, to acquire new skills, to work with additional resources and to make connections with others in their fields.

Grantees will be expected to engage with graduate students in the host country and to continue their specialized training in cutting edge research. In addition to their primary research or teaching activities, grantees may be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host country academic community.

If you are applying without having completed your doctoral (or equivalent) degree requirements, one of your letters must come from your committee chair, addressing your degree progress and expected end date, which must be on or before February 1, 2018 unless otherwise noted in the award description. Additional documentation may later be requested.

?

 


https://www.cies.org/program/postdoc
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


Overview: 

The Fulbright Global Scholar Award allows U.S. academics and professionals to engage in multi-country, trans-regional projects. As a truly worldwide award, U.S. scholars will be able to propose research or combined teaching/research activity in two to three countries with flexible schedule options; trips can be conducted within one academic year or spread over two consecutive years. For more information and examples on the grant schedule, please see below.

Grant Schedule: 

?Applications are welcome from a wide range of scholars - early career, professor emeriti, independent scholars - and from all disciplines, including those with an interdisciplinary focus.

The Fulbright Scholar Program is designed to expand and strengthen the relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of the rest of the world. To support this mission, grantees will be asked to give public talks, mentor students and otherwise engage with the host country community, in addition to their primary research or teaching/research activity.

Award Description:
The Fulbright U.S. Scholar awards for academic year 2019-2020 are now open. View the Global Scholar Award description online in the Catalog of Awards for complete grant parameters. Please register your interest at My Fulbright to receive the latest program updates and announcements.

Grant/Program Dates or Duration:

Three to six months total with a minimum of one month spent in each host country, each visit. 


https://www.cies.org/program/fulbright-global-scholar-award
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


Award Details: 

Grant Activity:

The aim of the grant is to allow professionals in various fields to take a sabbatical leave of four to five months from normal work duties to pursue further education or training that would enhance their professional development and the field at large. The applicants should be at a point in their careers when maximum benefit will ensue from this period of professional enrichment. The focus of the grant cannot be aimed at academic research or lecturing projects.

The applicant should create a project that may include studies, practical experience in actual operations, visits to organizations in the applicant's professional field, public lectures or other appropriate professional experiences. The applicant's project plan should include a concrete description of the planned activities during the grant period as well as the expected benefits for completing the project for the applicant and his/her professional field.

Please note that the MCPD awards, which are unique to Finland, use the Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar application form. However, the MCPD award is not meant for academic research.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary research or teaching activities‎. 

 

Grant Length: 

Four to five months

 

Grant Dates: 

Grants must begin in August/September 2019 or January 2020.

 

Locations: 

Applicants must arrange affiliation and include a letter of invitation from the host institution in Finland. Possible affiliations include government organizations, universities, museums, art institutions, nonprofits and private businesses, among others.

 

Flex Option: 

No

 

Discipline Type:

Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines

 

Specializations: 

The grant is meant for professionals in all fields. However, proposals for medical research involving clinical training, patient care or patient contact are not eligible. Please note that the MCPD grant cannot be used for academic research. 

 

Special Features: 

The candidate is responsible for arranging the housing required for his/her stay. 

The Fulbright Finland in Helsinki arranges a three-and-a-half-day orientation for scholars at the end of August, which scholars arriving for the fall semester are expected to attend. An orientation meeting may also be arranged for scholars arriving in January.

Application


https://awards.cies.org/content/mid-career-professional-development-0
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Through this award sponsored by Fulbright Commissions in Madrid and Rabat, scholars may teach, conduct research or pursue a combination of teaching/research activities at Spanish and Moroccan academic and research institutions. Projects that are comparative in nature and address issues linking Spain & Morocco are encouraged. Activities may include presenting lectures, seminars and workshops as arranged by host institutions or the Fulbright Commissions. No less than 40% of the grant period may be spent in either country.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary research or teaching activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Seven to 10 months
GRANT DATES

September 2019 to June 2020.

LOCATIONS

Spanish and Moroccan universities, institutions of higher education, cultural, or research centers.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines

https://awards.cies.org/content/morocco-spain-joint-teachingresearch-award
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

Conduct postdoctoral activities in support of the candidate's professional development while advancing the scholarly mission of the host institution. Additionally, the scholar may give periodic seminars in the area of research, and mentor graduate and undergraduate students.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary research or teaching activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Four to nine months
GRANT DATES

Grants must be completed before September 30, 2020.

LOCATIONS

Projects are encouraged in all parts of Brazil, not only in large cities. Priority will be given to applicants who locate their projects outside of the urban areas of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Only applications in the following disciplines will be considered
DISCIPLINES
Agriculture
Biological Sciences
Chemistry
Computer Science
Engineering
Environmental Sciences
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Medical Sciences
Physics and Astronomy
 

https://awards.cies.org/content/postdoctoral-scholar-award-natural-sciences
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/01/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): Fulbright Scholar Program


GRANT ACTIVITY

This special award is available to two U.S. citizens and aims to advance scholarship in the priority fields of strategic studies, technology and innovation. The awards will promote the exchange of ideas, research collaboration, and cultural understanding between American and Australian Scholars as well as the institutions that host them. 

See Project Statement requirement in Additional Comments.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary research or teaching activities‎.
GRANT LENGTH
Three to four months
GRANT DATES

Grants must be started in January/February 2020 in line with the academic year and for attendance at the Orientation Program and Gala Presentation Dinner.

LOCATIONS

Any suitable/relevant institution/organisation

FLEX OPTION
No
DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines
SPECIAL FEATURES

East Asia and Pacific Fulbright Regional Travel Grant

During their grant period, Fulbright Scholars in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region have the opportunity to apply for funds to support short-term (3-14 days) travel to other countries in the EAP region for activities such as lectures, workshops, graduate or faculty seminars, master classes or recitals, curricular advising or panel presentations. Funding covers transportation only. It is not necessary to suggest regional activities nor identify a host as part of the initial Fulbright application, though scholars may pursue invitations for short-term activities in other EAP countries once notified that they have been selected for a Fulbright grant. Scholars may only apply for Fulbright EAP Regional Travel Program funds after beginning their Fulbright grant in Australia.


https://awards.cies.org/content/fulbright-professional-scholarships-australia-united-states-alliance-studies
Posted: 03/08/2018

Deadline: 08/28/2018
Estimated Program Funding: $0.00
Funding Agency(s): National Science Foundation (NSF)


The National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate of Biological Sciences and the National Research Foundation (NRF) have formed a partnership to promote opportunities for collaboration between researchers of the United States and South Africa. This collaboration offers the United States and South African researchers an opportunity to apply for funding for Joint Research for International Research Coordination Networks (IRCNs) in Biodiversity. 

The IRCN mechanism provides an opportunity for South African and U.S. research communities to communicate and coordinate their research activities on a wide range of environmental biology topics, including: ecosystem forecasting and monitoring, community origin, maintenance and function, species diversity and evolutionary relationships, emerging diseases and pests, and biodiversity theory. Projects are expected to enhance current collaborations and establish new collaborations between the U.S. and South African biodiversity research communities to help prioritise research topics, enhance complementary research activities, and identify new synergistic research directions. The overall aim of the IRCN mechanism is to facilitate networking and knowledge sharing. Therefore, direct research-related activities will not be funded through this Programme. Proposals outside the above-mentioned broad thematic area of focus will not be accepted. NRF is pleased to announce 1st joint call in International Research Coordination Networks (IRCNs) for 2018, and herewith invite all interested parties to submit their applications.

All South African applications must be submitted through an online application process to the NRF at https://nrfsubmission.nrf.ac.za. A detailed call document is attached.

Key dates:

Call opens: 17 November 2017

Call closes: 28 February 2018

Please note that applications submitted outside the NRF Submission system will not be accepted.

NRF Contacts:
Ms Nombuso Madonda
Knowledge Advancement and Support (KAS)
Tel: +27 12 481 4285        
Email: nombuso.madonda@nrf.ac.za

Jan Phalane
Grants Management and Systems Administration
Tel: +27 12 481 4157
Email: Jan.phalane@nrf.ac.za


http://www.nrf.ac.za/division/funding/nrfnsf-international-research-coordination-networks-ircns-joint-science-and
Posted: 12/01/2017