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Viewing 487 Projects

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Germplasm Collection
Weathington, Mark
Horticultural Science
J.C. Raulston Arboretum
Project Dates: 08/01/2007 - 12/30/2030

Collect germplasm for research from various countries including Mexico, New Zealand, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, and others in coorperation with local hosts.

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International Research Center for Animal Environment and Welfare (IRCAEW) Board of Directors Member Research project
Wang-Li, Lingjuan
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 10/24/2017 - 10/25/2028
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

I was selected to be a Board of Directors Member of International Research Center for Animal Environment and Welfare (IRCAEW) in October 2017. More information about this center may be found at  http://www.ircaew.org/ 

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Molecular Mechanisms and Dynamics of Plant-Microbe Interactions at the Root-Soil Interface: InRoot Research project
Sederoff, Heike
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 09/01/2019 - 08/31/2025
Country(s): Denmark

One of the grand challenges facing humanity is to secure sufficient and healthy food for the increasing world population. This requires maintaining sustainable cultivation of crop plants under changing climate conditions. Plant roots and soil microbes have been associated since the emergence of plants on land. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that coevolved to control and regulate microbiota associations with healthy plants are largely unexplored. The photosynthetically active green leaf tissues supply assimilated carbon to roots for development and also to feed its associated microbes. To maintain balanced growth, plants have to integrate this underground demand and regulate the rate of photosynthetic CO2 fixation, and sugar allocation needs to be coordinated between root and shoot. Research on plants and their naturally associated microorganisms is therefore in a prime position to provide new perspectives and concepts for understanding plant function, plant performance and plant growth under limited input conditions with a reduced environmental footprint and could also define breeding targets and develop microbial interventions. InRoot aims to: 1. Disentangle the effects of climate and soil type from the impact of root-microbe interactions through transplantation experiments and exploit natural variation to identify the plant genetic components responsible for adaptation to the local microbiota. 2. Identify key bacterial taxa governing the establishment of host-driven microbial networks in the rhizosphere by analysing the microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions established in tailored synthetic communities (SynComs) with direct consequences on host performance. 3. Define the plant genetic components that control infection of plant roots by ubiquitous and host-specific endophytes using advanced genetic screens and new methods for quantifying root cellular responses to microbes 4. Understand molecular mechanisms integrating root-microbe interactions into whole-plant physiology by investigating systemic physiological responses induced by SynComs using whole plant phenotyping. 5. Predict plant performance as a function of plant and microbiota genotypes by building multiscale models based on genotype, phenotype, and mechanistic data thereby providing knowledge for application. InRoot perspective: Provide knowledge and tools for science-based development of new crop varieties and associated microbial interventions that will improve productivity, reduce the need for fertilizers and pesticides, and alleviate negative environmental impact.

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Tolyporphin tetrapyrroles from cyanobacteria Research project
Miller, Eric (Eric) S.
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2016 - 01/01/2025
Country(s): Mexico | United States

Studie of tolyporphin biosynthesis from cyanobacteria and cyanobacterial-microbial consortia

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Effects of climate change factors on plant-microbial intereactions in Tibetan and Yellow Loess Plateau grasslands Research project
Hu, Shuijin
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 05/01/2015 - 10/31/2024
Country(s):

During my sabbatical leave at Nanjing Agricultural University in 2014-2015, I helped design two long-term (planned for 10 years if funding is available) global change factor manipulation experiments, one each on the Tibetan Plateau Alpine (Maqu, Gansu Province) (33°59’N, 102°00’E, c. 3538 m a.s.l.) ) and Yellow Loess Plateau (Guyuan, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region) (106°21′–106°27′E, 36°10′ – 36°17′N, altitude 1800–2000 m), northwest China.  The two experiments have an identical design and treatments in field but they are under very different environmental conditions (alpine meadow vs. semi-arid grassland). Each field manipulation experiment involves three levels of precipitation (precipitation reduction by 30% (PR), ambient, precipitation increase by 30% (PI)), two levels of warming (ambient, warming) and two levels of N (ambient, 12 g m -2 yr -1 added N). Randomized block design was used with 4 replicates. In total, we had 48 (3 precipitation levels × 2 warming levels × 2 N addition levels × 4 blocks) plots at each site. The plots were 4 m × 4 m in size and 1.5 m away from each other in each block. The distance between each block was 5 m. We used open top chamber (OTCs) with a maximum basal diameter of 150 cm, following the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) protocol (Papanikolaou et al. 2010; Waldrop & Firestone 2006), to increase air temperatures of the plots of the warming treatment. Nitrogen (206.9 g urea in total) was added as urea solution twice each year (half each in May and June). In each PR plot, we installed a rain shelter which was designed to prevent approximately 30% of precipitation in the plot. The rain shelter consisted of seven v-shaped transparent plexiglass and an iron hanger, which was 1 meter above the soil surface in the south side and 1.5 m on the north side. Intercepted rainfall in each PR plot was collected and then added into the nearest PI plot.

Each year, students, postdocs and young teachers from Nanjing Agric University stay on each site starting on early May to early October to maintain the field plots. It is really tough for them because of high elevation and poor field facilities (for example, no warm water on site but it is quite cold there).

Plant and soil samples have been collected or will be collected once or twice a year, pending on the manpower and funding availability.

I will mainly provide advice on sampling scheme, data analyses, and manuscript writing.

I strongly believe that it will be a significant contribution to the scientific community if we can maintain this long-term experiment. Because these sites locate in the region that is very sensitive to the ongoing climate change, we may obtain some unique results for the climate change community across the world. Some ecologists from US have visited these sites, including Dr. Scott Collins (Professor, U. of New Mexico, former president of Ecological Society of America), Dr. Valerie Eviner (Professor, UC Davis, former vice president of Ecological Society of America), Dr. Steven J. Hall at Iowa State and several professors from other universities in US. 

 

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Development of Efficient Agronomic Peanut Production Packages in Malawi Development project
Brandenburg, Rick L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2019 - 06/30/2023
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Malawi | Mozambique

Development of cost effective and profitable groundnut production systems in Malawi funded by USAID.  Collaborating with the Lilongwe University for Agriculture and Natural Resources and Horizon Farms Ltd, Limbe Leaf, and Alliance One International.  This reserch project conducts research on various inputs into peanut systems at both commercials scales and small-holder farmer production in villages.

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Development of an International Sensory Lexicon for Sweetpotato Development project
Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 01/01/2023
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Uganda

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Development of an International Sensory Lexicon for Sweetpotato Development project
Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 01/01/2023
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Uganda

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SweetGAINS: Sweetpotato Genetic Advances and Innovative Seed Systems Research project
Yencho, George (Craig) Craig
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 10/01/2019 - 09/30/2022
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Kenya | Peru | Uganda

SweetGAINS is an ambitious three-year project designed to modernize sweetpotato breeding in Africa. SweetGAINS will improve breeding operations and methodologies, ensure integration between breeding outputs and early generation seed availability, and strengthen a joint SpeedBreeders and Seed Community of Practice (CoP) by 2022.

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SweetGAINS: Sweetpotato Genetic Advances and Innovative Seed Systems Research project
Yencho, George (Craig) Craig
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 10/01/2019 - 09/30/2022
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Kenya | Peru | Uganda

SweetGAINS is an ambitious three-year project designed to modernize sweetpotato breeding in Africa. SweetGAINS will improve breeding operations and methodologies, ensure integration between breeding outputs and early generation seed availability, and strengthen a joint SpeedBreeders and Seed Community of Practice (CoP) by 2022.

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Effects of climate and urbanization on pine processionary moth range expansion Research project
Frank, Steven D
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 07/01/2017 - 05/31/2022
Country(s): France

The PPM is native to the Mediterranean Basin, and as winters have become warmer over the last several decades, it’s been expanding its range farther north due to climate change. We partnered with Alain Roques in the Forest Zoology lab at the French National Institute for Agronomic Research (INRA) in Orléans, France, to try to figure out whether the warmer temperatures in cities are giving urban-dwelling PPM caterpillars an advantage and promoting range expansion.

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CRISPR-Engineered phage for enhanced control of Listeria in food processing environments Development project
Kathariou, Sophia
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 05/31/2019 - 04/30/2022
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Development and validation of CRISPR-harbpring bacteriphage for enhanced biocontrol of  Listeria in food-processing facilties.

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Transcriptional and metabolic Alterations in Circadian Rhythm Networks with Increasing Nighttime Temperatures in Rice Research project
Doherty, Colleen Jennifer
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Bioinformatics
Project Dates: 02/08/2015 - 04/01/2022
Country(s): Philippines | United States

Analysing the molecular responses of rice plants to increased nighttime temperatures

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Borlaug Research Fellowship - Mexico, Maximum Residue Limits Development project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/21/2020 - 03/15/2022
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Identifying geminivirus resistant sequences in Manihot species of Mexican origin Research project
Ascencio-Ibanez, Jose (Trino) Trinidad
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 04/01/2017 - 12/31/2021
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Mexico

Research teams traveled to Mexico to identify and collect samples of Manihot species with geminivirus resistance. Twenty seven unique species were identified and samples collected from the field and from herbariums throughout Mexico. Working with multiple institutions and research herbariums the samples were collected and the DNA was isolated. The project hopes to use the DNA samples to sequence and work with Cassava free of the geminivirus. 

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NCSU Haiti Goat Project Development project
Farin, Charlotte E
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/31/2021
Country(s): Haiti

The NCSU Haiti Goat Project has two major components. The first is the development of a ‘Farm-to-Fork’ program that supports a sustainable school lunch program which provides a hearty and nutritious goat meat-vegetable dish, called Chili Kabrit, to school children.  The Farm-to-Fork program utilizes locally sourced goats and vegetables for preparation of the Chili Kabrit, providing a sustained economic stimulus to agricultural producers in the local community.  Many children in rural communities in Haiti suffer from malnutrition, particularly from a lack of high quality protein in their diets.  Unfortunately, anemia is also common as a result of a lack of dietary sources of iron.  Chili Kabrit meals are formulated to provide a high quality protein source that provides children with 100% of their daily protein, iron and Vitamin A requirements as well as 30% of their Vitamin C requirement and a host of other vitamins and micronutrients in a single, 250-calorie meal supplement.  Currently the project is providing 3450 meals per month served on a weekly basis to three rural schools that have been identified by the Univerisity of Florida as having greater than 85% incidence of anemia.  The Farm-to-Fork program component of the NCSU Haiti Goat Project is run by a team of local Haitians who have been trained in all aspects of its implementation.  The project helps ensure an improved nutritional intake among local children and also provides a market stimulus, empowering local farmers and livestock producers.            

The second major component of the NCSU Haiti Goat Project is aimed at improving the genetic background of Haitian goat stock.  This is accomplished by utilizing reproductive technologies such as artificial insemination to produce high quality meat goat stock sired by genetic lines from the United States and establish a seed stock herd in Gressier Haiti, housed at our project site in collaboration with Christianville Foundation Haiti, our in-country project partners.  These genetically improved animals are made available to Haitian livestock producer groups or sold to other goat production facilities. The Haiti Goat Project currently maintains a seed stock herd of 50 animals for this purpose.  It is anticipated that this herd will eventually be expanded to approximately 85 females in support of this initiative.            

The NCSU Haiti Goat Project also assists with sponsorship of weeklong workshops directed to educating Haitians on how to use a variety of animal source proteins, including poultry, eggs, fish and goats, to improve the diets of children.

In summary, the four main goals of this project are:

1. Provide animal-source foods to local children through school based lunch programs

2. Improve the genetic background of Haitian livestock goats

3. Support education and training of Haitian agriculture producers

4. Promote establishment of sustainable animal agriculture to improve family health and income

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Improving Groundnut Productivity and Profitability in Malawi Development project
Brandenburg, Rick L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 12/31/2021
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Malawi

Providing leadership on a new project funded by USAID through the Palldium Group in Washington D.C. to improve peanut seed production through research and training associated with the implementation of tech packages and drip irrigation.  Collaborating with ExAgris Africa, Ltd. and Horizon Farms in Malawi and leaf growers Limbe Leaf and Alliance One International.  

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Examining the Utility of Satellite-based Assessments in a Maize/Peanut Agroecosystem for Estimated Crop Response in Malawi. Development project
Brandenburg, Rick L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 12/31/2021
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Malawi

Collaborating with Stanford University on a project to assess private satellite images to determine plant health and yield potential for peanuts in Malawi.  This project funded by the Peanut Innovation Lab collaborates with major leaf growers Limbe Leaf and Alliance One Intl to provide field GPS perimeter data and yield data to scientists at Stanford to conduct image analysis and develop forecast models.

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Cassava mosaic disease - A paradigm for the evolution of insect-transmitted plant virus pathosystems Development project
Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda K
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 11/01/2015 - 11/30/2021
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Kenya | Tanzania

PIRE: U.S.-East Africa Research and Education Partnership. "In this project we are asking for the bottlenecks of viral evolution during infection in cassava and during transmission through the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci). We will train our personnel in a tomato model (with a bipartite begomovirus) in the U.S. before going to Africa (particularly in Kenya and Tanzania) to perform our experiments with the native geminiviruses infecting cassava. We anticipate to understand the drivers of selection within the plant host and the vector in order to expand our understanding of the pathosystem"

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NSF-PIRE: U.S. – East Africa Research and Education Partnership: Cassava mosaic disease – A paradigm for the evolution of insect-transmitted plant virus pathosystems Research project
Ascencio-Ibanez, Jose (Trino) Trinidad
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 11/01/2016 - 11/01/2021
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Kenya

This project establishes a research and training partnership between scientists in the U.S. and East Africa to study the evolution of plant DNA viruses, which have emerged as leading pathogens and now threaten food and fiber crops worldwide. Africa’s future depends on increasing food production to meet the needs of its grow­ing population. Over the last decade, there has been dramatic growth in the investments by governments, nongovernmental organizations, international donors and the private sector to develop the scientific expertise and infrastructure necessary to find solutions to the problems that limit African agriculture. The Biosciences Eastern and Central Africa - International Livestock Research Institute (BecA-ILRI) Hub in Kenya and the Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI) in Tanzania were created to solve problems facing African farmers and limiting food security. Hence, a U.S.-East Africa partner­ship represents an excellent international opportunity for re­search synergy and training of U.S. stu­dents and early career sci­entists. Key features of the proposal include the establishment of a research exchange program between labora­tories in the U.S. and East Africa. Postdoc­toral researchers, graduate students and undergraduates will be mentored by a strong in­ternational re­search team, which includes experts on viral population genetics, insect vector transmis­sion and population dynamics, virus/vector/plant interactions, and STEM education. The multidisciplinary nature of the proposed research will provide trainees experience in laboratory and field-based re­search as well as bioinformatics. This will prepare them to become globally engaged, independent scientists with a solid founda­tion in a range of research methodologies and envi­ronments and first-hand experience in productive international and multidisciplinary collaborations.

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U.S. East Africa Research and Education Partnership: Cassava Mosaic Disease - A Paradigm for the Evolution of Insect-transmitted Plant Virus Pathosystems Research project
Kennedy, George G
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 10/01/2015 - 09/30/2021
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s):

This project establishes a research and training partnership between scientists in the U.S. and East Africa to study the evolution of plant DNA viruses, which have emerged as leading pathogens and now threaten crops worldwide. Africa?s future depends on increasing food production to feed its growing population. There has been dramatic growth in the investments by governments, nongovernmental organizations, international donors and the private sector to develop the scientific expertise and infrastructure necessary to find solutions to the problems that limit African agriculture. The Biosciences eastern and central Africa-International Livestock Research Institute (BecA-ILRI) Hub in Kenya and the Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI) in Tanzania were created to solve problems facing African farmers and limiting food security. A U.S.-East Africa partnership represents an excellent international opportunity for research synergy and training of U.S. students and early career scientists. Postdoctoral researchers, graduate students and undergraduates will be mentored by a strong international research team, which includes experts on viral population genetics, insect vector transmission and population dynamics, virus/vector/plant interactions, and STEM education. The multidisciplinary nature of the research will provide trainees experience in laboratory and field-based research as

well as bioinformatics. This will prepare them to become globally engaged, independent scientists with a solid foundation in a range of research methodologies and environments and first-hand experience in international and multidisciplinary collaborations.

Intellectual Merit :

Molecular evolution of plant viruses occurs through mutation, recombination and reassortment of viral genome components, resulting in a high degree of variation. In complex pathosystems, the evolutionary outcomes are influenced by many ecological factors including agricultural practices, insect vector populations, interactions between crops and reservoir plants, and climate. Most of our knowledge of viral evolution is based on field-collected samples, which only provide snapshots of viral diversity at specific times and locations. To examine the full evolutionary potential of plant DNA viruses and the bottlenecks that constrain their evolution, we propose a comprehensive analysis of the drivers of viral genetic diversity, emergence, persistence and spread under tightly controlled experimental conditions. These studies will focus on Cassava mosaic disease (CMD), which is endemic to Africa, and as such rely on the combined expertise and resources of the U.S. and African participants. Our study is transformative in that it will provide a comprehensive framework for examining viral evolution in relationship to the host, the insect vector and the environment using a crop and inoculation methods that accurately reflect real world conditions. Our integrated approach will also serve as a model for examining viral evolution and will inform the development of control strategies for other insect-transmitted viruses that negatively impact plant, animal and human health.

Broader Impacts :Agriculture is increasingly a global enterprise, and it is essential that U.S. scientists work with their counterparts in other countries to better understand plant pathogens as well as their hosts and insect vectors. The proposed experiments will increase our understanding of how plant DNA viruses evolve and the functional constraints on their evolution. They represent an important step in the development of rational, durable control strategies for these important plant pathogens. Cassava is a major food crop in Africa, but its production is severely limitedby CMD. A better understanding of the factors that drive the evolution of the CMD viral complex can be used to prioritize the limited financial and human resources available to combat the disease and to improve the lives of smallholder farmers in Africa. All resulting sequence data and analyses will be available to the broader scientific community through our web-based sequence analysis environment (SNAP Workbench). A unique aspect will be opportunities to communicate with the general public via the NC Museum of Natural Science. Equally important, the proposal provides a framework for recruiting and training a group of diverse, globally-engaged plant scientists to work with researchers around the world to help secure the food and biomass needs of the future.

 

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Borlaug Research Fellowship - Turkey, SNP Markers Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/01/2019 - 08/31/2021
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Turkey

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Borlaug Research Fellowship - Ecuador, cacao metabolites Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/09/2019 - 08/31/2021
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Ecuador

Borlaug Fellow, Dr. María-Elena Cazar works with Dr. De-Yu Xie, professor in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, in a project focused in the characterization of bioactive secondary metabolites from Ecuadorian cacao. The aim of this project is to increase the value of Ecuadorian cacao accessions by the characterization of polyphenols, and monitor polyphenols changes during artisanal cacao processing. María-Elena Cazar values this magnificent opportunity to work with Dr. De-Yu Xie, a renowned scientist in the field of natural products. This experience will be the first step in a fruitful scientific collaboration.

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Unraveling community patterns in the hyperdiverse ants of Madagascar Research project
Blaimer, Bonnie B
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 12/15/2017 - 04/30/2021
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s):

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Management of Colorado potato beetle insecticide resistance in Croatia Research project
Huseth, Anders Schmidt
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 03/01/2019 - 03/01/2021
Country(s): Croatia

Insecticides are the most common management tool for Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) infestations in Croatian potato. After decades of insecticide reliance, Colorado potato beetles throughout the country have developed varying levels of resistance to multiple insecticide modes of action. As a result, growers are dependent on broad spectrum insecticides that have significant negative impacts for human health and the environment. This project is a new collaboration between the University of Zagreb and my program to better understand the spatiotemporal patterns of insecticide resistance throughout the major vegetable producing areas of Croatia. We have leveraged existing bioassay data generated by colleagues in Croatia to identify where problematic Colorado potato beetle populations occur. Deliverable outcomes of this project will facilitate targeted extension messaging about Insecticide Resistance Management (IRM) and alternative Integrated Pest Management (IPM) activities to stem the negative consequences additional pesticide use.

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Proyectos de Investigación en Recursos Genéticos de plantas nativas y Banco de Germoplasma, Research project
Sederoff, Heike
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 11/01/2019 - 01/31/2021
Country(s): Peru

En Arequipa se encuentran dos especies de vegetales nativas de gran valor económico, que en nuestra localidad poca importancia se le da, sin embargo, a nivel internacional lupinos presenta alto impacto por su elevado contenido de proteínas y Chenopodium por su riqueza en el contenido de aminoácidos rico en azufre, estos dos productos presentan grandes propiedades nutricionales. Estas plantas presentan la capacidad de crecer en lugares con poco abono, tal es así que Lupinus es un género que desarrolla simbiosis con bacterias fijadoras de nitrógeno y dentro de un plan de rotación de cultivos se puede cultivar especies del género Chenopodium para el aprovechamiento de los nutrientes. Sin embargo, plantas del género Lupinus y Chenopodium presentan sustancias antinutricionales como los alcaloides y saponinas respectivamente, considerados como elementos antinutricionales, así mismo aún existe poca información sobre las ruta de acumulación de estos productos en las semillas. En la actualidad existen técnicas que permiten apagar genes de forma directa y específica, las repeticiones palindrómicas cortas agrupadas espaciadas regularmente o por sus siglas en inglés CRISPR/CAS (Clustered regulary Interspaced short palindromic repeats), es una técnica moderna de edición de genes con alta especificidad, esta técnica nos permitirá identificar los genes implicados en la biosíntesis y transporte de alcaloides y saponinas, la edición de estos genes permitirá disminuir la concentración de estas sustancias antinutricionales. El producto final de la investigación será obtener dos nuevas variedades nativas de Lupinus y Chenopodium con semillas de alta concentración de proteínas y baja concentración de alcaloides y saponinas. Par conseguir este objetivo, tomaremos muestras de semilla de Lupinus y Chenopodium de la región de Arequipa, y cuantificamos la concentración de proteínas totales alcaloides y saponinas de Lupinus y Chenopodium respectivamente. Ell análisis bioinformático de los mapas genómicos de Lupinus Angustifolium y Chenopodium quinoa nos permitirá identificar las secuencias de los genes implicados en la síntesis temprana de los alcaloides y saponinas, así como sus transportadores asociados para poder sintetizar primer´s conservados y estos serán utilizados en nuestras variedades nativas, para amplificar dichos genes, los productos genéticos obtenidos serán secuenciados y a partir de ellos sintetizan los RNA guías para realizar el constructo con el sistema CRISPR, con estos constructos se realizará las ediciones de Lupinus y Chenopodium, y se seleccionarán aquellas líneas segregantes con baja cantidad de alcaloides y saponinas y con elevadas concentraciones de proteínas, libres del transgen.

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Neutron crystallogaphic structure of Rubisco Research project
Meilleur, Flora
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 09/01/2016 - 01/01/2021
Country(s): United States

Related releases of this project:

-Oak Ridge National Laboratory:

https://neutrons.ornl.gov/content/spinach-used-neutron-studies-could-unearth-secret-stronger-plant-growth

-Sweden:

https://www.uu.se/en/news-media/news/article/?id=12174&area=5,10,16,17,34&typ=artikel&lang=en

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Connecting Research, Education, and Outreach (CREdO) - Peru Development project
Milla-Lewis, Susana Rita
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 03/01/2017 - 12/31/2020
Country(s): United States

Country Leader, Connecting Research, Education, and Outreach (CREdO) - Peru

CALS International Programs is pursuing an innovative model for global engagement. The approach leverages the momentum and positioning of upper-middle-income countries that have fast-growing economies, but have struggled to grow their agricultural research, education, and outreach systems. Project Peru specifically is a CALS initiative in partnership with Concytec (National Council for Science and Technology, Lima, Peru), the Foreign Agricultural Service (US Embassy, Lima, Peru), INIA (National Institute for Agricultural Research, Lima, Peru), and the International Potato Center (Lima, Peru) to develop collaborations between NCSU researchers and extension specialists with their counterparts in Peru in order to strengthen research and extension capacities in Peruvian universities and research centers countrywide. 

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Connecting Research, Education, and Outreach (CREdO) - Peru Development project
Milla-Lewis, Susana Rita
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 03/01/2017 - 12/31/2020
Country(s): Peru

CALS International Programs is pursuing an innovative model for global engagement. The approach leverages the momentum and positioning of upper-middle-income countries that have fast-growing economies, but have struggled to grow their agricultural research, education, and outreach systems. Project Peru specifically is a CALS initiative in partnership with Concytec (National Council for Science and Technology, Lima, Peru), the Foreign Agricultural Service (US Embassy, Lima, Peru), INIA (National Institute for Agricultural Research, Lima, Peru), and the International Potato Center (Lima, Peru) to develop collaborations between NCSU researchers and extension specialists with their counterparts in Peru in order to strengthen research and extension capacities in Peruvian universities and research centers countrywide.

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Evolution of the pheromone signaling system of moths Research project
Schal, Coby J
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 12/31/2020
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Netherlands

Overview.  Researchers have largely ignored close-range courtship behavior by male moths, including the release of close-range sex pheromones, female assessment of the male pheromone, preference, and ultimately acceptance or rejection of the male. This renewal is based on our discovery of novel ‘minor’ compounds in the male pheromone gland with major behavioral effects. While some of these compounds share biosynthetic origins with female-produced pheromones, others are chemically unrelated and appear to be sequestered from larval and adult food. Males appear to use complex close-range signaling that provides females with a dual assessment of the male’s ability (a) of de novo biosynthesis of pheromone compounds similar to hers, and (b) to acquire essential amino acids, and grow on a well-defended plant. We propose to investigate the new male compounds as a novel class of sexual signaling molecules in insects, and to determine how they affect male reproductive success and female choice.

Intellectual Merit.  Three major questions in animal sexual communication are: What features of close-range male sexual signals affect female choice? What information do components of the male’s complex signal convey to the female? Is the production of male sexual signals biochemically and genetically linked to production of female signals? Answers to these questions are critical not only for understanding the roles of reciprocal signaling and mate choice in the evolution of sexual communication systems in animals, but will also lead to a better understanding of how the evolution of mating preferences can lead to premating isolation among populations, and ultimately to the origin of new species. Our overall goal is to understand sex pheromone communication by integrating research at the proximate/reductionist level with experimental and observational research in the field, and with research that addresses ultimate/evolutionary questions. That is, we are interested in elucidating the chemical structures of signal molecules and blends, quantifying behavioral acts and their integration into attractant and courtship displays, understanding mechanisms of pheromone production and reception, and identifying genes that underlie all these processes. At the ultimate level, we seek to understand the evolution of pheromone blends in females and response profiles in males across closely related species and among populations. Many moth species are important pests in agricultural crops; therefore this research has practical significance for society. This project integrates insect mate choice with insect-plant interaction strategies. By signaling to the female at close-range with plant-sequestered compounds, males advertise to females that they have fed on a well-defended plant and that they possess the ability to cope with plant defenses. Moreover, by transferring these plant compounds to his mate, she in turn may provision them to her eggs, inhibit local microbial growth at the oviposition site, and downregulate local plant defenses. The integration of research on female choice with de novo biosynthesized male pheromonal signals and plant-sequestered compounds is innovative and transformative in the chemical ecology/ethology community.

Broader Impacts. This project will train a postdoctoral researcher and a graduate student in a multidisciplinary environment that includes electrophysiology, quantitative analysis of behavior, chemical ecology, and genetics. A unique feature of this project is the collaboration with the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute of Chemical Ecology, which will offer the postdoctoral researcher and graduate student unique opportunities in evolutionary, chemical, and molecular biology, insect physiology, behavior, neurobiology, and plant and analytical chemistry. The project will recruit undergraduates from underrepresented minorities from NCSU and nearby HBUs. We will conduct outreach programs, including hands-on interactive exercises and discussions in biology, live insects and microscopes, and work with the students on biodiversity, insect behavior, and evolutionary biology. Finally, this project will be highlighted in many public education and engagement events in which trainees in this project will participate; these include BugFest, the largest STEM education program in the US (~35,000 participants annually), Science Cafés, the Science of Attraction (300 participants in 2014), and other public education programs.

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Development of an oviposition attractive blend for the sand fly Phelebotomus papatasi, the vector of cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research project
Schal, Coby J
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 12/31/2020
Funding Agency: National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA
Country(s): Peru

Phlebotomine sand flies transmit protozoan parasites (Leishmania spp.), bacterial (Bartonella bacilliformis), and viral pathogens. An alternative approach to the traditional delivery of an insecticide to the vector is to bring the vector to the insecticide using an attractant. In the context of controlling vector-borne disease, oviposition-site attractants are expected to be highly effective because they target gravid females that are responsible for transmission of the pathogen and amplifying vector populations. Decomposing organic matter is the main food source for sand fly larvae. Central to our ongoing and proposed research is the proposition that natural selection has tuned the olfactory system of gravid females to odorants emanating from optimal oviposition substrates that indicate suitable conditions and nutrients for larval development. We therefore hypothesize that gravid sand flies are differentially attracted in a dose-dependent manner to a blend of fecal- and microbially-derived chemical cues associated with the decomposition of fecal material, as well as to signals from eggs and larvae which indicate suitable oviposition sites. Our overall goal is to develop and optimize an attractive blend of semiochemicals that would function as a lure for oviposition-site seeking sand fly females using Ph. papatasi (vector of old-world cutaneous leishmaniasis) as a model system. We will apply an integrated interdisciplinary approach including behavioral, electrophysiological, and microbiological studies to systematically address the following specific aims:

(1)    Identify the most attractive and oviposition stimulating conspecific stages, rearing medium, and saprophytic microbes;

(2)    Isolate and identify oviposition attractants and stimulants from the most attractive conspecific stage, rearing medium, and microbial isolates; and

(3)    Develop an optimal blend of oviposition attractants and stimulants and evaluate it at the micro- and meso-scales.

This proposed study introduces several novel and innovative approaches including: (1) Application of an integrated approach including behavioral, electrophysiological, analytical and microbiological investigations; (2) Study a neglected aspect of oviposition – the role of saprophytic fungi as indicators of suitable oviposition sites; (3) Evaluate the effectiveness of the optimized blends at the scale of meters using a wind-tunnel. Success of this study will set the stage for the next project – a field test of these blends – and would eventually contribute to relieving morbidity and mortality due to sand fly transmitted pathogens.

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Neutron crystallographic studies of Cholesterol Oxidase Research project
Meilleur, Flora
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/31/2020
Country(s): Australia

Description

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Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences Research project
Louws, Frank J
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Center for Integrated Pest Management
Project Dates: 12/14/2015 - 12/13/2020
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Developed a Memorandum of Agreement to advance NC State and CAAS relationships.  

Goals and objectives:

The overarching goal is to establish a Joint Collaboration between North Carolina State University and the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences. The objectives of the Collaboration are to 1) conduct joint research and outreach programs in the fields such as pest management, sustainable agriculture, food security, food safety & nutrition, animal science and genetically modified organisms; 2) develop collaborative Ph.D. training programs and other student/scholar exchange programs; 3) advance technology transfer in a global context; and 4) conduct workshops and other high profile international agricultural events.

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PNIPA Project, Collaborative with Univ. La Molina, Peru: "Adaptation to Marine Floating Cages for "Chita" fish, Anisotremus scapularis: Formulation of feed and Analysis of Growth, for a Traceable Product (translation below) Development project
Hall, Steven
Biological And Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/01/2018 - 11/01/2020
Country(s): Peru

Adaptación al cultivo marino en jaulas flotantes de Anisotremus scapularis “chita”: formulación de alimento y análisis de crecimiento – hacia un producto con trazabilidad

This project, funded by PNIPA and private contributors; focuses on four objectives:

Understanding and Optimizing Production of Chita in Floating Cages in the Marine Environment

Forumlating a Diet for this Species

Developing a System to Enhance Traceability of the Fish, Growers and Processing/Transport

Enhancing Capabilities and HUman Capital of Local Fishermen in such Installations.

The project includes NCSU CALS, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (UNALM); Organizacion en Pro del Desarrollo Sostainable de la Acuicultura in el Peru (PRO Acuicultura), and collaborators.

Named participants include Anibal VErastegui, Steve Hall, Harry Daniels, Luis Icochea, Angel Rivera, Carlos Sotomayor, Matthew Campbell, Leonard Nelson, and Zacarias Alarcon.

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Deciphering Environmental Controls over the Hysteresis of Biome Switches at Savanna-Forest Boundaries Research project
Hoffmann, William A.
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 09/11/2014 - 09/30/2020
Country(s): Brazil

Overview: Understanding what determines the current distribution of biomes is fundamental for projecting how vegetation will respond to future climate and disturbance regimes. Tropical savanna-forest boundaries mark the transition between the two most extensive tropical biomes, yet the factors that determine the location, structure, and dynamics of these boundaries are poorly understood. Our understanding has been hindered by strong positive feedbacks and other non-linear processes that cause complex dynamics and hysteresis (i.e. the dependency of system not only on its current environment but also on its past environment). These legacy effects confound our ability to observe vegetation responses to environmental change.

The proposed research will combine field data and modeling to test for and quantify sources of hysteresis in savanna-forest dynamics. The aims of the research are (1) quantify key processes that underlie switches between savanna and forest states, (2) use this information to refine and parameterize the CLM(ED-SPITFIRE) model for simulating savanna-forest dynamics, and (3) perform simulations to understand environmental controls on the distribution of tropical savanna and forest, with emphasis on causes of hysteresis. This model represents the coupling of a demography-based ecosystem model (ED), a mechanistic model of fire occurrence (SPITFIRE), and a model of land surface processes (CLM) that can optionally be coupled to a general circulation model (CESM).

Much of the data needed to refine, parameterize, and validate the model are available from previous NSF-funded research. Gaps in this information will be resolved with a fire experiment at a natural savanna-forest boundary in Brazil. In the experiment, flammability trials will be used to understand thresholds that mediate vegetation-fire feedbacks. Measurements of biomass production and turnover will quantify the relative roles of primary productivity and mean residence time in governing biome shifts. Monitoring of tree dynamics will provide a more complete understanding of the distinct roles of savanna and forest tree species in these shifts.

 

Intellectual merit: The proposed research aims to understand the sources of hysteresis that confound projections of future vegetation dynamics in the seasonal tropics. This work will make it possible to systematically address uncertainties in modeling savanna-forest dynamics that result from climate feedbacks, fire feedbacks, plant demographic thresholds, and shifts in tree functional types. Furthermore, the field experiment will refine our understanding of ecological and biophysical thresholds that mark the transition between savanna and forest. The research team is uniquely qualified for this work because of the resources brought to the problem, including a state-of-the-art fire-vegetation model that can be coupled to a general circulation model, a growing database of comparative trait data of savanna and forest tree species, and a rare opportunity to establish a fire experiment at a savanna-forest boundary in Brazil.

 

Broader impacts: Savannas and evergreen forests are the most important tropical vegetation types in terms of area, biodiversity, total carbon stocks, and use by humans.  These biomes once covered 82% of the tropical land area and are home to approximately 40% of the global human population and perhaps 50% of all terrestrial species.

Despite an undeniable natural role of fire in tropical savannas, fire suppression is a standard policy in protected areas of savanna in Brazil. Many reserves, particularly those that are small and isolated, are undergoing succession to forest, and causing decline of species adapted to open environments. To promote the acceptance of the natural role of fire, we will prepare an article for the Brazilian popular science magazine Ciencia Hoje and a white paper to be distributed to managers of Brazilian savanna reserves and state ministers of environment. These documents will review the evidence for the natural role of fire and the consequences of fire suppression. As the project generates results, we will invite journalists to visit our study sites to inform the public of the natural role of fire in Brazilian savannas.

We will provide four US undergraduate students with international research experiences that will contribute directly to the research objectives of this proposal. In doing so, we will stimulate interest and expertise in tropical ecology among US students while fostering interactions that we hope will grow into long-term collaborations. 

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Emissions, characterization, and source apportionment of particulate matter from swine production facilities Research project
Wang-Li, Lingjuan
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 09/01/2017 - 09/01/2020
Funding Agency: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), China
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Monitor and analyze particular matter emissions from swine production houses to quantify emission rate, chemical composition and potential sources of the emission of PM.

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Neuronal reorganization underlies evolution of novel adaptive behavior Research project
Schal, Coby J
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 09/15/2016 - 08/31/2020
Country(s): Japan

Overview.  The sensory systems of animals guide adaptive decisions about choice of food, habitat and potential mates. The gustatory system detects and discriminates among tastants that convey information about the quality and nutritional value of food. Gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) are housed within hair-like sensilla in insects that are broadly distributed on chemosensory organs. GRNs can be defined by their modal taste specificity (e.g., sugar- or bitter-GRN) based on the gustatory receptors (GRs) they express. Each specific taste cell projects an axon directly to the central nervous system and guides acceptance and rejection of tastants.

Taste polymorphisms are often described as changes in sensitivity of GRNs within a taste modality, with phenotypes ranging from highly sensitive to completely insensitive to a particular compound. The proposed project addresses a unique gain-of-function natural polymorphism that results in a highly adaptive behavior. In response to selection with baits, populations of the obligatorily commensal German cockroach Blattella germanica have developed behavioral deterrence to glucose and fructose, two universal phagostimulants. This trait is heritable, the rejection behavior is elicited by glucose or fructose alone, and the trait confers significant fitness advantage under selection pressure of glucose- or fructose-containing baits. This project will delineate mechanisms in the peripheral gustatory system responsible for this unusual phenotype with systematic electrophysiological, behavioral, morphological, genetic and molecular analyses. The project will test the hypotheses that (a) glucose and fructose are processed as deterrents by GRNs, (b) different taste organs differ in their GRN organization, contributing to effective processing of tastants as appetitive and aversive stimuli, and (c) that the molecular mechanism(s) that underlie this neuronal change involves either mis-expression of sugar-GRs on bitter GRNs or modifications of bitter-GRs on bitter-GRNs for affinity for glucose or fructose.

Intellectual Merit.  This research is significant to neuroethology and evolutionary biology because it will describe how persistent anthropogenic selection in an urban setting can result in rapid neuronal changes in gustatory function that support new behaviors and new food choices. The proposed research is the first in any animal to (i) characterize rapid changes in the gustatory system that have resulted in the emergence of a new adaptive behavior; (ii) describe in detail a novel system where a single stimulus at the same intensity mediates opposite appetitive and aversive responses by activating different neurons of the same sensory modality; and (iii) characterize the best understood case of behavioral resistance in animals. Finally, studies of the gustatory system in cockroaches, a primitive hemimetabolous lineage, will contribute to a broader understanding of insect gustation that so far has centered mainly on holometabolous and more highly advanced Diptera and Hymenoptera.

Broader Impacts.  Although behavioral resistance is often cited as a major impediment to efficacious pest control, especially of disease vectors, the mechanisms that underlie behavioral resistance are not known. Our recent Science paper and the proposed research represent the clearest delineation of sensory mechanisms that underlie the rapid emergence of a behavioral resistance trait in animal populations. We will recruit and train undergraduates through NCSU’s Honors, HHMI, Caldwell Scholars and Park Scholars programs. Graduate students will be recruited through listserves and local Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Cockroaches are excellent ‘charismatic’ subjects for outreach and STEM activities. STEM outreach activities will include BugFest (35,000 participants annually in one day), Science Cafés, press releases, and the popular media. We have developed several modules on olfactory and gustatory responses of insects to sex pheromones and foods, and the interaction between human-imposed selection and rapid evolutionary adaptations, and we have presented outreach activities at local K-12 schools in disadvantaged communities. In collaboration with faculty at the NC School of Science and Math, we are developing hands-on integrated neurophysiology-behavior modules for NC high schools, and behavioral and electrophysiological assays of glucose-aversion have been incorporated into Insect Physiology and Insect Behavior courses. Our findings are being incorporated into several textbooks and apps on Neurobiology, Behavior and Evolution.

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Conducting Clinical Trial with Post-Doc from Colombia Research project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 05/15/2018 - 08/31/2020
Country(s):

Co-wrote a grant proposal to the Brazilian government in 2018 with a (then) PhD student for the purpose of conducting a clinical trial on coffee's health effects.  After the student graduated with her PhD we were able to find an alternate funding source.  She came to the US to begin her post-doctoral experience in my lab in 2019.  Together, we re-wrote the original proposal and secured IRB approval for the trial.  The clinical trial project is scheduled to begin in March of 2020 and to be completed by the end of August of 2020.

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An investigation into the potential risks of release of transgenic New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax Development project
Scott, Max
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 08/31/2020
Country(s): Panama

The Commission for the Eradication and Prevention of screwworm (COPEG), was created by a Cooperative Agreement signed on February 11, 1994, between Panama and the United States, which became Republic Act (No. 13, May 6, 1999) and subsequently recognized as International Mission.

COPEG objectives are defined in two stages: Elimination and Prevention of screwworm (NWS) in the Republic of Panama, without harming the environment. On July 12, 2006, the country was declared free of the plague and it was the opening of Sterile Fly Production Plant in Pacora.

The Panama plant is the cornerstone of prevention and ensure the maintenance of the biological barrier of sterile flies, which remains from the Province of Darien to 20 nautical miles inside Colombian territory, which is supported by a ground surveillance system. Both activities, in order to safeguard Panama and the rest of the countries of Central and North America of the pest reinfestation.

In addition to these objectives, the organization takes the Epidemiological Monitoring of Vesicular Disease and Prevention of FMD and other emerging diseases of interest to both countries.

 

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Carotenoid bioaccessibility in sweet potato products
Allen., Jonathan C
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2017 - 07/31/2020
Country(s): Kenya

Remotely advising student (Sarah Chilungo) conducting research at International Potato Center, Nairobi, Kenya, and collaborating with staff schientists at that facility.

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Cassava Mosaic Disease susceptibility and resistance: Translation from Arabidopsis to cassava Research project
Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda K
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 08/23/2016 - 07/31/2020
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Tanzania | United States

The goal of this project is to characterize novel DNA sequences that enhance or confer resistance to Cassava mosaic disease, identify new sources of resistance, and provide training for Tanzanian predoctoral and postdoctoral scientists. 

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Developing Effective Lures for Early Detection of the Chinese Fruit Fly Bactrocera minax Research project
Xia, Yulu
Center for Integrated Pest Management
Project Dates: 08/01/2017 - 07/30/2020
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Background:

  • Since 2015, my China projects shift from HLB/ACP to the research intended to prevent fruit flies from China invade U.S.
  • Fruit flies are among the most devastating agricultural pests world wide. The fruit fly such as the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, which widely occur in China, other Asian countries, and Hawaii, can cause huge economic and environmental issues if entering mainland of US. Preventing these pests from invasion of U.S. through trade and traveler relies on our knowledge and scientific understandings such as pest distribution, invasion biology, pest management, and risk mitigation options.
  • USDA APHIS is keen in support research works which contribute the knowledge for prevent these pests from entering U.S., as well as developing techniques for detecting, survey, eradicate these pests.
  • USDA APHIS $1.68 mil, $615,000 match fund and in-kind contribution from local Chinese governments and collaborators. Seven universities and research institutes in China, lab and field studies are being conducted in across China’s

What we did:

  • Test lures in half region of China
    • Effective lure is the first defense if invasion occur
    • Field tests were conducted across China’s entire citrusproduction region
  • Collect, bag, and cut 52,440 (46,400 mandarins, and 6,040 pomelo) citrus fruits in two provinces to study the effectiveness of different pest management techniques. No such a scale was ever conducted in China, might be one of the largest fruit cutting studies ever conducted in the world
  • Study plant volatiles and insect pheromone of fruit fly to develop more potent lure. USDA APHIS CPHST Otis lab, Northwest A&F Univ, and Southwest University of China. First year field test demonstrated that a potential pheromone discovered by Otis Lab can enhance trapping efficacy significantly

Accomplishment & impact:

  • Pre-active going to the country where potential severe threats are, before invasion occur
  • Generated substantial scientific knowledge about severe invasive pests in case of invasion
  • Discovering an urgent technical gap in defending U.S. agriculture, especially the citrus industry, from the invasion of a major pest fruit fly – no lure is effective in detecting low population of the pest, the implication can be significant in case of an invasion occur.
  • Field trap tests were conducted in several locations across China
  • For that reason, a new collaborative project just initiates with participation of USDA-APHIS-Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, Four Chinese institutes: Northwest A&F University, Southwest University, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, and Hunan Academy of Agricultural Sciences to discover more effective lures for attracting the pest. Especially we are working on discovering plant volatiles and insect pheromones. Field experiment indicated one potential pheromone might be effective. And two potential plant volatiles are going to be tested in the field next year.
  • A largest number of fruit cutting was ever conducted to study the efficacy of packinghouse culling and fruit bagging for managing the pest risk. This work was supported locally by then Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Xiamen Customs, Hunan Customs, and Yang’s Enterprise Group.

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Developing a Systems Approach for Pest Risk Management of Tephritid Fruit Flies Associated with the Importation of Fresh Citrus from China Research project
Xia, Yulu
Center for Integrated Pest Management
Project Dates: 08/01/2017 - 07/30/2020
Country(s):

China becomes a major source of agricultural pest and disease invasions to U.S. (and vice versa)

  • Exponential increasing in trade and human traffic from China
  • Climate similarity between U.S. and China
  • Pre-active measure is the most effective in preventing further biological invasions
  • After invasion of huanglongbing (HLB, aka citrus greening, is a very devastating disease--the most severe threat to the U.S. citrus industry with no known cure. The disease was first reported in China about 100 years ago) into U.S. and threat the survival of the multi billion $ U.S. citrus industry, Dr. Ronald Sequeira, associate deputy administrator (then a National Science Program Leader) of USDA APHIS, came to me with a simple question: how can we work together saving U.S. citrus industry fighting this devastating HLB disease. Can we get some basic information out of China where the disease was first reported about 100 years? NCSU – USDA team was formed accordingly.

A total 14 of grants (2010 – present) by USDA-APHIS with a total of funding $3.01 million, another $1.8 match fund and in-kind of support from China.
Focus on two major scientific issues:

  • Understanding HLB epidemiology, pest management, and the insect vector in China
  • Study of the biology and pest risk mitigation of fruit flies for preventing these pests from invasions of U.S.

The primary rationale for this research project is to answer following scientific questions such as:

  • What are the disease epidemiology as well as the current status of the occurrence of the disease and the vector insect, the Asian citrus psyllid, in China?
  • How does Chinese manage the disease/vector? Which measures are effective, which are not such as natural enemies of the pysllids?
  • Is there resistance citrus species/cultivar to the disease?
  • This 4-year projects established a broad collaboration team, with participation of all Chinese universities and research institutes (a total of 12) which were involved in HLB research, such as South China Agri. University, Guangdong Entomological Institute, Fujian Academy of Agri. Sciences, Guangxi Citrus Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agri. Sciences….
  • About $1.4 mil funded by USDA APHIS, and another $1.2 mil match fund and in kind of contribution from local Chinese universities and the provincial governments of Guangdong and Fujian
  • Field and lab studies were conducted across entire HLB occurrence region in Southern China

The primary rationale for this research project is to answer following scientific questions such as:

  • What are the disease epidemiology as well as the current status of the occurrence of the disease and the vector insect, the Asian citrus psyllid, in China?
  • How does Chinese manage the disease/vector? Which measures are effective, which are not such as natural enemies of the pysllids?
  • Is there resistance citrus species/cultivar to the disease?

This 4-year projects established a broad collaboration team, with participation of all Chinese universities and research institutes (a total of 12) which were involved in HLB research, such as South China Agri. University, Guangdong Entomological Institute, Fujian Academy of Agri. Sciences, Guangxi Citrus Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agri. Sciences….

About $1.4 mil funded by USDA APHIS, and another $1.2 mil match fund and in kind of contribution from local Chinese universities and the provincial
governments of Guangdong and Fujian.

Field and lab studies were conducted across entire HLB occurrence region in Southern China.

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PNIPA Project on Capacity Building via enhanced publications Development project
Hall, Steven
Biological And Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 09/01/2019 - 07/01/2020
Country(s): Peru

CURSO DE REDACCIÓN DE ARTÍCULOS DE INVESTIGACIÓN SEGÚN ESTÁNDARES INTERNACIONALES PARA SU PUBLICACIÓN EN REVISTAS INDIZADAS DE ALTO IMPACTO EN ACUICULTURA: This course focuses on capacity building for faculty in Peru (multiple universities), and includes pre-course meetings; an in person course (to be given Feb 2020 by S. Hall and H. Burrack) to improve publishing in international journals.  Followup through summer 2020 will ensure maximum impact. Lead Peruvian PI is Dr. Patricia Gil Kodaka, contract 320-2019 PNIPA

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Pioneering high-frequency in-situ water quality sensors to improve the understanding and management of non-linear dynamics of pollutant fate and transport in complex flowing systems Research project
Birgand, Francois
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/22/2018 - 06/30/2020
Country(s):

Significance/Relevance

Birgand’s program has developed world-leading high-frequency field sampling technologies to capture the temporal variability of flow and concentrations combining newly commercially available in-situ high frequency (e.g., 15 min) spectrophotometers with smart statistical techniques. This has lowered uncertainty on the bulk trend at an unprecedented and remarkable level, but would tremendously benefit from complementary approaches.

 

While on sabbatical leave in the fall of 2017 at the University of Bristol, UK, Dr. Birgand had a chance to connect several times with Dr. Krause and his team at the University of Birmingham, UK. Dr. Krause’s lab pioneers the development of fluorescence based smart tracer systems that are used to analyze the microbial and metabolic processes occurring in streams and at the sediment-water interface that control nutrient spiraling and pollutant turnover. The application of Dr. Krause’s smart tracer technologies therefore provide a unique opportunity to be combined with Dr. Birgand’s sampling technologies and high-frequency detection of solute concentrations in order to for the first time ever combine the detection of high-frequency dynamics of variability of flow and nutrient concentrations through time (Birgand) with a functional analysis of the drivers and controls of nutrient spiraling as well as metabolically active transient storage (Krause).

Being able to do both leverages the information generated by each technique, and is the natural reason for which Birgand and Krause have decided to work together. Krause is particularly interested in a micro-volume in situ analyzer that Birgand’s team has developed, which gives access to both spatial and temporal resolution water quality data. This gives Krause and his team access to crucial information on the fate of nutrients and pollutants in the very reactive near stream area.

Following meetings in Birmingham, Birgand and Krause have decided that the best way to start a collaboration is to bring respective expertise to each other’s’ field sites, where they will, with their respective students, teach and learn respective instruments/techniques.

Feasibility

Birgand’s team has monitored over the last four years a stream restoration, before, during, and currently after restoration, using in situ instruments to obtain ‘continuous’ (i.e., every 15 min) flow and concentrations, a feat that no one in the world has done or at least reported before. The restored stream is thus a new aquatic entity where nutrient turnover and dissipation processes rely on substrate which origin is controlled and generally known. This leverages the potential for stream metabolism experiments to generate more easily interpretable data that will nicely complement the bulk observations derived from continuous monitoring. This will be done using Krause’s techniques and expertise.

Birgand and Krause have already agreed that Brekenfeld would also come in Raleigh in 2018 to build under Birgand’s team guidance, a micro-multiplexed sampler for in situ water quality monitoring of porous media, particularly those around streams, which will leverage Krause’s approach to better trace in time and in space the transport and fate of nutrients and carbon in his study streams in the UK. Brekenfeld did come to Raleigh to build the instrument and Birgand joined Krause’s team to their field sites in the UK in June 2019 to help implement the in situ micro volume sensors and learn on additional tracer techniques, which Krause’s team has applied on their study sites.

 

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Pioneering high-frequency in-situ water quality sensors to improve the understanding and management of non-linear dynamics of pollutant fate and transport in complex flowing systems Research project
Birgand, Francois
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/22/2018 - 06/30/2020
Country(s): UK

Significance/Relevance

Birgand’s program has developed world-leading high-frequency field sampling technologies to capture the temporal variability of flow and concentrations combining newly commercially available in-situ high frequency (e.g., 15 min) spectrophotometers with smart statistical techniques. This has lowered uncertainty on the bulk trend at an unprecedented and remarkable level, but would tremendously benefit from complementary approaches.

 

While on sabbatical leave in the fall of 2017 at the University of Bristol, UK, Dr. Birgand had a chance to connect several times with Dr. Krause and his team at the University of Birmingham, UK. Dr. Krause’s lab pioneers the development of fluorescence based smart tracer systems that are used to analyze the microbial and metabolic processes occurring in streams and at the sediment-water interface that control nutrient spiraling and pollutant turnover. The application of Dr. Krause’s smart tracer technologies therefore provide a unique opportunity to be combined with Dr. Birgand’s sampling technologies and high-frequency detection of solute concentrations in order to for the first time ever combine the detection of high-frequency dynamics of variability of flow and nutrient concentrations through time (Birgand) with a functional analysis of the drivers and controls of nutrient spiraling as well as metabolically active transient storage (Krause).

Being able to do both leverages the information generated by each technique, and is the natural reason for which Birgand and Krause have decided to work together. Krause is particularly interested in a micro-volume in situ analyzer that Birgand’s team has developed, which gives access to both spatial and temporal resolution water quality data. This gives Krause and his team access to crucial information on the fate of nutrients and pollutants in the very reactive near stream area.

Following meetings in Birmingham, Birgand and Krause have decided that the best way to start a collaboration is to bring respective expertise to each other’s’ field sites, where they will, with their respective students, teach and learn respective instruments/techniques.

Feasibility

Birgand’s team has monitored over the last four years a stream restoration, before, during, and currently after restoration, using in situ instruments to obtain ‘continuous’ (i.e., every 15 min) flow and concentrations, a feat that no one in the world has done or at least reported before. The restored stream is thus a new aquatic entity where nutrient turnover and dissipation processes rely on substrate which origin is controlled and generally known. This leverages the potential for stream metabolism experiments to generate more easily interpretable data that will nicely complement the bulk observations derived from continuous monitoring. This will be done using Krause’s techniques and expertise.

Birgand and Krause have already agreed that Brekenfeld would also come in Raleigh in 2018 to build under Birgand’s team guidance, a micro-multiplexed sampler for in situ water quality monitoring of porous media, particularly those around streams, which will leverage Krause’s approach to better trace in time and in space the transport and fate of nutrients and carbon in his study streams in the UK. Brekenfeld did come to Raleigh to build the instrument and Birgand joined Krause’s team to their field sites in the UK in June 2019 to help implement the in situ micro volume sensors and learn on additional tracer techniques, which Krause’s team has applied on their study sites.

 

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Pioneering high-frequency in-situ water quality sensors to improve the understanding and management of non-linear dynamics of pollutant fate and transport in complex flowing systems Research project
Birgand, Francois
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/22/2018 - 06/30/2020
Country(s): UK

Significance/Relevance

Birgand’s program has developed world-leading high-frequency field sampling technologies to capture the temporal variability of flow and concentrations combining newly commercially available in-situ high frequency (e.g., 15 min) spectrophotometers with smart statistical techniques. This has lowered uncertainty on the bulk trend at an unprecedented and remarkable level, but would tremendously benefit from complementary approaches.

 

While on sabbatical leave in the fall of 2017 at the University of Bristol, UK, Dr. Birgand had a chance to connect several times with Dr. Krause and his team at the University of Birmingham, UK. Dr. Krause’s lab pioneers the development of fluorescence based smart tracer systems that are used to analyze the microbial and metabolic processes occurring in streams and at the sediment-water interface that control nutrient spiraling and pollutant turnover. The application of Dr. Krause’s smart tracer technologies therefore provide a unique opportunity to be combined with Dr. Birgand’s sampling technologies and high-frequency detection of solute concentrations in order to for the first time ever combine the detection of high-frequency dynamics of variability of flow and nutrient concentrations through time (Birgand) with a functional analysis of the drivers and controls of nutrient spiraling as well as metabolically active transient storage (Krause).

Being able to do both leverages the information generated by each technique, and is the natural reason for which Birgand and Krause have decided to work together. Krause is particularly interested in a micro-volume in situ analyzer that Birgand’s team has developed, which gives access to both spatial and temporal resolution water quality data. This gives Krause and his team access to crucial information on the fate of nutrients and pollutants in the very reactive near stream area.

Following meetings in Birmingham, Birgand and Krause have decided that the best way to start a collaboration is to bring respective expertise to each other’s’ field sites, where they will, with their respective students, teach and learn respective instruments/techniques.

Feasibility

Birgand’s team has monitored over the last four years a stream restoration, before, during, and currently after restoration, using in situ instruments to obtain ‘continuous’ (i.e., every 15 min) flow and concentrations, a feat that no one in the world has done or at least reported before. The restored stream is thus a new aquatic entity where nutrient turnover and dissipation processes rely on substrate which origin is controlled and generally known. This leverages the potential for stream metabolism experiments to generate more easily interpretable data that will nicely complement the bulk observations derived from continuous monitoring. This will be done using Krause’s techniques and expertise.

Birgand and Krause have already agreed that Brekenfeld would also come in Raleigh in 2018 to build under Birgand’s team guidance, a micro-multiplexed sampler for in situ water quality monitoring of porous media, particularly those around streams, which will leverage Krause’s approach to better trace in time and in space the transport and fate of nutrients and carbon in his study streams in the UK. Brekenfeld did come to Raleigh to build the instrument and Birgand joined Krause’s team to their field sites in the UK in June 2019 to help implement the in situ micro volume sensors and learn on additional tracer techniques, which Krause’s team has applied on their study sites.

 

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Sustainable Agricultural Drainage in the Nile Delta of Egypt Development project
Youssef, Mohamed A
Biological And Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 07/01/2016 - 06/30/2020
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Egypt

Agricultural drainage is essential for crop production in Egypt. Over 78% of Egypt’s agricultural land is artificially drained. Drainage, however, has negative impacts on ground and surface water quality. Drainage mobilizes salts and agricultural chemicals, which may contaminate shallow groundwater aquifers and surface water bodies. Drainage systems must be carefully designed to increase yields, reduce production costs, and minimize nutrient losses from drained farmlands to ground and surface waters. Over-designed drainage systems not only increase installation costs, but more importantly waste the valuable water resource, may lead to yield losses because of the potential increase in dry stresses, and also increase the potential for leaching losses of applied agrochemicals, contaminating ground and surface waters. Despite the dramatic changes in farming practices and the availability of water resource, the design criteria for drainage systems in Egypt has not been updated during the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and evaluate new drainage design criteria that explicitly link the design of drainage systems to crop yields and profits, water quality, and water conservation. A regional study will be conducted to evaluate the performance of existing drainage systems. The new design criteria and framework will utilize the widely used DRAINMOD (drainage water management suite of models). The new design criteria will be evaluated using two field experiments. The results of this project could lead to significant improvement to the drainage design, reducing construction cost, improving yield, conserving water, and reducing pollution load. The excessive surface water pollution and the scarcity of the water resource, currently facing Egypt, make this research proposal timely and critically needed.

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Develop Roman Engineering Class to be Taught in Great Britain in 2020 Study Abroad
Hunt, William F
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/01/2018 - 06/13/2020
Country(s):

Working with Coventry University Faculty, I am developing a Study Abroad Class on Roman Engineering in Britain. The class is slated to be instructed in 2020.

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Student Exchange with NTNU (Trondheim, Norway) Research project
Hunt, William F
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 06/01/2018 - 05/31/2020
Country(s): Norway

Faculty liaison with Norway's technical university (NTNU) on graduate student exchange for research collaboration.

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Thailand - Overview of US Agricultural Policies and Regulations Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 08/21/2019 - 05/20/2020
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Colombia - Gene Editing Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 10/01/2019 - 03/31/2020
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Writing a 100K Strong Grant to Facilitate Student Interchange Between the United States and Mexico for Agricultural Sustainability Projects Development project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 12/16/2019 - 03/02/2020
Country(s): Mexico

Together with the Global Training Institute, I am writing a 100K Strong grant proposal to facilitate student interchange between the United States and Mexico for agricultural sustainability projects.  Potential partners include La BUAP and La UDLAP in Puebla, México, as well as Tec de Monterrey in Querétaro, México.

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Primo-Fruit: Transforming New Zealand Orchards into Annual Cropping Systems Research project
Fernandez, Gina E
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/23/2017 - 01/31/2020
Country(s): New Zealand

 

Dr Fernandez (North Carolina State University, USA) has provided DNA from her primocane-fruiting raspberry mapping population and detailed phenotypic data. She will be a co-author on any manuscripts about the PF gene. The benefits to NZ are the development of new cultivars that will help to protect our fruit industries from the effects of climate 

An agreement already exists between PFR and North Carolina State University (NCSU) detailing an IP arrangement which will allow both parties to use the developed IP in non-commercial and commercial arrangements. Agreements detailing IP management with remaining parties will be put in place before the start of the research programme if they do not already exist. MTA 170536MA

Resulting publication from this collaboration:

Two Loci, RiAF3 and RiAF4, Contribute to the Annual-Fruiting Trait in Rubus. 2019. Published online 2019 Oct 25. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2019.01341

 

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Solar Radiation as a Cue Used by Plants to Forecast Soil-Water Availability Research project
Hernandez, Ricardo
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 09/01/2016 - 01/01/2020
Country(s): Finland | United States

Research collaboration with the University of Helsinki in Finland in the field of Photobiology. Our research program with host a post-doc to work on the use of UV light to prevent transplant shock from water stress. 

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Developing Alternative Water Supply for Northern Jordan Development project
Hunt, William F
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 01/15/2018 - 12/31/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Jordan

Working with Royal Scientific Society (RSS) of Jordan to develop Water Supply systems based on filtered stormwater runoff. The project focuses on areas where Syrian refugees are housed with Jordanian families.

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Borlaug Fellowship Program - Mozambique Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 04/01/2019 - 12/31/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

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Development of a lethal ovitrap for dengue prevention Research project
Schal, Coby J
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2008 - 12/31/2019
Country(s): Peru

Dengue virus infects 50-100 million people and causes ~200,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever annually. In tropical urban areas worldwide, dengue virus is transmitted exclusively by mosquito species utilizing artificial containers as oviposition habitats. Although the most important vector, Aedes aegypti, was almost eradicated from the Americas in the 1960s, the species has become widely disseminated and increasingly associated with intense dengue transmission.  We have made significant progress towards developing a novel lethal trap targeting oviposition behavior in container-inhabiting mosquito species, with a focus on Ae. aegypti. The trap builds on the concept that oviposition is mediated by specific physical and chemical cues in the environment, and once the cues are identified, they can be used not only to improve population monitoring, but more importantly, to create a lure-and-kill control strategy for gravid mosquitoes. Every gravid female eliminated from a population is one less potential vector, and one or more human infections averted. Our work to date has focused on developing three major components needed for this lethal trap: a mosquito-attractive trap design, oviposition attractants and stimulants, and a non-repellent killing medium. We have shown proof of concept for a prototype attractant-baited lethal ovitrap (ALOT) first in large cage trials and then in a pilot-scale field trial conducted in 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specifically, in large cage trials with alternative oviposition sites available, we achieved 97% mortality of gravid Ae. aegypti over 24 hours. We showed that fermentation-derived attractants enhanced the ALOT, as determined by an increase in female mortality and number of eggs retained by gravid females. We identified essential trap color and shape components, and determined the duration of efficacy of trap components in field conditions. We also identified and continue to refine oviposition attractants, stimulants, and their delivery systems.  In the field trial, we deployed 800 ALOTs in a 16 block residential area of New Orleans and compared this to control areas over 14 weeks by monitoring with non-lethal ovitraps, diurnal CO2-baited traps and vacuum aspirators. We are confident that the outcome of this work will be an inexpensive, easy-to-use product which will substantially reduce mosquito populations when deployed alone, or in concert with other control methods targeting this species. It will be especially effective against the most dangerous population member, the previously bloodfed and potentially infective (older) female. Area-wide management of Ae. aegypti with the ALOT promises to be a sustainable strategy because it is based on mosquito biology and behavior. The ALOT will empower communities to make the living and working environments of their residents healthy and safe.

The goal of the proposed project is to demonstrate a reduction in new human infections (from Aedes Stegomyia-borne dengue virus transmission) by area-wide deployment of the ALOT, as a component of community-based dengue management programs. There are 5 objectives to achieve this goal: 1) Finalize structural and toxicant components of the ALOT and validate under field conditions; 2) Complete characterization of oviposition attractants and stimulants, develop delivery systems, and validate under field conditions; 3) Optimize the ALOT containing oviposition attractants and stimulants and validate activity under field conditions; 4) Demonstrate the ALOT efficacy (reduction in mosquito density and dengue incidence) in an experimental field trial; 5) Work with public health officials and vector control experts to establish standards and benchmarks for use of lethal ovitraps. We propose a large scale evaluation of this device in dengue endemic areas in Iqyuitos, Peru, where we will measure changes in mosquito populations and trends in new human dengue infections. We expect that area-wide deployment of the ALOT will result in a measurable decrease in abundance of physiologically old mosquitoes and in new human infections.

This is a collaborative project between Tulane University and North Carolina State University.

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Nexo Global Colombia - Partner's of Americas University of Tolima - NCSU Study Abroad
Oviedo, Edgar O.
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 01/04/2018 - 12/20/2019
Funding Agency: Partners of the Americas, United States
Country(s): Colombia

Description: Student exchange program.  8 students from Colombia and one student from NCSU participated in this program in 2018.

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Colombia - Gene Editing Development project
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 11/30/2019 - 12/13/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Fellows from Colombia traveled to North Carolina and Washington, DC to discuss agricultural gene editing advancements and policies in the U.S. to help further shape and understand Colombian policies. Through a variety of meetings with federal regulators, NC State University scientists and researchers, and private companies, the Fellows gained insight into the impact agricultural gene editing has on the agricultural industry as a whole.

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Algeria - U.S. Feed Formulation Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 11/09/2019 - 11/22/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Cochran Fellows from Algeria traveled to the US to explore animal feed formulation for the poultry industry. This training brought them to North Carolina and then Missouri to meet with NC State faculty and researchers, governmental entities, trade organizations, and public and private companies and farms. Through these meetings, the Fellows learned about formulation techniques, limitations and uses of common ingredients, new technological trends, quality control, and overall best practices so they can adapt their practices to meet poultry nutritional needs in Algeria.

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Cote d'Ivoire and Senegal - School Meals Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 05/01/2019 - 11/05/2019
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Safety of vegetable fermentations Research project
Breidt, Fred
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 10/29/2018 - 10/29/2019
Country(s): Korea, South

 Invited to the 16th International Fermented Food Expo (IFFE)” in 2018, held from October 26th (Fri), 2018 at Jeonbuk institute for Food-Bioindustry in Jeonju, South Korea. Presented a special lecture for the area relevant to “the world of fermented foods.” The IFFE in conjunction with the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea (MFDS) covered expenses. Met with officials of the MFDS and establisted an internatinal reaserach project for the coming year to do basic research on the safety of Kimchi and related fermented vegetables. 

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Agricultural and Gastronomic Tour of Italy 2019 Training/Workshop
Tiezzi, Francesco
Animal Science
Project Dates: 09/28/2019 - 10/06/2019
Country(s): Italy

The tour focused on the region of Tuscany, which provides the opportunity to dive into different industries (crop, livestock, food and agri-tourism) blended with unique cultural and humanistic attractions.

The tour was dense with farm visits.
It spanned from hi-tech greenhouses to minimum-input silvo-pastoral livestock farms, to aquaculture, to pasta-making with heirloom wheat varieties. All this has been pulled together keeping best agricultural practices in mind and in order to give the participants a line-up that could not be found from other sources. 


Specifically, visits included:

- three dairy farms (cattle, sheep, bufalo) that sell a variety of products,
- two cereal farms, that market pasta and rice though direct sale and on-farm restaurant,
- a silvo-pastoral beef cattle & hog farms, with butcher and charcuterie shop,
- two Chianina beef cattle farms, with on-farm restaurant,
- a high-tech 30-acres greenhouse, that produces tomato, strawberry and micro-greens,
- a cooperative aquaculture facility, with a restaurant that serves the raised fish,
- a micro-brewery, that grows its own barley,
- a winemakers association tasting and marketing room.
 

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Thailand - Agricultural Policies and Regulations Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 09/21/2019 - 10/04/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Regulatory officials from Thailand visited Washington DC and North Carolina to learn about the U.S. regulatory system for agricultural products and commodities. The training provided the fellows with insight as to how the U.S. formulates its policies and regulations. The fellows met with federal and state governmental entities, non-profits, NC State faculty, and private corporations to discuss how to approach the formulation of new policies regulations in Thailand.

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Turkey - Agricultural Innovation and Safety Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 02/01/2019 - 09/30/2019
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Borlaug Fellowship Program - Morocco Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 09/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Borlaug Fellowship program to host international fellow from Morocco to work with Dr. Hamid Ashrafi in his blueberry genetics and genomics lab.  The overall objectives of  the fellowship work was to aid in the development small fruit berry crops in Loukkos, Morocco.  While at NC State University, the fellow was able to investigate micropropagation techniques for blueberries and other small fruit berry crops, conduct field blueberry breeding research, assess small fruit berry varieties, and conduct quality tests.   

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Borlaug Fellowship Program - Kenya Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 06/01/2018 - 09/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

CGIAR Borlaug Fellow working with Dr. Jean Ristaino as the NC State faculty mentor.  Fellow conducted research on Phytophera infestans population structure and pathogen evolution in eastern Africa. Fellow has has mapped the pathogen population in five eastern Africa countries as a basis for P. infestans surveillance in the region.  Additionally, she has generated pathogen data for the potato national breeding programs interested in a particular European potato variety as well as CIP’s potato biotechnology breeding group, that can be used for future deployment of the 3R transgenic potato for Africa.

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BFP17 Morocco (Hamim) Biotech @NCSU
Ashrafi, Hamid
Horticultural Science
Bioinformatics Research Ctr
Project Dates: 08/15/2017 - 09/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

We developed a joint project between an American higher education institute and USDA-FAS (Foreign Agricultural Service) to enhance researcher capacities to develop, promote, and defend the safe use of biotechnology in the promotion of global food security. In collaboration with Jose Cisneros we submitted a proposal to Borlauge institute and through USDA-FAS we were awarded $39,500 to host in a visitor scientist from Moroco to work on blueberry genemoics.

She was supposed to be in here in the U.S. in Oct 2017 but due to visa delay she is going to travel in the first quarter of 2018.   

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Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development (BHEARD-USAID) Development project
Allen., Jonathan C
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 08/01/2014 - 09/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Malawi

Doctoral student training in human nutrition with a focus on hypertension treatment centers in Malawi.

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Genetic Data Analysis for Plant and Animal Breeding Training/Workshop
Tiezzi, Francesco
Animal Science
Project Dates: 09/23/2019 - 09/27/2019
Country(s): Italy

Genetic Data Analysis for Plant and Animal Breeding

September 23-27, 2019, Montepulciano, Tuscany, Italy

Organized by:
North Carolina State University, USA

Organizing committee:
Dr. Francesco Tiezzi (NC State University), Email: f_tiezzi@ncsu.edu
Dr. Riccardo Bozzi, (University of Florence), Email: riccardo.bozzi@unifi.it

Instructors:
Christian Maltecca (NC State University, Animal breeding), Francesco Tiezzi (NC State University, Animal breeding), Fikret Isik (NC State University, Forest Tree Breeding), Guest lecturer (NC State University, Crop Breeding).

Registration:
Workshop registration cost is $1150 USD. Registration includes lunches, two coffee breaks per day, a welcome and a farewell dinner. It does not include lodging and travel expenses.


About the Workshop:
The workshop will be taught at an intermediate to advanced level. Participants are expected to have some understanding of the theory of mixed models.
This is a hands-on workshop. Participants are expected to work on exercises related to crops, animal and forest trees. You may bring your own laptop and your own data to work on after lectures.
Workshop format: Four sets of lecture + exercise per day. Each set will be a about 30-minute lecture and 60- minute exercise. See example below.

Software:
The exercises will demonstrate use of ASReml, R packages, and additional tools for data analysis. Some familiarity with R syntax will be expected. A temporary free license for ASReml will available at the time of workshop.


Workshop outline:
The workshop will mostly follow the textbook Isik-Holland-Maltecca (2017) Genetic data Analysis for Plant and Animal Breeding with hands-on examples.
The tentative outline is as follows:
Theory of linear mixed models ASReml software basics and options Breeding values and genetic values
Multi environmental trials using factor analytic models Spatial analysis of field test data
Explanatory marker data analysis
Imputing missing genotypes
Realized genomic relationships matrix and GBLUP Marker-trait associations
Genome-wide selection

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Guest thesis committee member Research project
Whitfield, Anna Elizabeth
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 09/27/2019 - 09/27/2019
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Served as guest thesis evaluator at Nanjing Agricultural University. Advised 6 students while visiting the university. 

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HPLC and SOTL Training for Argentinian High School Teachers Training/Workshop
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 09/12/2019 - 09/23/2019
Country(s):

Partnered with the Global Training Initiative to teach visiting Argentinian scholars on three separate occasions about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and about HPLC.

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Peru- Resilient Agriculture Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 04/10/2019 - 08/31/2019
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Changes in the chemical and structural composition of sugar cane bagasse caused by alkaline pretreatments (CaOH2 and NaOH) modify the cellulose profile produced by Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation Research project
Gardner, Terrence
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 09/11/2018 - 08/31/2019
Country(s): Mexico

Forestry management systems affect soil properties, but few it is known about the response in bioindicators related to these changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of bioindicators to sense the litter and soil (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm) state of two different Cedrela odorata forestry management systems; a monoculture (with no fertilization nor irrigation) and a coculture (with fertilization and irrigation) with Citrus latifolia. The soil bioindicators measured were those associated with total microbial activity: the enzyme activity of acetylesterase (FDA), acid phosphatase (AcPh), alkaline phosphatase (AlkPh), laccase, and the estimation of the potential net rate of carbon mineralization (PNRCM). Our results indicate that soil enzyme activities (FDA and phosphatases) were sensitive to different management systems in the litter; both activities increase with organic matter. Enzymatic activity was higher in litter of coculture (FDA = 0.063 ± 0.007 U.g-1DW; AcPh = 0.8 ± 0. 08 U.g-1DW; AlkPh = 0.18 ± 0. 003 U.g-1DW) than in litter of monoculture (FDA = 0.037 ± 0. 006 U.g-1DW; AcPh = 0.24 ± 0. 03 U.g-1DW; AlkPh = 0. 059 ± 0. 005 U.g-1DW). There were no significant differences in soil enzyme activity between forestry management, however, differences in total nitrogen amount, organic matter content, and micronutrients were found. This indicates that changes in microbial activity, due to the management system, are occurring mainly in the litter than in the soil. We conclude that the use of these bioindicators (with exception of laccase) is suitable for litter and soil diagnosis in forestall plantations in the tropic

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Turkey - Agricultural Innovation and Safety Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 08/18/2019 - 08/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Turkish Fellows participated in the Cochran training program to investigate agricultural biotechnology and how it fits in to the bigger picture of innovation that enables farmers to meet 21st century challenges of climate change, environmental degradation, water shortages, and growing food demand. Through a variety of meetings with federal and state regulators, NC State University scientists and researchers, private companies and farmers, the Fellows were exposed to agricultural biotechnology policies and practices in the US.

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Turkey - Agricultural Innovation and Safety Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 10/18/2019 - 08/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Turkish Fellows participated in the Cochran training program to investigate agricultural biotechnology and how it fits in to the bigger picture of innovation that enables farmers to meet 21st century challenges of climate change, environmental degradation, water shortages, and growing food demand. Through a variety of meetings with federal and state regulators, NC State University scientists and researchers, private companies and farmers, the Fellows were exposed to agricultural biotechnology policies and practices in the US.

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Elucidating the Effects of Structure on the Redox Reactivity of Mycogenic Mn Oxide Nanoparticles. Research project
Duckworth, Owen W
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 11/01/2014 - 08/15/2019
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Switzerland

Description

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HPLC/UPLC Training Course in Arequipa, Perú Training/Workshop
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 08/04/2019 - 08/10/2019
Country(s): Peru

In addition to HPLC training, the visit also involved:

  • Two Presentations
  • Meetings with Food Science Faculty
  • Setting Up Research Agreements

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ANS 395 Animal Behavior and Vet Physiotherapy in UK Study Abroad
Trivedi, Shweta
Animal Science
Project Dates: 07/19/2019 - 08/03/2019
Country(s):

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Myanmar - Animal Nutrition Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 07/21/2019 - 08/02/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Fellows from Myanmar traveled to the US for their training on animal nutrition. This training brought them to North Carolina, Virginia and Missouri. Throughout the program, the Fellows learned about the raw ingredients that go into animal feed, procurement techniques, regulatory issues, animal feed processing, quality control, storing and handling, and meeting animal nutrition needs. Through a variety of visits with regulatory bodies, farmers, feed mills, and processing plants, the Fellows were able to develop new connections in the US.

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CAREER: Assessing the Reactivity and Diversity of Neutrophilic Iron Oxidizing Bacteria in Terrestrial Aquatic Environments Research project
Duckworth, Owen W
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 07/31/2019
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Switzerland

Despite their ubiquity and high visibility, rust colored iron oxide deposits remain a poorly understood feature of rivers, lakes, and springs. Until recently, it was assumed that these deposits were formed by abiotic chemical processes; however, recent studies have shown that these deposits often result from the action of specific iron oxidizing bacteria. These bacterial iron oxides may have very different properties than those abiotic oxides that are traditionally used by geochemists in laboratory experiments designed to probe environmental and geochemical reactivity. The overall goal of the project is to characterize the structure, reactivity, and biological diversity of these iron oxide deposits to better understand the multifaceted roles they may play in the environment. To achieve these goals, we will conduct a suite of field, laboratory, microbiological, and spectroscopic analyses aimed at determining key properties of both the iron oxides and the bacteria associated with their formation.

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Senegal and Ivory Coast - U.S. School Meals Program Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 07/14/2019 - 07/26/2019
Country(s):

Fellows first met in the Washington DC for meetings with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to learn about the U.S. school meals program before before departing to NC State, where meetings will continue with faculty members, NC governmental agencies, and local schools.

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Research Pack Abroad: International Research Experience Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 05/20/2019 - 07/19/2019
Country(s): Spain

Management of undergraduate research experience in Villaviciosa, Spain and Valencia, Spain where students were immersed in the local culture while working with international researchers at the Dairy Istitute of Asturias (Instituto de Productos Lacteos de Asturias) and Universitat Politècnica de València, respectively. 

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Hosting a Peruvian Professor at NC State to Plan Research Collaborations Development project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 07/17/2019 - 07/18/2019
Country(s):

Hosted a visiting Peruvian professor from la UNSA (University of Saint Augustin) in order to:

  • Discuss possible collaborations
  • Familiarize him with NC State's facilities in Raleigh and at Kannapolis
  • Plan an HPLC training workshop in Perú.

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Sustainable Ag Development, China Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/01/2018 - 06/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

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Metabolic and cardiovascular effects of anthocyanins and other phenolics Research project
Komarnytsky, Slavko
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Plant Biology
Project Dates: 07/01/2017 - 06/30/2019
Country(s): Australia | New Zealand

With time, inflammation can become a chronic condition that causes continuous damage to adipose, muscle, and connective tissues. During chronic inflammatory immune responses, tissue injury and healing proceed simultaneously and lead to severe tissue deterioration, thus underpinning the lifestyle and age-related diseases. We seek to discover novel molecular targets and develop effective nutritional strategies against inflammation and age-related diseases in preclinical models and clinical human studies targeting metabolic, cardiovascular, microbiome, and age-related outcomes. The gained knowledge will position us at the forefront of human health research, allow us to capitalize on synergistic interdisciplinary expertise, generate data to support joint proposals, allow for student and young faculty mobility, and ultimately lead to new treatments for patients with chronic lifestyle and age-related diseases. 

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Bilateral Danish-USA networking to increase yields and resource efficiency in organic crop production Research project
Reberg-Horton, Chris
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 06/30/2019
Country(s): Denmark | United States

The demand for organic food products has increased dramatically over the past years. In both Denmark and USA the organic sector is growing, but production is lower than demand. In spite of more than twenty years of research on organic crop production, crop yields are in practice still way below potential. There are 4 significant reasons for this: 1) the availability of nutrients already present does not match plant needs due to lack of focus on importance of individual nutrients 2) the availability of nutrients already present does not match plant needs due to poor synchronization in time 3) lack of sufficient nutrien sources 4) existing knowledge is not sufficiently implemented in practice Nutrient balances and soil fertility issues both need more attention in organic systems. Balancing N and P inputs is challenging when manure inputs are a main source of P. Organic farmers are encouraged to augment their production of N via legumes in various portions of the crop rotation, thus allowing lower animal manure application rates to reduce chances of loading soils with too much P. A different approach, however, might be more appropriate where P is more limiting. There are also basic issues of whether the standard soil tests developed for fertilizer-based nutrient applications are adequate for evaluating soil nutrient availability in organic systems that have larger organic matter pools. Denmark and USA share the need to improve resource efficiency in organic crop production and will join forces to focus on optimizing nutrient supply and efficient implementation practices. 

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Evaluation of Silvopastoral Systems in Amazonas, Peru, as a Strategy for Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change Research project
Castillo, Miguel Sebastian
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2016 - 06/30/2019
Country(s): Peru | United States

This is a 3-yr project (April 2016 to Dec. 2018) in the Amazonas region of Peru, South America. The overall goals of the project are to: 1) describe the silvopastoral systems utilized by producers in terms of production and socio-economical characteristics, 2) develop a decision-tool for evaluation of activities in the silvopastoral systems, and 3) provide a system for evaluation and financial support. The three institutional partners from Peru are: Universidad Agraria La Molina, Universidad Nacional Toribio Rodriguez de Mendoza, and Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA). 
 
Innovación en la Evaluación de Sistemas Silvopastoriles de Selva Alta Peruana como Estrategia de Adaptación y Mitigación al Cambio Climático
Enfoque: Entendimiento y desarrollo de sistemas y modelos silvopastoriles de Selva Alta Peruana.
Institucion que financia el proyecto: Programa Nacional de Innovación Agraria PNIA
Nombre de instituciones involucradas: Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Universidad Nacional Toribio Rodríguez de Mendoza, North Carolina State University, Insituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria.

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Integrated assessment of South African watershed bacterial communities critical to human health and welfare Development project
Komarnytsky, Slavko
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Plant Biology
Project Dates: 07/01/2012 - 06/30/2019
Country(s): South Africa

The overall objective of the envisaged long term collaborative program between NCSU and UP will be to develop a better understanding of the overall bacterial diversity in watersheds and impoundments of South Africa, and to determine what impact it may have on the health of water users. As this is a broad research goal that will require the input of various research disciplines, it was decided that the initial proposal would focus on characterization of the bacterial diversity on aquatic plants, with special emphasis on E. coli, and determination of the impact they may have on human health. Specifically, we will isolate E. coli and other bacteria associated with aquatic plants in the watersheds of South Africa and identify these isolates based on partial rpoS and uidA sequencing (Aim 1, UP). These strains will be made available to the Plants for Human Health Institute, where we will further investigate these cultures for their growth kinetics, mobility, biofilm formation, and adhesion parameters critical to human health. The bioactive metabolites produced by the isolates will be further investigated in the pairwise phenotypical screening platform using mammalian cell culture to understand their pharmacological and/or pathological effects on human health in the area of metabolic disease and inflammation (Aim 2, NCSU). An interdisciplinary partnership “Center for Sustainable Health and Biodiversity (CSHB)” will be created to coordinate the future research efforts and funding applications (Aim 3, shared).

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International SEXSEED Consortium Research project
Franks, Robert G
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 06/15/2016 - 06/15/2019
Country(s): Australia | Ireland | Italy | Portugal | United States

  • International SEXSEED Consortium (http://www.fc.up.pt/sexseed/) - Consortium of eight labs focused on the molecular mechanisms of seed development.  In addition to my lab the other participant labs are Silvia Coimbra (Universidade Do Porto, Portugal), Lucia Colombo (University of Milano, Italy), Charles Spillane (National University of Ireland), Emilio Albertini (Universita Degli Studi Di Perugia, Italy), Matthew Tucker (University of Adelaide, Australia), Brian Jones (University of Sydney, Australia), Ravishanker Palanivelu (University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona)

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Peru and Ecuador - Resilient Agriculture Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 05/26/2019 - 06/08/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Ecuatorian and Peruvian fellows spent 2 weeks in North Carolina to learn about resilient agriculture and best practices to minimize risks of climate swings.  The objective of this program was to increase knowledge of climate smart agriculture practices. During this program the Fellows will receive training on soil management, crop modeling and disseminating information. Effective extension practices will also be covered in this training program.  Through a combination of lectures, workshops with professors and researchers from the NC State University and researchers from the USDA-ARS and the USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub (SERCH), the fellows increased their knowledge on climate smart agriculture practices.

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Peru and Ecuador - Resilient Agriculture Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 05/26/2019 - 06/08/2019
Country(s):

Fellows from Ecuador and Perú spent 2 weeks in North Carolina to learn about resilient agriculture and best practices to minimize risks of climate swings.  The objective of this program was to increase knowledge of climate smart agriculture practices. During this program the Fellows will receive training on soil management, crop modeling and disseminating information. Effective extension practices will also be covered in this training program.  Through a combination of lectures, workshops with professors and researchers from the NC State University and researchers from the USDA-ARS and the USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub (SERCH), the fellows increased their knowledge on climate smart agriculture practices.

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Workshop on Bioinformatics and Plant Molecular Biology, Arequipa Peru Training/Workshop
Rojas-Pierce, Marcela
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 05/22/2019 - 05/31/2019
Country(s): Peru

Drs. Heike Sederoff and Marcela Rojas-Pierce led a workshop on Bioinformatics and Plant Molecular Biology at the National University of San Agustin (UNSA), in Arequipa, Peru. The workshop was divided into seminars in the morning, with topics ranging from modern molecular plant biology, an introduction bioinformatic tools and research talks from all five group members. In the afternoon, students and faculty members of UNSA gained hands-on experience doing DNA and RNA extraction, amplification and PCR as well as microscopy in the lab sessions led by two graduate students, Nathan Wilson and Eli Hornstein, and a Research Assistant, Cristina Salinas, from the Sederoff lab. 

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ANS 395 Wildlife Management & Conservation in South Africa Study Abroad
Trivedi, Shweta
Animal Science
Project Dates: 05/13/2019 - 05/31/2019
Country(s): South Africa

COURSE INFORMATION

Credits: 3

Pre-requisites: none

 

COURSE STRUCTURE & LOCATION

The 2 week course begins with students meeting in Thankerton Game Reserve near Gravelotte, South Africa.  Students will be expected to attend demonstrations and participate in field activities at the privately owned game reserves that Dr. Chris Boshoff (veterinarian) will be working at.   The day to day location varies within the Limpopo Province of South Africa depending on clinical cases.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course is an overview of the field strategies and veterinary techniques that wildlife veterinarians and biologists use in management and conservation of the wildlife.  The course will give students a better understanding about how wildlife veterinarian assists game farmers in breeding and conservation of endangered wild animals.   The course will be taught with the logistical support and assistance from SA World Vets  (http://www.saworldvets.com/Conservation/SA_WorldVets_Wildlife_Vets_South_Africa.html)

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Peru and Ecuador - Pasture Management Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 11/23/2018 - 04/30/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

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How to be a “Connector”: Linking Campus, International Opportunities, and Visiting Scholars Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 04/01/2019 - 04/05/2019
Country(s): Trinidad and Tobago

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Develop WaterSupply/ Rainwater Harvesting Recommendations for Cape Verde through Coventry University Development project
Hunt, William F
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 11/01/2018 - 02/28/2019
Country(s):

As part of the Royal Academy of Engineers (UK) fellowship, I am obliged to help Coventry University develop rainwater harvesting guidance for the Cape Verde Islands.

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Collaborative relationship with the Japan Plant Factory Association Development project
Hernandez, Ricardo
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 02/20/2018 - 02/28/2019
Country(s): Japan

Collaborative relationship with the Japan Plant Factory Association. Co-organized and hosted a conference “Ag Tech Collides” (https://cals.ncsu.edu/event/ag-tech-worlds-collide/) February 2018, Raleigh, NC. In this conference four Japanese companies and three invited speakers presented innovations in plant factory to companies, government agencies and entrepreneurs in the USA. (total attendees: 70). After conference the Japan Plant Factory Association and my program continue to collaborate in research and academic programs

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INIA - Climate Change and Production Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 01/28/2019 - 02/08/2019
Funding Agency: Instituto Nacional de Innovacion Agraria (INIA), Peru
Country(s):

Fellos from the INIA (Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria – National Institute for Agrarian Innovation) spent 2 weeks in and around Raleigh to learn about how NC State addresses grand challenges in research and extension.  While in North Carolina, the fellows met with NC State faculty and researchers and also traveled around the state to research centers and private farms.  The topics the fellows discussed included  climate change, research methods, soil nutrition, potato agriculture and extension.  We hope this is just the start of a long-lasting collaboration with INIA to address training needs and research collaborations.

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India - Biotechnology and Biosafety Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 11/15/2018 - 02/04/2019
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

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Hops as a natural antimicrobial in pickled vegetable products
Breidt, Fred
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 02/01/2017 - 02/01/2019

Material transfer research agreement 

Share hops materials and research resuts to develop methods for using hops in acidified vegetable products without significant flavor impact

Dr. Changho Chung

                                    Dept. of Culinary Science and Food Service Management

Sejong University,

98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu

Seoul, 143-747, South Korea

                                    Tel: +822 3408-3222

                                    Fax: +822-3408-4313

                                    Email: cchung@senong.ac.kr

 

ISU:                Dr. Byron Brehm-Stecher

                                    Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition

                                    2312 Food Sciences Building

                                    Iowa State University

                                    Ames, IA50011-1061

                                    Tel: 515-294-6469

                                    Fax: 515-294-8181

                                    Email: Byron@Iastate.edu

 

 

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Pakistan - Soybeans and Dry Distiller Grains Processing Cochran Training Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 12/31/2018 - 01/30/2019
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

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Living with water: Classic Maya pond management at El Perú-Waka', Petén, Guatemala Research project
Ricker, Matthew C.
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2016 - 12/31/2018
Country(s): Guatemala

This research is part of an interdisciplinary regional archaeology project working to understand the techniques utilized by the ancient Maya to manage urban water systems at El Perú-Waka' in northern Guatemala. 

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Plant-Nematode Interactions Development project
Davis, Eric L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/31/2018
Country(s): Costa Rica

Description

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Plant-Nematode Interactions Development project
Davis, Eric L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/31/2018
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Description

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Molecular Plant-Nematode Interactions Development project
Davis, Eric L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: - 12/31/2018
Country(s): Netherlands

Description

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Optimizing site-specific solar radiation modeling for its application in the horticultural, agricultural, and photonics industries- Research project
Hernandez, Ricardo
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/05/2017 - 12/28/2018
Funding Agency: Academy of Finland, Finland
Country(s): Finland

Hosting a Postdoctoral research Associate (2017-2018) Titta Kotilainen Ph.D.

Project title and description: Optimizing site-specific solar radiation modeling for its application in the horticultural, agricultural, and photonics industries- This project, funded by Academy of Finland is a joint effort between University of Helsinki, Department of Bioscienes, Division of Plant Biology; NC State University, Department of Horticultural Science (R. Hernández); Stockbridge Technology Centre (UK); Kauppapuutarhaliitto (association for Finnish growers); and Photonics Finland. Partial funding provided by the Science Academy of Finland.

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India – Biotechnology and Biosafety - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 12/01/2018 - 12/15/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The Indian Fellows arrived in DC to kickoff their 2 week training.  While in DC, the group met with USDA, CGIAR International Food Policy Research Institute, APHIS, EPA, and FDA to discuss biosafety.  The Fellows then traveled to Raleigh for the remaining of their training.   While in Raleigh they met with NC State Faculty who have a biotechnology and biosafety research focus.  The second week was greeted by Snowstorm Diego, which left considerable snowfall.  After digging out from the snow, the Fellows were able to complete their training by visiting the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, BASF, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center and meet with North Carolina Growers Associations.  The objective of the training was to expose the Fellows, who serve as regulators in India, to the U.S. approach of biotechnology regulation and biosafety and to help India develop its biotechnology regulatory framework to reduce barriers to trade in GE food and agricultural products.

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India – Biotechnology and Biosafety Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 12/01/2018 - 12/14/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): India

Seven agricultural professionals from India came to the U.S. from December 1 - 14, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Biotechnology and Biosafety at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. The Indian Fellows arrived in DC to kickoff their 2 week training. While in DC, the group met with USDA, CGIAR International Food Policy Research Institute, APHIS, EPA, and FDA to discuss biosafety. The Fellows then traveled to Raleigh for the remaining of their training. While in Raleigh they met with NC State Faculty who have a biotechnology and biosafety research focus. The second week was greeted by Snowstorm Diego, which left considerable snowfall. After digging out from the snow, the Fellows were able to complete their training by visiting the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, BASF, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center and meet with North Carolina Growers Associations. The objective of the training was to expose the Fellows, who serve as regulators in India, to the U.S. approach of biotechnology regulation and biosafety and to help India develop its biotechnology regulatory framework to reduce barriers to trade in GE food and agricultural products.

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India - Biotechnology and Biosafety Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 12/01/2018 - 12/14/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Fellows from India arrived in Washington, DC to kickoff their 2 week training.  While in DC, the group met with USDA, CGIAR International Food Policy Research Institute, APHIS, EPA, and FDA to discuss biosafety.  The Fellows then traveled to Raleigh for the remaining of their training.   While in Raleigh they met with NC State Faculty who have a biotechnology and biosafety research focus.  The second week was greeted by Snowstorm Diego, which left considerable snowfall.  After digging out from the snow, the Fellows were able to complete their training by visiting the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, BASF, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center and meet with North Carolina Growers Associations.  The objective of the training was to expose the Fellows, who serve as regulators in India, to the U.S. approach of biotechnology regulation and biosafety and to help India develop its biotechnology regulatory framework to reduce barriers to trade in GE food and agricultural products.

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Ecuador and Peru – Pasture Management - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 11/25/2018 - 12/08/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The Eduador and Peru Fellows spent 2 weeks in and around Raleigh, North Carolina to receive training on pasture management in order to increase the health and production of the animals in their respective home countries.  Through this Cochran Fellowship, the Fellows met with scientific experts within the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the USDA Farm Service Agency.  Additionally, they met with NC State University faculty involved in pasture management, grass breeding, livestock nutrition, silvopastures, and forages and pastures research.  To round out the training, the Fellows also visited local farms as well as NC State University experimental research facilities.  The objective of the training was to expose the Fellows to best management practices to help maximize the health of their animals while conserving pastures for the future.

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Ecuador and Peru – Pasture Management Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 11/25/2018 - 12/08/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Ecuador | Peru

Seven agricultural professionals from Ecuador and Peru came to the U.S. from November 25 -December 8, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Pasture Management at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. The Eduador and Peru Fellows spent 2 weeks in and around Raleigh, North Carolina to receive training on pasture management in order to increase the health and production of the animals in their respective home countries. Through this Cochran Fellowship, the Fellows met with scientific experts within the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the USDA Farm Service Agency. Additionally, they met with NC State University faculty involved in pasture management, grass breeding, livestock nutrition, silvopastures, and forages and pastures research. To round out the training, the Fellows also visited local farms as well as NC State University experimental research facilities. The objective of the training was to expose the Fellows to best management practices to help maximize the health of their animals while conserving pastures for the future.

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Visit to Peru to Generate Research and Teaching Collaborations Development project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 11/27/2018 - 12/04/2018
Country(s): Peru

The Department of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences, and the CALS Office of International Programs co-funded a trip to three universities in Peru in order to generate research and teaching collaborations. Dr. Jose Cisneros organized the trip and invited Dr. Harris, along with four other CALS faculty and administrators to participate.

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Mali and Burkina Faso – Improved Adaption to Drought and Dry Cereal - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 11/04/2018 - 11/17/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Global Academy conducted a training program on Improved Adaption to Drought and Dry Cereal for four fellows from Mali and one fellow Burkina Faso spanning from November 4-17, 2017.  While at NC State, the fellows attended lectures and roundtable sessions with faculty from Department of Agricultural and Human Sciences, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Department of Applied Ecology, and Prestage Department of Poultry Science. They also visited a number of NC State research facilities such as National Science Foundation Center for Integrated Pest Management at NC State, North Carolina Plant Disease and Insect Clinic at NC State, Center for Environmental Farming Systems, and Central Crops Research Station. To gain understanding of how the government is supporting environmentally friendly programs, the fellows also met with North Carolina officials from USDA Farm Service Agency, USDA Rural Development Agency, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, North Carolina Farm Bureau, USDA-ARS Climate Change/Air Quality Laboratory, and USDA-ARS Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research Unit. As most of these fellows worked in the cotton industry in Mali and Burkina Faso, they were interested in visiting similar industry facilities in NC. With that aim, they toured private businesses such as Rock Ridge Farms, Silver Lake Cotton Grower’s Gin, Cotton, Inc, and Pace Family Farms.

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Pakistan – Soybeans and Dry Distiller Grains Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 11/03/2018 - 11/16/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Pakistan

Six agricultural professionals from Pakistan came to the U.S. from November 3 -16, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Soybeans and Dry Distiller Grains at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. The Pakistan Fellows spent 2 weeks on a USDA Cochran fellowship in the US traveling from North Carolina to Virginia, Missouri and Illinois. The goal of the training was to improve the awareness about the products available, processing and marketing infrastructure and capacity building of the solvent industry, feed mill managers and professionals. The Fellows toured Purdue Farms’, Smithfield Grain’s and Cargill’s port terminals, and met with numerous trade organizations like the American Soybean Association and the U.S. Soybean Export Council as well as other governmental agencies as means to increase connectivity between the trade professionals of the U.S. and Pakistan. During this training, the Fellows also experienced snowfall in Missouri, which was an experience in itself!

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Pakistan – Soybeans and Dry Distiller Grains - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 11/03/2018 - 11/16/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The Pakistan Fellows spent 2 weeks on a USDA Cochran fellowship in the US traveling from North Carolina to Virginia, Missouri and Illinois.  The goal of the training was to improve the awareness about the products available, processing and marketing infrastructure and capacity building of the solvent industry, feed mill managers and professionals.  The Fellows toured Purdue Farms’, Smithfield Grain’s and Cargill’s port terminals, and met with numerous trade organizations like the American Soybean Association and the U.S. Soybean Export Council as well as other governmental agencies as means to increase connectivity between the trade professionals of the U.S. and Pakistan.  

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Turfgrass visit to China Training/Workshop
Qu, Rongda
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 10/03/2018 - 11/01/2018
Funding Agency: Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China
Country(s):

In a recent trip, I visited Nanjing and Beijing.  In Nanjing, I met Dr. Jianxiu Liu and colleagues working on turfgrass breeding and genetic transformation in the Jiangsu Institute of Botany, CAS.  I was also able to give a long-due seminar there.  In Beijing, I met Dr. Wanjun Zhang, Associate Professor at CAU, working on turfgrass and switchgrass transformation. Dr. Zhang was a postdoc in my lab at NCSU before taking the position. We discussed the progress of his research projects.

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Understanding Regulation of Nicotine Biosynthesis Research project
Qu, Rongda
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 02/28/2017 - 11/01/2018
Funding Agency: Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences (YATAS), China-Peoples Rep
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

The project is in collaboration with Dr. Bingwu Wang of Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences (YATAS), China, in an attempt to understand various factors (transcription factors, pathway enzymes, agronomy measurements, photohormones...) that affect nicotine synthesis in tobacco plants.  We received a patent for the work: US patent 9580722, and wrapped up the project in late 2018.

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Bosnia - Resilient Agriculture Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 10/14/2018 - 10/27/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Global Academy conducted a two week training on resilient agriculture for a group of six fellows from Bosnia from October 14 – 27, 2017. Their backgrounds included public and private sectors as well as university, which resulted in interesting and lively dialogues during the training sessions. The training consisted of roundtable sessions, workshops, demonstration sessions and field visits covering wide variety of topics pertaining to resilient agriculture.

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Improved Adaption to Drought and Dry Cereal Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 10/24/2017 - 10/23/2018
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Mali

Four agricultural professionals from Mali and one from Burkina Faso came to the U.S. from November 4 – 17, 2017 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Improved Adaption to Drought and Dry Cereal at NC State in Raleigh, NC.  This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector.  The Fellows were interested in the cotton industry and they were able to visit Cotton Inc., Silver Lake Cotton Grower’s Gin in Elm City, and Rock Ridge Farms in Wilson during harvest season.  

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Ghana- Agricultural Biotechnology - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/30/2018 - 10/12/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The 2-week training program provided the Ghanian Fellows an opportunity to investigate what a country with GMO’s would look like.  Through this, the Fellows met with a wide-assortment of faculty and professionals including NC State’s Office of Technology Commercialization and New Ventures, numerous research faculty, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center, RTP biotech companies, and farmers.  After this program, the Fellows will have the tools to have educated discussions about GMOs in Ghana.

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Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela – Sorghum Exposure and Utilization - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/30/2018 - 10/12/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Throughout the 2-weeks, the Fellows from Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela were exposed to the sorghum industry and considerations when incorporating sorghum into animal feed.  The goal of this training program was to increase connectivity between the industry and research professionals of the U.S. with the industry professionals from Peru,  Ecuador and Venezuela.

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Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela – Sorghum Exposure and Utilization Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 09/30/2018 - 10/12/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Ecuador | Peru | Venezuela

Twelve agricultural professionals from Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela came to the U.S. from September 30 – October 12, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Sorghum Exposure and Utilization at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. Throughout the 2-weeks, the Fellows from Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela were exposed to the sorghum industry and considerations when incorporating sorghum into animal feed. The goal of this training program was to increase connectivity between the industry and research professionals of the U.S. with the industry professionals from Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela.

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Ghana- Agricultural Biotechnology Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 09/30/2018 - 10/12/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Ghana

Four agricultural professionals from Ghana came to the U.S. from September 30 – October 12, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Agricultural Biotechnology at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. The 2-week training program provided the Ghanian Fellows an opportunity to investigate what a country with GMO’s would look like. Through this, the Fellows met with a wide-assortment of faculty and professionals including NC State’s Office of Technology Commercialization and New Ventures, numerous research faculty, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center, RTP biotech companies, and farmers. After this program, the Fellows will have the tools to have educated discussions about GMOs in Ghana.

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Perú, Ecuador and Venezuela - Sorghum Exposure and Utilization Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 09/30/2018 - 10/12/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

Throughout the 2-weeks, the Fellows from Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela were exposed to the sorghum industry and considerations when incorporating sorghum into animal feed.  The goal of this training program was to increase connectivity between the industry and research professionals of the U.S. with the industry professionals from Peru,  Ecuador and Venezuela.
The delegation was on campus at the same time as the Ghanian Fellows and they had some good interactions.

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Developing Study Abroad Class on Roman Engineering Study Abroad
Hunt, William F
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 09/16/2018 - 10/07/2018
Country(s): Spain

Dr. Hunt travelled to Spain to help develop a new study abroad class on Roman engineering.

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Met with Argentinian Faculty to Discuss Collaborations and to Tour Food Processing Facilities Development project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 10/03/2018 - 10/04/2018
Country(s):

Working in conjunction with the Global Training Initiative, met with Argentinian faculty to discuss collaborations and to give them a tour of the NC State food processing facilities.  (Schaub Hall fruit and vegetable pilot plant and milk/ice cream production plant.)

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Klima 2050 Research project
Johnson, Jeffrey Patrick
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 09/17/2018 - 10/03/2018
Country(s): Norway

Klima 2050 - Risk reduction through climate adaptation of buildings and infrastructure - is a Centre for Research-based Innovation (SFI). The aim of Klima 2050 is to reduce the societal risks associated with climate changes and enhanced precipitation and flood water exposure within the built environment.

During this research, I worked with Klima 2050 and Tone Muthanna, an associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), to analyze long-term hydrologic performance of stormwater control measures in Norway to assess climate adaptability and longevity.

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Statistical methods and computer programs for linkage and QTL analysis in polyploid populations Research project
Zeng, Zhao-Bang
Statistics
Project Dates: 06/01/2015 - 09/30/2018
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s):

Funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) to develop genomic tools for sweet potato breeding, we formed a research partnership with Prof. A. Augusto F. Garcia's group at Department of Genetics, “Luiz de Queiroz” College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Brazil to develop statistical methods and computer programs for linkage and QTL analysis in polyploid populations.

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China- Crop Germplasm Conservation Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 09/16/2018 - 09/27/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Six agricultural professionals from China came to the U.S. from September 16 – 27, 2018 and participated in a program on Crop Germplasm Conservation at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. This program provided the fellows exposure on how crop germplasm is identified, inspected, and conserved and how this information is shared throughout the country. The Fellows traveled throughout the country to talk with numerous professionals and scientists. In Washington, DC, the Fellows met with the National Plant Germplasm Laboratory, the American Seed Trade Association and toured the USDA National Arboretum. In Raleigh, NC, the Fellows met with NC State University Plant Breeding Consortium faculty , toured the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Seed Laboratory, NC State University Micropropagation and Repository Unit, and Syngenta Seeds. Then the Fellows traveled to Colorado where they met with the USDA-ARS Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation, Seed Preservation Program. On the final leg of their trip, the Fellows toured the M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center and then the Tree Fruit, Nut, and Grapes National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Davis, California. This cross-country training introduced the Fellows to a wide array of US agriculture and the multiple approaches to germplasm conservation within the US.

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China- Crop Germplasm Conservation - Scientific Exchange Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/16/2018 - 09/27/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

This program provided the fellows exposure on how crop germplasm is identified, inspected, and conserved and how this information is shared throughout the country.  The Fellows traveled throughout the country to talk with numerous professionals and scientists.  In Washington, DC, the Fellows met with the National Plant Germplasm Laboratory, the American Seed Trade Association and toured the USDA National Arboretum.  In Raleigh, NC, the Fellows met with NC State University Plant Breeding Consortium faculty , toured the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Seed Laboratory, NC State University Micropropagation and Repository Unit, and Syngenta Seeds.  Then the Fellows traveled to Colorado where they met with the USDA-ARS Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation, Seed Preservation Program.  On the final leg of their trip, the Fellows toured the M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center and then the Tree Fruit, Nut, and Grapes National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Davis, California.  This cross-country training introduced the Fellows to a wide array of US agriculture and the multiple approaches to germplasm conservation within the US.

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China - Crop Germplasm Conservation Training/Workshop
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 09/16/2018 - 09/27/2018
Country(s):

This program provided the fellows exposure on how crop germplasm is identified, inspected, and conserved and how this information is shared throughout the country.  The Fellows traveled throughout the country to talk with numerous professionals and scientists.  In Washington, DC, the Fellows met with the National Plant Germplasm Laboratory, the American Seed Trade Association and toured the USDA National Arboretum.  In Raleigh, NC, the Fellows met with NC State University Plant Breeding Consortium faculty , toured the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Seed Laboratory, NC State University Micropropagation and Repository Unit, and Syngenta Seeds.  Then the Fellows traveled to Colorado where they met with the USDA-ARS Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation, Seed Preservation Program.  On the final leg of their trip, the Fellows toured the M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center and then the Tree Fruit, Nut, and Grapes National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Davis, California.  This cross-country training introduced the Fellows to a wide array of US agriculture and the multiple approaches to germplasm conservation within the US.

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Turkey - Biotechnology Policy and Communication Development project
Beseli, Amber Lynn
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 09/03/2018 - 09/18/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The goal of this program was to help Turkey develop a science-based and transparent approach to the genetically engineered products and improve the Turkey Biosafety Law.  During this program, the Fellows learned about U.S. and global policies for biotech regulation; biotech production, supply, and demand; biotech research and development; risk communication in agricultural biotechnology; animal feeding and feed production.
We did have to cut the 2-week session short due to Hurricane Florence, but we hope the experience was well-received and some long-lasted relationships were developed.

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Agricultural and Gastronomic Tour of Italy 2018 Training/Workshop
Tiezzi, Francesco
Animal Science
Project Dates: 09/07/2018 - 09/17/2018
Country(s): Italy

GOALS:
The goal of this Agricultural and Gastronomic Discovery Tour of Italy is for participants to learn about time-honored traditions of farming, food production and marketing while gaining a greater appreciation for the local food systems in Italy.

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?
The tour is proposed to farmers, entrepreneurs, chefs and anybody that has in interested in local, traditional food system or industry (but all are welcome). This discovery tour of Italy will promise a very full itinerary with plenty of exercise. The tour is to be meant as an “traveling workshop”. We will provide technical descriptions of the businesses prior to our visits, while the operational details of the farms will be explained during the visits. Particular focus will be on the marketing strategies that the farms use, from wholesale or direct sales of products to running restaurants on the farm – all marketing aspects will be explored.

THIRTEEN FARM/SPECIALTY FOOD VISITS:
»DAIRY FARMS: We will visit six farms (including cattle, sheep and buffalo) that engage in dairy processing; from bottling milk, to making other dairy products or processing it into cheese.
»CHEESE MAKERS: We will visit three small to medium-sized cheesemakers, that process milk from a multitude of species into traditional and niche cheeses.
»BEEF (CATTLE) FARMS: with special emphasis on those raising heritage breeds, like Chianina (accredited as the largest cattle breed in the world) and Maremmana, which is especially suited for outdoor raising in harsh conditions.
»PIG FARM: We will visit a pasture- based hog farm that raises the heritage breed ‘Cinta Senese’, which is well known for its charcuterie quality.
»DISTILLERY: The tour also includes a visit to a distillery that makes grappa, a brandy distilled from the fermented residue of grapes after they have been pressed in winemaking.
»FRESH PASTA: We will visit a shop that makes fresh pasta daily using recipes handed down for generations.

MEALS:
Meals will highlight time-honored Italian traditions, using only the freshest ingredients, at farms and restaurants that value the “farm to fork” approach. Great care has been taken to search out family-owned, family-run restaurants, that put emphasis on traditional dishes with a focus on meat and seafood dishes. All communal meals will be fixed menu and served family style.

LODGING:
Participants will have the opportunity to explore a wide variety of traditional lodging styles. From on-farm stays at some of the farms we visit to bed and breakfasts to hotels – all value traditional Italian hospitality and are quite comfortable.

 

EXTRAS:
Throughout this discovery of Italy, great care has been taken to build in time to visit some true historical gems. From an Etruscan necropolis to the resort town of Amalfi to the lush wine region of Montepulciano to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Pienza. A trip to Italy would not be complete without taking in some of the ancient historical sites the Tuscan region has to offer.

 

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Turkey-Biotechnology Policy and Communication Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 09/03/2018 - 09/14/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Turkey

Six agricultural professionals from Turkey came to the U.S. from September 3 – 14, 2018 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Biotechnology Policy and Communication at NC State in Raleigh, NC. This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with with professionals from the USDA, university, state, and the private sector. The goal of this program was to help Turkey develop a science-based and transparent approach to the genetically engineered products and improve the Turkey Biosafety Law. During this program, the Fellows learned about U.S. and global policies for biotech regulation; biotech production, supply, and demand; biotech research and development; risk communication in agricultural biotechnology; animal feeding and feed production. We did have to cut the 2-week session short due to Hurricane Florence, but we hope the experience was well-received and some long-lasted relationships were developed.

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Turkey- Biotechnology Policy and Communication - Cochran Program Training/Workshop
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 09/03/2018 - 09/14/2018
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s):

The goal of this program was to help Turkey develop a science-based and transparent approach to the genetically engineered products and improve the Turkey Biosafety Law.  During this program, the Fellows learned about U.S. and global policies for biotech regulation; biotech production, supply, and demand; biotech research and development; risk communication in agricultural biotechnology; animal feeding and feed production.

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Resilient Agriculture Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 09/25/2017 - 09/13/2018
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s):

Seven agricultural professionals from Bosnia and Herzegovina came to the U.S. from October 14 – 28, 2017 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Resilient Agriculture at NC State in Raleigh.  This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with the cooperation of many different partners at NC State and within the state.  Some of the highlights of this training program were visits to: the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, Flavor 1st Growers and Packing, Johnson’s Peaches, Lewis Creek Farms, USDA Rural Development Agency, CEFS, the Sandhills Research Station, and the USDA-ARS Climate Change/Air Quality Laboratory.  

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Genomic tools for sweetpotato improvement Research project
Quesada-Ocampo, Lina Maria
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 08/29/2014 - 08/31/2018
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s):

Description

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Genomic Tools for Sweetpotato Improvement (GT4SP) Development project
Yencho, George (Craig) Craig
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 09/01/2014 - 08/31/2018
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Australia | Ghana | Kenya | Peru | Uganda

This project will develop modern genomic, genetic, and bioinformatics tools to facilitate crop improvement and improve genetic gains in sweetpotato, an important food security and cash crop with highly recognized potential to alleviate hunger, vitamin A deficiency, and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and predominantly grown in small plot holdings by poor women farmers. https://sweetpotatogenomics.cals.ncsu.edu/

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Feed Formulation for Poultry Industry Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 08/28/2017 - 08/21/2018
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Ghana

Four agricultural professionals came to North Carolina from September 12 – 25, 2017 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Feed Formulation for Poultry Industry at NC State in Raleigh.  This training program was planned by CALS Global Academy and was carried out with the cooperation of many different partners at NC State and within the state.  Some of the highlights of this training program were visits to: Premex, Coker Feed Mill, Case Farms Calypso Feed Mill, and the NCSU Feed Mill.  The Fellows learned about importing U.S. grains from the NCDA&CS International Trade Office and from the North Carolina Small Grain Growers Association.  The Fellows spent many hours with Edgar Oviedo, Peter Ferket, and Adam Fahrenholz learning about best feed formulation practices.  

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Food Supplement Programs Training/Workshop
Cisneros, Juan (Jose) Jose
Horticultural Science
International Programs
Project Dates: 08/28/2017 - 08/21/2018
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Jordan

Eight agricultural professionals came to the U.S. from September 30 – October 13, 2017 and participated in the USDA-FAS Cochran Fellowship Program on Food Supplement Programs at NC State. The Fellows started their Cochran Fellowship in Washington, D.C. and then flew to NC for the remainder of their program.  Some of the highlights of this training program were visits to: the USDA, Aberdeen Elementary, and the NCDA&CS Food Distribution Division.  The attended multiple workshops on SNAP and EBT programs.  

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Course on Principles of Environmental Catalysis Training/Workshop
Kolar, Praveen
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 08/03/2018 - 08/20/2018
Funding Agency: Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India, India
Country(s): India

Dr. Kolar visited Central University of Haryana (CUH), Mahendergarh, India to deliver a 2-week course on Principles of Environmental Catalysis. He had a great time while there. The course was organized through the government of India's initiative called global initiative of academic network (GIAN).  Dr. Kolar also initiated a couple of research projects (submitting a letter of intent and pending decision).

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International Research Experience - Peru Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 05/15/2018 - 07/31/2018
Country(s): Peru

Undergraduate research experience in Lima, Peru with the International Potato Center (CIP) where the student was immersed in the local culture and worked with international researchers throughout Peru.  The student conducted field and laboratory research on potato nutrients. 

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International Research Experience - Spain Research project
Tucker, Adrienne LaBranche
International Programs
Academic Programs
Project Dates: 05/15/2018 - 07/31/2018
Country(s): Spain

Management of undergraduate research experience in Villaviciosa, Spain where students were immersed in the local culture while working with international researchers at the Dairy Istitute of Asturias (Instituto de Productos Lacteos de Asturias).  The students conducted laboratory research to isolate microbial DNA from whey samples and identify bacterial strains. 

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Genetic Engineering and Society: The Case of Transgenic Pests NSF-IGERT Development project
Gould, Fred
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 07/31/2018
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Mexico | Peru

Description

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Knowledge-breeding of raspberry and strawberry Training/Workshop
Fernandez, Gina E
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 06/24/2018 - 07/02/2018
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Dr. Fernandez traveled to Liaoning Institute of Pomology (LIP), China Agriculture University (CAU) and Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences in late June 2018. At the LIP, she visited their raspberry breeding program lab, greenhouse and field locations. She also presented a talk on the NCSU raspberry breeding program with the focus on developing heat tolerance in raspberry. She also visited CAU and Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences where she presented talks on strawberry breeding for disease resistance. 

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Aquatic Weed Sensing and Management Research project
Richardson, Rob
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2018 - 06/30/2018
Country(s): Australia | New Zealand

Provide outreach related to aquatic weed management and conduct research to control aquatic invasive species.

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Association of total mineral content and elemental speciation with the healing properties of berries. Research project
Lila, Mary Ann
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 07/01/2017 - 06/30/2018
Country(s): Brazil | United Kingdom | United States

Co-investigators Felipe-Sotelo, Ward, Lila & Seimi Nomura

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Combating global health challenges: an international effort to mitigate food allergy through the development of hypoallergenic edible protein-polyphenol ingredients. Research project
Lila, Mary Ann
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 07/05/2017 - 06/30/2018
Country(s): Australia | United States

A collaborative project between the FOODplus Research Centre and North Carolina State University. Co-Investigators:  Muhlhausler, Beverly, Nat Plundrich & Mary Ann Lila.

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JEEM Conference in Environmental and Resource Economics Training/Workshop
von Haefen, Roger H
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Project Dates: 06/21/2018 - 06/24/2018
Country(s): Norway

Co-organized the inaugural JEEM conference in Environmental Resource Economics, an international conference in Norway that brought together 10 scholars to present and discussant frontier research in environmental and resource economics.

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Sow Longevity Research project
Flowers, William L
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 05/31/2018
Country(s): Canada

Description

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Peruvian Fisheries Development Project Development project
Hinshaw, Jeffrey M
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 04/08/2018 - 04/15/2018
Country(s): Peru

Participated in an exploratory development project to initiate a joint NCSU-Peru Fisheries Project, coordinated by CALS International Programs.

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Development of captive breeding, larval rearing technologies and management practices for African Lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus)
Reading, Benjamin J
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 01/01/2017 - 04/01/2018

USAID, Aquafish Innovation Lab, 01/01/17-04/01/18, Development of captive breeding, larval rearing technologies and management practices for African Lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus). Co-Principal Investigators: B.J. Reading, R.J. Borski, J. Terhune, C. Boyd, and J.J. Molnar; Host Country Principal Investigator: J. Walakira (National Fisheries Resources Research Institute, Kampala, Uganda). 

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Fruitlook - PIRSES International Consortium on fruit development Development project
Franks, Robert G
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 03/15/2018
Country(s): Italy | Spain | Sweden

"FRUIT LOOK aims to address the following key questions: Which are the genetic and molecular networks regulating fruit formation and morphology? Do plant hormones act as morphogens during fruit development? Can we elaborate a model able to explain fruit forms? Fruit development is a genetically programmed process, unique to flowering plants, which provides a suitable environment for seed maturation and seed dispersal. Given the fundamental nature of both the dietary and biological significance of fruit, molecular dissection of fruit development has considerable interest"

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USAID Project, Masters and Doctoral Student Training: Dairy Interest.
Fellner, Vivek
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2018

Description

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Collaboration with Dr. Lihong Zhao
Koci, Matthew D
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 05/01/2016 - 12/31/2017
Country(s):

From May 2016 to May 2017 we hosted Dr. Lihong Zhao from the China Agricultural University in Beijing China.  During this time we developed a collaborative project blending our interests in avian immunology and her interest in poultry nutrition, specifically, her work to develop technologies that remediate the impact of mycotoxins in the feed.  In August of 2017 I visited her laboratory for 2 weeks.  We have one paper in preparation and are currently hosting a visiting graduate student from her research group.

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A Road Map Towards Effective Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes by 2025 Training/Workshop
Bird, David M
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 05/07/2016 - 12/31/2017
Funding Agency: Indo-US Science and Technology Forum (IUSSTF), India
Country(s): India

Plant Parasitic Nematodes (PPN) negatively impact all facets of global agriculture, and there is a compelling need to translate basic research on nematode biology to the deployment of strategies to achieve effective control. The Indo-US workshop titled A road map towards effective management of plant-parasitic nematodes by 2025 organized by Umarao (ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi) and David Bird (North Carolina State University, Raleigh) was convened with the ambitious target to develop tools to alleviate at least one half of the yield loss attributable to nematodes by 2025. The workshop brought together a panel of renowned PPN researchers from India and USA to define the challenges that must be overcome to meet this goal. The workshop aimed at evaluating the literature (current and old) to distinguish dogma from data; identifying the best PPN species to exploit, and how realistically one can extrapolate from one species to another; assessing the technologies in hand, and those that are needed; identifying gaps in our basic understanding of PPN biology, and suggesting how we plug those gaps; developing assays to get quickly to the field, ideally using farmer-acceptable crops and cultivars; and, identifying appropriate funding source(s). (Connect Newsletter May 2016 http://www.iusstf.org/cms/gall_content/2016/5/2016_5$PDF109_May_2016_132510500.pdf)

Further research and collaboration is an outcome of this workshop with Dr. David Bird(NC State University) and Dr. Uma Rao (Indian Agricultural Research Institute) continue discussion on the goals and outcomes of the road map.  

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Jamaican Turf grass Industry Development project
Yelverton, Fred H
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2017 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): Jamaica

Cosultation to Jamaican turf grass industries in relation to organization, governement relationships and industry promotion. 

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Ongoing Teaching Collaborations with TEC de Monterrey in Querétaro, Mexico Training/Workshop
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 02/19/2014 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): Mexico

This collaboration with Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (TEC de Monterrey) in Queretaro, Mexico, is the result of a sabbatical previously undertaken with the institution. The the goal of the sabbatical was to teach Food Science and Toxicology courses to undergraduates at TEC de Monterrey in a way that focused on technology and active learning. Courses were also taught in English as a way of developing students' foreign language skills around their knowledge of Food Science. The developing collaboration since then between TEC de Monterrey has resulted in ongoing visits as well as hosting a student in a lab here at NC State.

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Survey of Economically Important Citrus Fruit Flies in China that Threat U.S. Agricultural Production Development project
Xia, Yulu
Center for Integrated Pest Management
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

This project is to survey citrus-damage fruit flies in China for preventing those economically significant pest from entering the U.S., through trade and human traffic. Field survey sides are being implemented across major China citrus production regions (see attached pictures).

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Elucidating the Roles of Manganese Oxides in Regulating Arsenic Contamination of Groundwater in Southern Asia. Development project
Duckworth, Owen W
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2017
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Cambodia

Around the world, over 100 million people routinely consume well water with naturally occurring arsenic concentrations that exceed safe drinking-water guidelines. Although the global scale, health impacts, and extreme societal costs of arsenic contamination are apparent, it is less well understood to what extent arsenic may threaten groundwater that is currently arsenic-free. This issue is critical because arsenic contamination of previously uncontaminated aquifers has been observed to occur over timescales of decades. The overall goal of this research is to quantify the potential for future arsenic contamination of groundwater from sources that are both internal and external to aquifers. To achieve this goal, we will conduct a suite of field, laboratory and spectroscopic analyses on sediment samples from a well-characterized aquifer in Cambodia, where groundwater is potentially at risk for future arsenic contamination. In particular, this work will take advantage of natural sediment variability to investigate how the quantities and chemical reactivities of specific minerals govern arsenic concentrations in well water.

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Novel disease diagnostics and an early warning system for Phytopthora infestans for smallholder farmers in East Africa Development project
Ristaino, Jean Beagle
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 09/01/2014 - 12/31/2017
Funding Agency: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USA
Country(s): Kenya | Uganda

Developing novel disease diagnostics and an early warning system for Phytopthora infestans for smallholder farmers in East Africa.

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Global Geography and Power, National Capital Development, Food and Environmental Consequences Research project
Kick, Edward (Edward) L
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Project Dates: 01/01/2015 - 12/31/2017
Country(s):

With two bio-engineers and a private health expert I have collected data on fifty variables for 200 countries for which I am analyzing (using Structural Equation Modeling and Path Analysis) the relationships between: global geographical characteristics (climate. eco-systems,....), world power, national "capitals" (education, military, finances,....), infrastructure, crop and meat production, food security, and environmental degradation.

This model will allow researchers to identify the causes among variales and the strength in which they affect on another and lead to other variables such as food insecurty. This allows researchers to caluculate the best strategies for addressing the unique needs of individual countries in reducing hunger across the globe. 

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USAID Grain Legume Innovation Lab Development project
Kornegay, Julia L
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Ecuador | Guatemala | Honduras | Uganda

Dr. Kornegay is currently the Chair of the Technical Management Advisory Committee (TMAC) of the USAID-funded Legume Innovation Lab which awards about $25 million in grants to collaborative research projects on food legumes for U.S. Universities and National Agricultural Research programs in Latin America and Africa. 

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Turfgrass Management Training/Workshop
Yelverton, Fred H
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): France | Russia | Spain

Description

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Student Exchange program Study Abroad
Aday, Derek
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 12/31/2017
Funding Agency: North Carolina State University, USA
Country(s): Australia

Description

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Cultivation and biorefinery of high-lipid microalgae for biodiesel and DHA productions Research project
Cheng, Jay J.
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Description

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Validation of Biltong processing Research project
Hanson, Dana J
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/31/2017
Country(s): South Africa

Determining the microbiological biome in various antelope species. 

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Aquatic Plant Management Development project
Richardson, Rob
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2015 - 12/30/2017
Country(s): Australia

Provide outreach for invasive aquatic plant management.

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Weed management in peanut-cropping systems in central Argentina Research project
Leon, Ramon Gonzalo
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 12/03/2017 - 12/09/2017
Country(s): United States | Argentina

Visit to Central Argentina to help peanut growers develop weed management strategies for herbicide resistant weeds based on integrated approaches. The area of influence of the visit included over 150,000 acres of peanut in more than 1.5 million acres of soybean and corn rotations.

The project also generated information that will be included in a peanut production book of the American Peanut Research and Education Society.

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Field Deployable Nutrient-Rich Biodegradable Matrix for Crop Rotation Development project
Opperman, Charles H.
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 12/01/2014 - 12/01/2017
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Kenya | Nigeria | Uganda | Benin

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Assisting Argentinian and Mexican Universities Obtain Higher Education Review Board Approval Development project
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 06/15/2012 - 10/31/2017
Country(s):

During work with the Institute of Food Technology's Higher Education Review Board assisted universities in Spanish-speaking countries, including Argentina and Mexico to obtain approval of their undergraduate food science programs.

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Neutron Crystallograhic Structure of T4 Lysozyme Research project
Meilleur, Flora
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 08/01/2015 - 10/01/2017
Country(s): United States

Description

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Survey and comparative detection of the Rhizoctonia fungi associated with vascular streak dieback disease in cacao-growing areas of the Philippines Development project
Cubeta, Marc A
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 09/30/2015 - 09/29/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Philippines

This project focuses on conducting a survey for the occurrence of vascular streak dieback (VSD), an emerging fungal disease that is threatening cacao production in the Philippines and southeast Asia. Additional experiments will be conducted to develop a robust diagnostic assay to detect the fungus from infected plant and methods to inoculate plants with the fungus to develop methods to screen cacao germplasm for resistance to VSD.

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Intensive Short Course in Food Science for Chinese Students from Four Universities (collaboration with GTI) Training/Workshop
Harris, Gabriel (Keith) Keith
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 07/06/2017 - 08/09/2017
Country(s): United States

In collaboration with Michael Bustle of GTI (Global Training Initiative) we prepared and conducted an intensive short course for 17 Chinese students from four universities.  This course include lectures and labs, as well as tours (Howling Cow Dairy, Videri Chocolate, North Carolina Department of Agriculture Labs, Herbalife, Lonerider Brewery, S&D Coffee).  Lecture themes included Food Science, Nutrition, and Toxicology.  Lectures were followed by labs to reinforce lecture topics.  The course culminated in with a tour of the North Carolina Research Center facilities in Kannapolis, NC.

 

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“Liberia Excellence in Higher Education (EHELD)” Development project
Farin, Charlotte E
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 07/31/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Liberia

To support the development of an agricultural center of excellence at Cuttington University in Liberia. To train future faculty for Cuttington University and develop curriculum for the college of agriculture and sustainable development (CASD). 

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Plant Resources, Ecology, and Culture in eastern China Study Abroad
Xiang, Qiuyun(Jenny)
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 07/01/2017 - 07/21/2017
Funding Agency: Others,
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

It is a summer study abroad program that has been running since 2008.

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Using Applied Research and Technology Transfer to Minimize Aflatoxin Contamination and Increase Production, Quality and Marketing of Peanut in Ghana Development project
Jordan, David L
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 10/01/2013 - 07/01/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Ghana

A wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses negatively impact peanut production in the field and generally contributes to the reduced quality of marketed peanut in Ghana and West Africa. Aflatoxin contamination can occur and increase at all steps of the peanut supply chain including production in the field, storage in fields and villages, and in processed products. Interventions at each step of the supply chain can minimize aflatoxin contamination. Improved production in the field including pest resistant cultivars, adequate soil fertility and plant nutrition, and synchronization of peanut pod growth phase with adequate soil moisture can increase peanut yield and quality and minimize aflatoxin contamination. Adequate and timely drying of farmer stock peanut minimizes additional production of aflatoxin during storage in villages prior to marketing. Effective processing of farmer stock and shelled stock peanut can also reduce aflatoxin prior to purchase and consumption. Determining current practices by farmers, conducting research to mitigate aflatoxin and improve peanut quality, and transferring appropriate technology to farmers are needed to improve productivity, profits, and quality of peanut and to increase safety of peanut products consumed by humans and livestock.

The primary platform being used to research aflatoxin contamination of peanut in the supply chain in Ghana is taking place in nine villages in northern and central Ghana. Interventions at each step of the supply chain are being implemented and aflatoxin contamination determined. Research is conducted at two institutions associated with the Savanna Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) and at the Crops Research Institute (CRI) to develop appropriate production and pest management strategies and to evaluate new germplasm suitable for the region. Results from efforts at villages and research stations are presented to farmers using the Farmer Field School approach and appropriate posters, bulletins and manuals. Graduate student training is closely linked to activities in villages and research stations.

Results from the project are providing farmers in Ghana with information on documented interventions that reduce aflatoxin contamination of peanut throughout the supply chain. Improved productivity and quality of peanut coupled with acceptable levels of aflatoxin in peanut products improve access to local, regional, national and international markets leading to enhanced economic viability of farmers and their communities.

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Production to Consumption - Technologies to Improve Peanut Production, Processing, and Utilization in Haiti Development project
Jordan, David L
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2015 - 07/01/2017
Country(s): Haiti

The overall goal of this project is to address and mitigate key constraints to peanut production and utilization in Haiti. Peanuts have been and continue to be an important part of Haitian diet and culture. In addition, peanuts provide an important source of cash income. To combat malnutrition in the country, certain NGOs have developed facilities to produce peanut-based Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food or RUTF. To date, however, there has been limited utilization of locally grown peanut due to issues with productivity, quality and aflatoxin contamination.

In this project, we are developing a comprehensive production, processing and utilization strategy for peanuts in Haiti. All phases of peanut production are being evaluated, including varieties specific to the region and market influences. We are instituting a seed-increase program and developing facilities to maintain genetic resources through curation of important peanut germplasm. Capacity building through the introduction of labor saving devices and harvesting equipment and procedures is underway, along with evaluating the infrastructure to improve peanut handling, drying and long-term storage. Once these improvements have been evaluated, we take the best management practices and strategies to the grower level at several villages and communities in the region, particularly through the depot network partnership with the Acceso Peanut Enterprise Corporation. We are providing training and infrastructure support to realize these improvements and ensure long-term capacity building. Aflatoxin and the role of women in the peanut value chain is being measured/surveyed throughout the duration and in all phases of the project. We are also establishing aflatoxin-testing facilities and re-training Haitians in how to measure and the importance of avoiding aflatoxin in their diet. Another important capacity-building measure is the creation of alternative products/markets for high aflatoxin contaminated peanuts.

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Aflatoxin Management Interventions, EducAflatoxin management interventions, education, and Analysis at Various Steps within the Value Chain in Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia Development project
Brandenburg, Rick L
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Project Dates: 07/01/2013 - 06/30/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Malawi | Mozambique | Zambia

This project focuses on a vlalue chain approach to improving peanut production and profitability along with interventions to reduce aflatoxin at various stages of the value chain. The project includes plant breeders, agronomists, pest management specilaist, food scientists, biological and agricultural engineers, and socio economists from NC State, the Univ of GA, Va Tech and UCONN.  We are linked with the University of Zambia, Lilongwe University of Ag and Natural Resources, ICRISAT, and International Ag Institute of Mozambique. and the Univ of Eduardo Maldo  Extensive field and laboratory trials are underway and the project is currently supporting more than a dozen students at the various host instititutions in Africa.

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Costa Rica Study Abroad Exploration for Youth, Family, and Community Sciences Study Abroad
Allen, Kimberly I.
Agricultural and Human Sciences
Project Dates: 04/01/2017 - 06/01/2017
Country(s): Costa Rica

This project was developed in order to create a study abroad Maymester course for the Youth, Family, and Community Sciences graduate program.  The course will provide YFCS students and others with an opportunity to gain an international experience observing and working with non-profit community based programs that address youth and family concerns.

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Murdoch University Marine Mammal research Research project
Pollock, Kenneth (Ken) H
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 05/31/2017
Country(s): Australia

Description

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New Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods Research project
Pollock, Kenneth (Ken) H
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 05/31/2017
Country(s): Australia

Description

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Prestage Department of Poultry Science: University of Adelaide Student Exchange Development project
Koci, Matthew D
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 05/17/2017 - 05/27/2017
Country(s): Australia

Ten day trip to Adelaide South Australia to meet and work out specific course alignment between the Prestage Department of Poultry Science and the poultry group at the Roseworthy campus of the University of Adelaide.

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Prestage Department of Poultry Science Multicultural Scholars Program Special Experiential Learning Training/Workshop
Koci, Matthew D
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 05/06/2017 - 05/22/2017
Country(s): United Kingdom

The Multicultural Scholars in the Prestage Department of Poultry Science spent 2 weeks visiting the Agri-Food and Biotechnology Institute in Northern Ireland in the spring of 2017 where they learned about local food animal production systems, and the educational, research, and outreach programs designed to support the food animal industry of  Northern Ireland.

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Identifying a key gene for resistance-breaking Satellites Development project
Ascencio-Ibanez, Jose (Trino) Trinidad
Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 04/30/2017
Country(s): Tanzania

Description

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Pakistan – U.S. Science and Technology (S&T) Cooperation Program Research project
Carver, Donna K
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 01/17/2017 - 03/05/2017
Funding Agency: The National Academies, USA
Country(s): United States

Description  This program funds research projects planned and conducted jointly by researchers from Pakistan and the US.  These funds are used to improve monitoring and detection of food animal diseases.  Each reviewer reviews 10 proposals and the group discusses the feasibility of the projects.  Very few are actually funded.

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Sin Suleo Sin Comeda: How can sustainable soil management improve food security for smallholder farmers in El Salvador Research project
Schroeder-Moreno, Michelle S
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 06/01/2015 - 01/07/2017
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): El Salvador

This was a 2 year research and community development project that was served as the primary masters reseach project for my  graduate student, Angel Cruz. It was funded through the Fulbright student scholarship and the Borloug Global Food Security fellowship both awarded to Angel Cruz. In addition to sustianable agriculture production and soil management research, it had strong community participatory and on-farm components and we worked with a local NGO (FUNDAMER) focused on community development. 

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Spacial and Temporal Variation of Soil Thermal and Hydraulic Properties in the Root Zone Research project
Heitman, Joshua Lee
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2017
Funding Agency: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), China
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Development of sensors for measuring root zone characteristics. 

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Development of novel Salmonella control practices and integrated education program to reduce Salmonellosis Research project
Hassan, Hosni M
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 01/01/2017
Funding Agency: National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USA
Country(s): United States

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Journal of Environmental and Resource Economists (Co-Editor-in-Chief) Research project
von Haefen, Roger H
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2017
Country(s): Netherlands

Description

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Cassava virus diversity Development project
Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda K
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 01/01/2017
Country(s): Tanzania

Description

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An Econometric Analysis of Harmful Drinking and Price Response by Alcoholic Types to Inform Alcohol Tax Policies Development project
Wohlgenant, Michael K
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 12/31/2016
Country(s): Australia

Description

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African Plant Breeding Academy Training/Workshop
Wehner, Todd C.
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2016
Country(s): Kenya | Tanzania

Todd Wehner traveled to Tanzania in December to teach at the African Plant Breeding Academy for session 1 of class 2 (class 1 met 2013 to 2014). PBA is a 3-session program over an 18 month period that is supported by UC Davis, the New Partnership for Africa’s Development, and the African Orphan Crops Consortium. The 29 students receive scholarships from Mars-M&M. Local administration is by the International Center for Research on Agro-Forestry (CGIAR). Students are working plant breeders with education at the MS or PhD, and come from 16 different countries in Africa. The lectures and laboratories were held in Dar Es Salaam, with a field trip to a spice research station in Zanzibar. Dr. Wehner worked with 3 other lecturers, 2 staff from ICRAF, and the UC Davis program coordinator (and 2 police escorts).

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Plant Breeding Academy - Asia Development project
Wehner, Todd C.
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 12/31/2016
Country(s): Thailand

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Chilling Tolerance in Watermelon Development project
Wehner, Todd C.
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2009 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: North Carolina State University, USA
Country(s): Poland

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Cucumber Gene Mutants Development project
Wehner, Todd C.
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2008 - 12/31/2016
Country(s):

Description

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Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa
Yencho, George (Craig) Craig
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2008 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), USA
Country(s): Ethiopia | Kenya | Rwanda | Uganda

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Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening) and Asian Citrus Psyllid Survey Development project
Xia, Yulu
Center for Integrated Pest Management
Project Dates: 01/01/2000 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Find a strategy to combat HLB agricultural bacterial disease that effects the US. It originally developed in China. 

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Ecology of Amphidromous Fisheries Research project
Kwak, Thomas J.
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 01/01/2004 - 12/31/2016
Country(s):

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Development of High Yielding Multiple Resistant Sweetpotato Germplasm Development project
Yencho, George (Craig) Craig
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/1997 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: The McKnight Foundation, USA
Country(s): Uganda

Description

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International Symposium on Integrated Crop-Livestock Systems Training/Workshop
Franzluebbers, Alan J
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2007 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA), Brazil
Country(s): Brazil

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Development of Resistance to Cercospora Diseases of Crops Development project
Daub, Margaret E
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Egypt

Studying the role of the photoactivated toxin cercosporin in diseases caused by Cercospora species.  Engineering plants for resistance to cercosporin.

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Global Plant Health Study Abroad Program Study Abroad
Daub, Margaret E
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA
Country(s): Costa Rica

Study abroad program on tropical agriculture in Costa Rica.

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Engineering Camelina sativa to increase yield for bioenergy production Research project
Sederoff, Heike
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 02/01/2016 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, United States
Country(s): Canada

Camelina sativa is an excellent oil crop for biofuel production because it grows with little water and fertilizer on marginal land. To improve camelina as a dedicated biofuel plant, we have increased its photosynthetic CO2-fixation rates by modifying CO2 transport, assimilation and allocation and reducing the cost of photorespiraton. To extend its agricultural range, we are improving its stress tolerance against heat and drought. Several of these transgenic lines showed successful yield increases of over 50% in greenhouse trials. The international collaboration with Metabolix Oilseeds in Saskatoon, Canada, enabled field trials to study the effect of these transgenes on yield in the usual agricultural and climate environment.

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World Congress of Soil Science Development project
Franzluebbers, Alan J
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/1998 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Australia | France | Thailand

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International Soil Tillage Research Organization Development project
Franzluebbers, Alan J
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/1997 - 12/31/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): Australia | Germany | Poland | Turkey

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Unlocking the epigenome for crop improvement Development project
Hsieh, Tzung-Fu
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 04/29/2015 - 12/30/2016
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

Phenotypic variation within organisms is driven primarily by genetic diversity. However, there is a growing appreciation that epigenetic variation, resulting from a multitude of diverse chemical modifications to the DNA and chromatin, can have profound effects on phenotype. Large-scale interrogation of epigenome inheritance in Arabidopsis has revealed that spontaneous variation in DNA methylation occurs at a rate that is orders of magnitude greater than genetic mutation, indicating the key importance of epigenetic variation during evolution. Thus, there is a potential for epigenetics to play a role in crop improvement, including regulation of transgene expression and creation of novel epialleles. 
 
My lab has established a research collaboration with Dr. Xiangqing Zhang at the South China Agriculture University to study several epigenetic mutants in rice. Dr. Zhang is a rice breeder and his group has identified several rice mutant lines that were caused by epigenetic purtubrations. He is currently a visiting scholar in my lab (since April 2015). We have been collaborating on several projects to explore epigenetic mechanisms regulating important rice traits. To achieve that, we germinated rice seeds in the presence of DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-cytidine (or 5-aza-C), for two days. The treated plants are currently growing in a test field in South China. We design strategy to assess DNA methylation levels in these treated rice plants, and will use them to perform reciprocal crosses with wt rice plants to investigate whether parent-specific genome hypomethylation can affect seed size in rice.

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Sustainable Livestock Production Practices through Stakeholder Partnerships Development project
Fellner, Vivek
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 12/01/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USA
Country(s): India

According to the UN, the world population, currently estimated at over 7.2 billion, is expected to rise by almost 1 billion by 2025. Of this growth, India is expected to grow faster than China and surpass their current 1.4 billion citizens to become the world's largest nation. As a rapidly developing and expanding country, it is apparent that India will require sensible investments in infrastructure, healthcare, industry and services to support its inhabitants sustainably; and in a global economy, changes in India will reverberate the world over. A partnership between North Carolina State University (NCSU), USA, and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR – one of the largest agricultural development and research systems in the world) was established to undertake a crucially important research project to address global grand challenges in food production, food insecurity, renewable energy production, declining natural resources and the prevalence of disease. The project partners focused on India’s highly diverse agricultural system, its most fundamental and most important industry, to learn how it can be improved to support sustainable development.

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The 2nd International Symposium on Perch and Bass (ISPB-II)
Reading, Benjamin J
Applied Ecology
Project Dates: 10/20/2016 - 11/02/2016

Conference Committee Member, The 2nd International Symposium on Perch and Bass (ISPB-II). Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China.

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Silk/Pollen Isolation (Gametophyte Factors) from Maize Development project
Goodman, Major M
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2016 - 08/31/2016
Country(s): Mexico

Here we are looking at dominant pollen blockers of ga1 and Ga1-M for use in organic maize.

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Prestage Department of Poultry Science Multicultural Scholars Program Special Experiential Learning Training/Workshop
Koci, Matthew D
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 07/20/2016 - 08/12/2016
Funding Agency: National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USA
Country(s): Australia

The Multicultural Scholars in the Prestage Department of Poultry Science spent 3 weeks visiting the University of Adelaide, in Adelaide South Australia in the summer of 2016 where they learned about local wildlife, Australia's food animal production systems, and the University programs (educational, research, and outreach) designed to support the food animal industry of Asutralia.

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Black Raspberry Genomic Infrastructure Research project
Perkins-Veazie, Penelope
Horticultural Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 07/31/2016
Funding Agency: National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USA
Country(s): United Kingdom

Description

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Fulbright Specialist Grant - Brazil Training/Workshop
Crozier, Carl R
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 06/23/2016 - 07/12/2016
Funding Agency: Fulbright Scholar Program, USA
Country(s): Brazil

 My duties involved consulting on animal waste management research, visiting with graduate students supervised by the host professor, Dr. Luciano Gatiboni, and presenting research seminars at a regional animal waste management conference held at UDESC (Santa Catarina State University), and at a forum held at the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), in the adjacent state.

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Novel Protein-Polyphenol to Mitigate Food Allergy Research project
Lila, Mary Ann
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 08/01/2015 - 07/01/2016
Funding Agency: North Carolina State University, USA
Country(s): Australia | United States

Project uses a novel protein-polyphenol irreversible binding technology to mitigate food allergy by binding the allergenic epitopes on food proteins with natural, biologically active plant polyphenols, which greatly diminishes any allergic reaction to that food protein (peanut, milk, soy, egg). The project in Adelaide focuses on egg allergy specifically and uses an egg-allergic Norway rat pup model to test the mechanisms by which allergy symptoms are alleviated

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Lead Biotechnology Associated Study Abroad Program to Poland Study Abroad
Mozdziak, Paul E
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 05/01/2004 - 06/30/2016
Country(s): Poland

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White-brown fat plasticity and metabolic inflammation in obesity and diabetes Research project
Komarnytsky, Slavko
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Plant Biology
Project Dates: 07/01/2015 - 06/30/2016
Country(s): Brazil | United States

Obesity and associated health risks are the greatest public-health challenges of our time. Recent studies indicated that proper metabolic function requires a previously unsuspected level of cooperation between the fat cells and the resident immune cells. We have obtained strong experimental evidence that pharmacological supplementation of diet-induced obese mice with triptolide, a diterpene triepoxide with potent anti-inflammatory properties, decreases macrophage recruitment and cytokine signature in fat that correlates with ‘browning’ of white adipocytes, increased glucose utilization, and improved insulin sensitivity. By combining our unique animal models DIO-triptolide (NCSU) and FAT-1 (USP) with substantial expertise in mitochondrial bioenergetics (NCSU) and flow cytometry (USP), we will demonstrate novel molecular and cellular determinants of white-brown fat plasticity and metabolic inflammation. The gained knowledge will position NCSU and USP at the forefront of human health research; allow us to capitalize on synergistic interdisciplinary expertise; generate data to support joint proposals; and ultimately lead to new treatments for patients with obesity and diabetes.

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Design and synthesis of tetrahydrothiazolopyridine derivatives Research project
Komarnytsky, Slavko
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Plant Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2013 - 05/31/2016
Country(s):

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ANS 495 Management and Conservation of Wild Animals in South Africa Development project
Ange-van Heugten, Kimberly
Animal Science
Project Dates: 05/01/2016 - 05/21/2016
Country(s): South Africa

This 2 week course begins with students meeting in Thankerton Game Reserve near Gravelotte, South Africa.  Students were expected to attend demonstrations and participate in field activities at the privately owned game reserves that Dr. Chris Boshoff (veterinarian) and Benjamin Osmers (Wildlife Biologist and Co-owner of SA WorldVets) will be working at. The day to day location varies within the Limpopo Province of South Africa depending on clinical cases. 

There are three-fold objectives of the course;

  1. Educate and familiarize students about the exotic wildlife and wildlife management practices by incorporating lectures and hands-on experience.
  2. Expose students to the current conservation challenges facing wildlife management and human conflict issues around National Parks by including lectures and observation modules.
  3. Acquaint students with the fascinating aspects of South African culture, traditions and history and its integration with the wildlife education.

The course is an overview of the field strategies and veterinary techniques that wildlife veterinarians and biologists use in management and conservation of the wildlife.  The course gives students a better understanding about how wildlife veterinarian assists game farmers in breeding and conservation of endangered wild animals. Dr. Ange-van Heughten accompanied a group of NCSU students during the summer of 2016 and is a collaborator of this study abroad program. 

 

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International Course on Poultry Production
Oviedo, Edgar O.
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 05/15/2016 - 05/21/2016

Description. This is an annual event directed to Commercial Poultry Production. The objective is to offer updated information on poultry production.

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ANS 495 Management and Conservation of Wild Animals in South Africa Study Abroad
Trivedi, Shweta
Animal Science
Project Dates: 05/01/2015 - 05/01/2016
Country(s): South Africa

This 2 week course begins with students meeting in Thankerton Game Reserve near Gravelotte, South Africa.  Students will be expected to attend demonstrations and participate in field activities at the privately owned game reserves that Dr. Chris Boshoff (veterinarian) and Benjamin Osmers (Wildlife Biologist and Co-owner of SA WorldVets) will be working at. The day to day location varies within the Limpopo Province of South Africa depending on clinical cases. 

There are three-fold objectives of the course;

  1. Educate and familiarize students about the exotic wildlife and wildlife management practices by incorporating lectures and hands-on experience.
  2. Expose students to the current conservation challenges facing wildlife management and human conflict issues around National Parks by including lectures and observation modules.
  3. Acquaint students with the fascinating aspects of South African culture, traditions and history and its integration with the wildlife education.

The course is an overview of the field strategies and veterinary techniques that wildlife veterinarians and biologists use in management and conservation of the wildlife.  The course will give students a better understanding about how wildlife veterinarian assists game farmers in breeding and conservation of endangered wild animals.   The course will be taught with the logistical support and assistance from SA World Vets  (http://www.saworldvets.com/Conservation/SA_WorldVets_Wildlife_Vets_South_Africa.html)

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Organizing a trip to Spain for U.S. meat producers Training/Workshop
Hanson, Dana J
Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
Project Dates: 04/01/2016 - 04/30/2016
Funding Agency: North Carolina State University, USA
Country(s): Spain

Collaboration with the NC State, National Country Ham Association & Association of National Industry of Carne in Espana (ANICE)

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Tobacco and Breeding Research project
Lewis, Ramsey S
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2010 - 04/08/2016
Country(s): Brazil | Switzerland

Our research program is engaged in a series of research activities with international collaborators from multiple countries related to tobacco genetics and breeding.

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Excellence in Higher Education for Liberian Development Development project
Jordan, David L
Crop and Soil Sciences
Project Dates: 01/01/2011 - 01/01/2016
Funding Agency: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), USA
Country(s): Liberia

Centers for Excellence at two Liberian universities to produce skilled graduates in engineering and agriculture to meet current and future workforce demands. EHELD is equipping top-performing young Liberian women and men to contribute to the nation’s economic development in careers as engineers, extension agents, researchers, managers, leaders, and small business owners. EHELD is also building the capacity of university faculty through extensive degree training programs and mentoring.

 

NC State’s contributions to EHELD have included support of graduate programs for Liberians who will be teaching at Cuttington University upon completion of their degrees, revision and implementation of curricula in the newly created Animal Science and Health and Plant and Soil Science departments, and supporting training activities for faculty, staff and the agricultural sector in Liberia.

 

Other participants on the EHELD team at NC State include Charlotte Farin, Sung Woo Kim, Rick Brandenburg, Jay Jayaratne, Gary Bullen, Clyde Sorenson, Bir Thapa, and Bridget Lassiter.

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Development of methods for knockout chickens Research project
Hassan, Hosni M
Prestage Department of Poultry Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2015 - 01/01/2016
Funding Agency: National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USA
Country(s): United States

CRISPR-Cas genome editing to understand foodborne-pathogen interactions in poultry 

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Efficacies of dietary trace elements and fat in alleviating heat stress of broilers and their action mechanisms at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels Research project
Xi, Lin
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 01/01/2016
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

The objectives of this project is to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of manganese and zinc as well as fat on productive performance of broiler breeders under heat stress and development of their offspring.

In this project, theories and techniques of advanced physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology are applied, and series of trials in vivo with heat-stressed broilers and in vitro with heat stress-sensitive cells of broilers in primary culture will be conducted to study the effects of manganese, zinc and fat on performances and heat stress-sensitive physiological, biochemical and molecular markers of laying broiler breeders, egg embryo during hatching and offspring broilers after hatching under heat stress. The efficacies of manganese and zinc as well as fat in alleviating heat stress of broilers will be evaluated at different physiological stages, and the anti-heat stress capabilities of offspring broilers obtained and their action mechanisms will be elucidated at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. 

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Microbiota and Relationship with Fiber Digestability in Pigs Research project
Kim, Sung Woo
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2016
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

The gut microbiota plays an important role in nutrient digestability in animals. To examine changes in the pig gut microbiota across growth stages and its effects on nutrient digestion, the gut microbiota population in pigs at 28 days (before weaning), and 60,90, and 150 days of age was assessed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. The apparent digestability of crude fiber (CF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), crude protein (CP) and ether extract (EE) was also assessed in these pigs. Work has been published in Scientific Reports. 

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Use of Putrescine and Proline to enhance intestical health of nursery pigs Research project
Kim, Sung Woo
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2015 - 01/01/2016
Funding Agency: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), China
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of oral administration of putrescine and proline during the suckling period on epithelial restitution after early weaning in piglets. This work has been published in Journal of Animal Science.

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L-Cysteine metabolism and its nutritional implications Research project
Kim, Sung Woo
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2016
Funding Agency: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), China
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolism of enterocytes along the crypt-villus axis in jejunum of early-weaned and suckled pigs by isobaric relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics.

The main objective of this study was to investigate the metabolic pathways of L-Cys catabolism to GSH, H2S, and taurine, with special emphasis on therapeutic and nutritional use of L-Cys to improve the health and well-being of animals and humans. This work has been published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.

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Dietary supplementation with Sanguinarine enhances serum metabolites and antibodies in growing pigs Research project
Kim, Sung Woo
Animal Science
Project Dates: 01/01/2014 - 01/01/2016
Funding Agency: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), China
Country(s): China-Peoples Rep

This study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary sanguinarine supplementation on serum metabolites in growing pigs. This work has been published in Journal of Animal Science.

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Substrate specificity testing of recombinant Factor VII using phage display technology Research project
Hamilton, Paul T
Plant and Microbial Biology
Project Dates: 01/01/2012 - 01/01/2016
Country(s): Denmark

In the Hamilton Lab at NCSU, we use randomized and designed peptide phage display libraries to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of proteases.  Novo Nordisk was interested in characterizing the activity and substrate specificity of proteolytic coagulation factors and variants they generated through site-directed mutagenesis and/or chemical modification.  The initial target of the project is Factor VII (FVIIa) with focus on determining the substrate specificity of wild type and several variants.

Factor VII-substrate libraries were constructed with an amino-terminal hexa-histidine sequence used to bind the phage to a Ni-NTA resin followed by a randomized Factor VII-substrate sequence and the carboxyl-terminal domain of M13 gene III. Each phage particle displays a unique, potential Factor VII-substrate sequence. Phage displaying this library of fusion proteins were bound to the Ni-NTA resin, washed to remove unbound phage and then treated with Factor VII.  Phages containing a